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January 16, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Singing
cowboy
eget
$J 0,000
ST. PAUL, Minn. (UPI) - A jury
yesterday awarded $10,000 to a 74-year-
old woman who claimed a "singing
cowboy" gave her a heart attack and
ruined her life when he used an air-
plane's address system to warn
I passengers to be ready for a crash lan-
ding.
The six-member federal jury decided
Air California Inc. was 80 percent
negligent and that passenger Larry
White of Waukow, Iowa, was 19 percent
responsible for damages. The jury said
the woman, who also was awared $226
in medical expenses, was 1 percent
negligent in the case.
THE JURORS, who deliberated
about three hours Monday and yester-
day before returning the verdict, rejec-
ted a claim of punitive damages for
Adeline Miller of Rochester.
Miller alleged in a lawsuit that the
joke ruined her life and that she now
has a fear of flying, is claustrophobic, is
afriad of snowbanks and is hesitant to
"ride in cars.
"We're very happy," her attorney,
Jonathon Gallop, said.
"IT'S VERY nice that a woman who
is 74-years-old and on Social Security
can go up against a major corporation
and justice can prevail."
White was returning from Las Vegas
with 162 vacationers on Jan. 29, 1983,
when he joked to passengers over the
public address system that the plane's
landing gear was stuck and they should
be prepared for a crash landing at the
Rochester airport.
White, who admitted he had been
drinking, finished by leading the
passengers in the country tune, "Lord,
It's Hard to be Humble."

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 16, 1985 - Page 5
Officials crack drug

ring, kingpins
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) - The penaltyc
Justice Department said yesterday that $25,000 fii
it had cracked a nationwide drug ring Meanm
that distributed 193 tons of marijuana state an
and hashish over the last decade and wind to
reaped more than $100 million in illicit a 1,000-a
income, much of it converted into country
precious gems, gold, silver and oriental reported
carpets.
A federal grand jury indictment un- Leesburg
sealed in Alexandria charged 26 people Frederi
in the operation. Seven, including one of e
three alleged kingpins of the operation, mined n
were arrested by midafternoon; the Agents
others remained at large. grounds
ALL 26 defendants were charged with Shelburn
conspiring to distribute marijuana and detectors
hashish, which carries a maximum 30-acre l

nabbed
of 15 years in prison and a
he.
while, more than 100 federal,
d local officers braved a bitter
begin an inch-by-inch search of
acre estate in Virginia's hunt
for buried booty. Officers
their initial foray into the
g, Va., home of Christopher
ck Reckmeyer turned up
in currency and an undeter-
umber of silver dollars.
planned to comb the entire
of the estate, known as
ne Glebe Farm, with metal
s, and divers were exploring a
ake.

Seeking shelter Associated Press
Members of a Salvadoran refugee family sleep under guard yesterday at St. Leo's Catholic Church in Tacoma, Wash. in
hopes of escaping a federal crackdown on illegal aliens.
First lady fears public outings

WORK WITH KIDS A T
TAMARACK CAMP
IN 1985
Brighton, Ortonville, Camp Kennedy,
Agree Outpost, and Teen-Adventure Trips
Positions for: Cabin and Specialist Counselors, Supervisors,
Service Staff, and many other positions.
INTERVIEWING JANUARY 21
Sign up at Career Planning & Placement
Note our other U. of M. interview dates:
Feb. 1, 6 & 7 at Summer Employment Fair, & 19
Tamarack is the Jewish residents camp agency sponsored by
The Fresh Air Society of Metro Detroit since 1903

WASHINGTON (AP) - Nancy
Reagan admitted yesterday that she is
afraid sometimes when she goes out in
public with her husband and said no one
could ever understand or prepare for
the glare of publicity and the con-
finement of life in the White House.
As she prepared for the beginning of
another four-year stint beside her
husband at the center of power, Mrs.
Reagan said "I don't think that
anybody can ever imagine how much of
a change it is until you're actually here.
Nobody can ever prepare you for the
scrutiny that you're under.
"WE'VE BEEN in public life prac-
tically all our lives, but this is dif-
ferent," the first lady said in an inter-
view. "There's no way to prepare your-
self for it."
But sitting in the mansion's ground-
floor Map Room with Secret Service
agents just outside the door at all times,

Reagan said she probably has "a dif-
ferent view" of the intense security
than others who have chafed at the loss
of privacy.
"If it weren't for the Secret Service, I
wouldn't have a husband," she said in a
reference to the agents who shoved
Reagan into his limousine and rushed
him to a hospital after he was seriously
wounded by a would-be assassin in
March 1981.
"SO I HAVE a very tender spot in my
heart for them," Mrs. Reagan said.
Asked if she is ever afraid when she
goes out in public with her husband, her
voice dropped to a barely audible
"Umhmm," and she nodded very
slightly. And asked if she will be afraid
on Monday during the inaugural
ceremonies and parade, Mrs. Reagan
paused and said in a voice barely
above a whisper, "Well, we'll see."
Mrs. Reagan said she thinks she has

grown by "being in the middle of
decisions that are being made that will
affect the country and possibly the
world."
"It is fascinating," she said.
"Frightening at times, frustrating at
times, but fascinating."

.4Zffice of
rnnancial
Aid
2011 Student Activities Bldg.

SPRING-SUMMER 1985
APPLICATION DEADLINE
MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 1985

To ensure equal consideration for financial aid for the 1985 Spring-Summer
term, continuing students must submit their application material by the priority
deadline. The Application must be received in the Office of Financial Aid and
the Family Financial Statement (1984-85 or 1985-86 version) mailed to ACT by:
MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 1985

' Teachers check tots for herpes

Application material is available at the OFA.
OFFICE HOURS:
Mon-Fri 8:15-11:45 and 1:00-4:00
Thurs 10:00-11:45 and 1:00-4:00

QUESTIONS?
Call us!
763-6600

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (UPI) - Teachers f
court order yesterday physically inspected presch
ts for herpes lesions and were told to send hom
with a "watery" sore.
A federal judge ordered the visual searches wh(
that a 3-year-old girl with a mild form of herpes w
to attend her special education classes as long as
sores and stayed off the school bus.
PARENTS protesting Judge Donald O'Brie
staged a one-day boycott of classes last week.
The girl, identified only as Jane Doe, is on
preschoolers nationwide whose herpes infections h
protests.
Officials ended a one-week school boycott by a
equip restrooms at Ethel Phillips Elementary
Sacramento with more towels and soap to decrea
of spreading the virus, keep other children from t
boy's food and tray, and minimize his playgrou
with other children.
A MEMO sent to teachers read: "Since we havE
U Council
tifscus
Fcondut code
(Continued from Page 1)
means of controlling discipline prob-
"lems outside the classroom, said
Eric Schanufer, another student me -
tuber of the council.
"The problems are real," Schnaufer
said, "but the question is what the
solutions to those problems are."
At last month's council meeting,
Winkelman said the previous council,
chaired by Colburn for eight years,
may have failed to keep minutes and
'announce open meetings. That council
also recommended to University
President Harold Shapiro that the
regental bylaws be amended to take
away the right of the Michigan Student
Assembly to approve or reject the con-
duct rules the council writes.
Winkelman said he may raise those
issues at today's meetings.
The open meeting, to be held in the
MSA chambers, begins at 1 p.m.

following a of exact diagnosis available, any preschool student with a
ool studen- (watery) sore will be excluded until the sore has healed or
e any child until we have confirmation from a physician that the sore is
not a herpes virus."
en he ruled "It's just formalizing what many teachers did anyway,
Nas entitled check over the kids as they took off their little coats and
she had no hats," Margit Paulsen, a school district official who coor-
dinated the searches, said. "We hope this puts an end to all
n's ruling the commotion."
Paulsen said the court order stated that teachers were to
e of three examine children's legs, faces and arms for herpes sores and
have drawn send home any child with lesions. She said health officials
from the University of Iowa made the recommendations and
agreeing to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta approved them.
School in Paulsen said the herpes checks are confined to areas easily
ase the risk visible when the students remove their coats. She said strip
ouching the searches will not be permitted unless there is medical ev-
nd contact idence indicating there might be a lesion that would require a
specific search.
e no means

II

A defense against cancer
can be cooked up'in your kitchen.

GI

EEi

S

IEIIGIA
INSTITUTE IF
lENUIGY
Major areas of graduate study and research (M.S. & Ph.D.):

There is evidence that diet
and cancer are related. Some
foods may promote cancer, while
others may protect you from it.
Foods related to lower-
ing the risk of cancer of the <
larynx and esophagus all have
high amounts of carotene, s
a form of Vitamin A which
is in cantaloupes, peaches,
broccoli, spinach, all dark
green leafy vegetables, sweet
potatoes, carrots, pumpkin,
winter squash and tomatoes,
citrus fruits and brussels
sprouts.
g pow "". Foods that may

Fruits, vegetables, and whole-
grain cereals such as oatmeal, bran
and wheat may help lower the risk
of colorectal cancer.
Foods high in fats, salt- or
nitrite-cured foods like ham, and
.0 .a
fish and
types of sausages smoked by tradi-
:tional methods should be
eaten in moderation.
Be moderate in
consumption of alco-
hol also.
A good rule of
thumb is cut down on
fat and don't be fat.
Weight reduction may
lower cancer risk. Our

Aerodynamics
Aeroelasticity
Bioengineering
Combustion

Computational Fluid Dynamics
Computer-Aided Design
Propulsion
Structural Dynamics
Structures-Composites

Individual Tuition & Fees are $1,452 per calendar year.
Total financial aid per calendar year:

764-0558

$13,452
$14,452
$ 7,500-
$10,000

Center of Excellence in Rotary Wing Aircraft
Fellowships
Lockheed/Georgia Tech Research Assistantships
Research Assistantships

help reduce the risk
of gastrointestinal
and respiratory
tract cancer are

12- year study of nearly a
million Americans uncovered
high cancer risks particularly
among people 40% or more
overweight.
Now, more than ever, we
know you can cook up your own
defense against cancer.

a t - - - - - -n ----'---L

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