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March 15, 1985 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-15

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 15, 1985 -Page 7
Savoy Brown

2 LITER BOTTLE $1.39
OPEN
10 A.M. To Midnight
Fri. & Sat. 10 A.M. To 2 A.M.

3 LITER BOTTLE $1.59
I w. w
TELEPHONE
313-665-7131
313-665-7141

-featuring

Kim Simm onds

RALPH'S MARKET
SPECIALS! On Many Items in Store. Complete Line of Beer, Wine &
Groceries. Lowest Beer & Pop Prices in Town.
709 PACKARD (Near State)

Kim Simmonds, a pioneer of the mid-sixties British white-blues sound will be
playing at The Blind Pig tonight with now Chicago-based band Savoy Brown.
Simmonds emerged as a creative force along with John Mayall and Eric
Clapton at a time when blues was a popular fashion.Times have changed but
Simmonds hasn't and that, of course, is all the fun for enthusiasts of that era.
young men 16 - 35
SYMBOL . ..
"OF THE MAN WHO
RECEIVES IN GIVING"
FRANCISCANS
DIRECTOR OF VOCATIONS, FRANCISCANS, TOR
2006 EDGEWATER PARKWAY
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20903
Please send me the free booklet at no obligation
Name MDM
Address age
free City State_________ Zipd -
booklet (Check preference) Priesthood_____ Brotherhood -

erpepyi

' oeW'
.Lj L

8 PK. 1/2 LITER BOTTLES $1.69
Good thru 3/28/85
$10.00 PANT SA LE
SSELECTED MEN'S & WOMEN'S STYLES
SINCLUDING LEVI'S, LEE & DEE CEE BR ANDS
SURPLUS
Open 7 201 E. WASHINGTON
Days A At 4th Ave.
Week Tou9 43 7
a oier~dSer ou 9437

Hot'1 has no vacancy

By Jeffrey Seller
t nHE HOT'L BALTIMORE, which
-opened at the hands of the Univer-
sity Players Showcase Monday night, is
a beautiful synthesis of human interac-
tion. Like an orchestral symphony, it is
dynamic, with a sense of rhythm and
intonation that is the quintessence of
striking drama.
The audience is confronted with a
F barrage of variegated characters who
inhabit the Hotel Baltimore, a run-
r4down, old hotel "left over" from
society's better days that soon will fall
Sunder the wrecker's ball.
Not unlike the hotel, these people are
te. "left over"-they haven't yet reaped
the rewards from President Reagan's
"trickle down effect." They struggle to
assemble some sort of "good life" in a
society that no longer has a place for
them. Some are old and filled with
memories of the good times they once
E experienced, others are young and
a vibrant, with hopes and dreams to fill
books, and still others are somewhere
in between, stuck with nowhere to go.
As a group they resemble a
family-they love, they hate, they hurt,
and most importantly, they need one
another. Their seemingly trivial' in-
teraction makes their lives bearable,
makes the next day one for which it is
worth waking up. -
. The conductor of this symphony is
.director Gary Garrison, a doctoral
student in directing whose dissertation,
incidentally, concerns Hot'L's
x; playwright. Garrison has neatly woven
the human interaction with such finesse
and sensitivity that we almost forget we
are in the theatre, and for a moment,
t actually believe we are sitting in an old
hotel watching people.
It is not the riveting storyline, lut
- rather a potpourri of rebels, cynics, and
idealists that incites our interest.
These aspirations are clearly reflec-
ted in the three prostitutes which
inhabit the hotel.
Terry McCarthey, as an ebullient
young prostitute who possesses a
special fondness for our railroad
Ghouhes: a i

system, projects an effervescent young
woman with the ability to persever,
never losing the lope which guides her,
all the while managing to play den
mother to the other people at the hotel.
April, played by Chris Barry, con-
trasts well with the optimism of McCar-
thy's character. April is a lewd, past-
her-prime prostitute, whose tainted-
ness from years of being kicked around,
manifests itself as sarcasm and
cynicism. Her biting commentaries,
projected with gusto, are hysterical,
but reflect a woman who has endured
misery.
The third prostitute, Suzy, played by
Gayle Cohen, is endowed with a
vivacious, irresistable spirit. She seeks
to find the rewards.she deserves, asser-
ting, "I need love," as she journeys off
to live with another pimp. And if she
doesn't find it there, she will keep on
looking, again and again.
At first, the Hot'L Baltimore may
seem a depressing play, shedding a dim
light on today's realities. These derelic-
ts appear to go nowhere, and will
probably never find their way to their
promised land. Yet, they are sur-
vivors-they don't wallow in self
pity-they will make it to tomorrow and
the next day, and they will find momen-
ts of happiness along the way. We ad-
mire their ability to persist more than
we feel sorry for them.
To its credit, the play utilizes a soun-
dtrack of pop songs that connect it to
the here-and-now in much the same
way as the Big Chill soundtrack connec-
ted that film to the 1960's. Songs like
"Girls Just Wanna Have Fun," "Out
Here on My Own," and "She Works
Hard for the Money," project mood and
style, and provide vitality to the play.
And Sam Harris' gutsy rendition of
''Somewhere Over the Rainbow,'
provides us with an ever meaningful
theme song for Kansas, The Hotel
Baltimore, or wherever.
Hot'L Baltimore will be performed
through March 17 in the Trueblood
Theatre in the Freize Building. Per-
formances begin at 8:00 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, and at 2:00 p.m. on
Sunday. Tickets are $3.00 and can be
obtained at the door.
ightmarefilm
cast of nonactors through the motions,
aims his camera, and slaps it all
together. The film could easily be the
improvisation of a couple of nerdy thir-
teen-year-olds fooling around in their
basement with dad's super-8 on a rainy
Saturday afternoon. .
The fact is, if you've seen the com-
mercials you've literally seen the best
moments of The Ghoulies, and can
safely (and wisely) spend your time
and money elsewhere. Thou hast been
warned.
:e eg"

SAT. & SUN. FIRST SHOW ONLY $2.00
$ I O With This Entire Ad $1.00 Off Any $4.00
Admission. 1 or 2 Tickets. Good All-
OFF Features thru 3/21/85
me...... mo amemem.. Ue*e*em *U*ememe " U@*U*O*ESE"E
GEORGE ORWELL'S '.
JHN RICHARD
FRI. MON. 455, 710 930
SA 2 40455,710 FRI. &SAT.
SU. 2:0 4 4559 0AT MIDNIGHT ®?

I

7 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS INCL....
BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR-ROLAND JOFFE BEST ACTOR-SAM WATERSON
THE KILLING
FRIMn d15 -n ov; FIELDS ®i FRI. & SAT.

F

-Ml., VMUN'. 4:15f:UU, WJ
SAT., SUN. 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:35

AT MIDNIGHT

SNEAK PREVIEW:
SAT. AT 9:30P.M.
- AND -
SUN. AT 7:10P.M.
TWO MOVIES FOR THE PRICE OF ONE
Sat. attend "1984" at 7:10 P.M. and Stay
for SNEAK FREE.
Sun. attend the 7:10 SNEAK and stay for the
9:30 P.M. show of "1984" FREE!

i

INTERDISCIPLINARY DEPARTMENT
OF INFORMATION SCIENCE
M~iaster of Science
In Information Science
A 36-credit-hour professional program that
prepares students for entry into the field of
data/information processing based on computer
technology. For admission to the' program you
must have some preparation in programming,
matheniatics, statistics, and behavioral science.
MSlS graduates are employed as:
* Systems Analysts
* Programmer/Analysts
* Telecommunications Specialists
* Human Factors Consultants
For Information telephone or write:
Ann Lee Alexander, Director of Admissions
Box 63 LIS Building
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-5230

By Byron L. Bull
The television spots for The Ghouli
featuring a horde of mischieviou
toothy, very Gremlins-like goblin
looks like it might be innocent schloc
fun on the order of an old Roger C
man or Joe Dante horror-camp piec
But the film is disappointingly ju
another dimwitted, cliche infest
muddle like what you can find wh
flipping through the lower end of t
UHF dial late on a Saturday night.,
The film concerns a young m
named Jonathan (Peter Liapis) w
inherits a dilapitated mansion from
long lost parents and, while poki
around the basement, finds assort
bits of occult paraphenalia. Amo
them is a book of ancient divinatio
and, in short time, to the dismay of
live-in girlfriend and the amusement
his friends, he's locked himself dow
stairs, fervently chanting Latin g
berish over a chalk scrawled p
tagram. Jonathan succeeds in co
juring up a whole bestiary of slime
grotesque little creatures, the Ghoul
of the title, who do a lot of mer
chuckling and coughing as they sca
per about the household, preying up
Jonathan's friends.
There isn't anything here, rising c
pses, dueling wizards, or gratuitio

es,
us,
ns,
ky
or-
ce.
ust
ed
ile
he
an
ho
his
ng
ed
ng
ins
his
of
rn-
ib-
en-
on-
ey,
ies
rry
m-
on
or-
)us

Sunday, March 17 3:00 P.M.
"IMAGES of the HOLOCAUST in
LITERATURE"
Sdra Ezrachi, Lecturer at Hebrew University in Jeru
salem and author of By Words Alone; the Holocaust in
Literature and Anita Norich, Assistant Professor of En-
glish Literature at The University of Michigan.
ORIGINAL MUSICAL THEME to the words of Hanah
Senesh's As/hrei Hagafrur, composed by Mr. Doron
Levinson and arranged by Mr. Keith Orr will be per-
formed on Sunday, March 17 to open the Sixth
Annual Conference on the Holocaust.
7&9:00 P.M.
"DAVII," first feature film about the Holocaust
to be made by a German Director. Winner Best Film
Award, Berlin Film Festival (Peter Lilienthal). Hill
Street Cinema, $2.00.
Monday, March 18 7:30 P.M.
"CHILDREN of the HOLOQCAUST"
DeborahDwork, author of Children With A Star, a
work in progress about the life of Jewish children in
Nazi-occupied Europe, their physical, social and mental
condition. Ms. Dwork is Visiting Professor of History
at the University of Michigan on leave from the
Smithsonian.
"PERPETRATORS & VICTIMS:
The Choices They Had"
PRESENTATION BY SURVIVOR, Mr. Alex Ehrmann.

Tuesday, March 19 7:30 P.M.
"AUTHENTJC and UNAUTHENTIC
RESPONSES to the Holocaust"
Emil L. Fackenheim, author of nine books including
God's Presence in History, Jewish Return into History
and most recently To Mend the World. He is currently
Professor of Jewish Thought at the Institute of Con-
temporary Jewry, of the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem.
V ednesday, March 20 8:00 P.M.
GEMINI, THE WELL-KNOWN FOLK MUSIC
TEAM OF Sandor andLaszlo Slomovits, will perform
popular songs and cantorial works from Eastern
Europe. These will be accompanied by readings from
Hasidic tales of the Holocaust. A Reception will follow
the performance.
SPONSORS
" B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation " Centerbury Loft "
Temple Beth Emeth " Campus Chapel " Jewish Com-
munity Council of Washtenaw County *"Office of the
Vice-President for Academic Affairs " Beth Israel Con-
gregation " Office of Ethics and Religion " Lord of
Light Lutheran Church "Michigan Student Assembly "
Program in Judaic Studies " Ann Arbor New Jewish
Agenda " Alice Lloyd " Guild House "
All events will take place at Hillel,
1429 Hill St. Call Hillel at 663-3336
for more information.

-MMMMmi

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