100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 15, 1985 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w w

w w

w

w

mw-

-W.

T

F I R S
R U
AMADEUS
Director Milos Forman's idea of depicting Mozart
as a pop star is a clever premise, but the screenplay
never pans out and what is meant to be irreverance
is merely irrelevance. In the end the film ends up
totemizing Mozart with all the same excessive and
pompous empty praise it originally sets out to super- a
sede. You can, if you want, just close your eyes and
enjoy the score. 8:45 at the Movies as Briarwood,
Briarwood mall.
BEVERLY HILLS COP
Eddie Murphy goes through his usual fast jiving,
smart ass routines (albeit a' little more
whitewashed) in a comedy/thriller about a Detroit
police detective who goes to California in search of
his friend's murderer. This is clearly Murphy's
vehicle, an open forum for him to improvise in front
gf the camera while the rest of the cast just stands
there and plays it straight. Murphy's antics are
lowbrow but his naturally likable presence and fast
timing make for some easy, lightweight giggles,
though you're always very conscious how shabbily
slapped together the whole movie is. 7:00 and 9:30 at
the Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall.
THE BREAKFAST CLUB
Molly Ringwald stars in this comic-poignant look
at the complexities of high school life. Written and
directed by John Hughes, whose last film Sixteen
Candles, was a flawed but at times inspired look at 1
those same themes. At the State Theater, 231 S.
State. 662-6264. Also at the Wayside Theater,
3020 Washtenaw Ave.
THE FALCON AND THE SNOWMAN
Timothy Hutton and Sean Penn play two American
teenagers involved in an intricate scheme to sell
CAMPUS

government secrets to the KGB. Based on a true
story. At the Campus Theater, 1214S. University.
FANTASIA
Technically impressive, but devoid of any
brilliance. this rerelease print has been slightly
edited, dropping out some of the annoyingly inane
narration, and features a newly recorded, but
distractingly loud digital soundtrack. At the State
Theater, 2315S. State.
FALLING IN LOVE
Robert De Niro and Meryl Streep fall in love,
audiences fall asleep. It would take a sharp script
and a sensative director to make two adulterers into
sympathetic characters, Falling in Love lacks both.
7:00 at the Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall.
FAST FORWARD
Another "new musical", this one concerns a group
of teenage dancers from Sandusky, Ohio who travel
to New York to participate in a national talent con-
test. Directed by Sidney Poitier (Stir Crazy, Hanky
Panky) and univiewed at presstime. At the Fox
Village Theater, 375 N. Maple. 769-1300.
THE GODS MUST BE CRAZY
An African bushman sees an empty Coke bottle
tossed out of a passing airplane fall to earth at his
feet, and assuming it to be the lost property of the
gods, decides to go about returning it. This African
import is technically very crude, but is the most
ingeniously funny and charming comic gem since
Woody Allen's early features. Pure, undiluted
laughs, a very rare and special treat whose growing
cult popularity is easily understandable. 7:10 and
9:30, at the Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall.
JOHNNY DANGEROUSLY
Michael Keaton plays a loveable mobster in this
blunt witted parody. Hell must be a double feature of
this with City Heat. 7:00 and 9:30, the Movies at
Briarwood, Briarwood Mall.
HEAVEN HELP US
Yet another coming of age comedy set in the six-
ties, this one situated in a parochial school. Features
a cast of young unknows but with cameos by Donald
of the nominees won. (Hill Street Cinema; 1429 Hill, 7
p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
ROMAN HOLIDAY (William Wyler, 1953)
Audrey Hepburn won an Oscar for her performan-
ce as a princess who escapes from the palace and
goes touring Rome, where she finds newspaperman
Gregory Peck and his friend Eddie Albert. (Ann Ar-
bor Film Coop, Cinema Guild, and Cinema 2, Aud. A,
7 p.m.)
THE PHILADELPHIA STORY (George Cukor, 1940)
A good double feature for globetrotters. Another
Hepburn, Katharine, is the star of this one. Her wed-
ding is turned into a screwball comedy when ex-
husband Cary Grant and journalist James Stewart
check in-without reservations. (Cinema Guild,
Cinema 2, Ann Arbor Film Coop; Aud. A, 9:15 p.m.)
TRADING PLACES (John Landis, 1983)
Traveling from one end of Philadelphia to the other
becomes difficult this evening as this second movie
taking place in Philadelphia tonight is in a different
location. The trip would be worthwhile, though, as
this is a very amusing movie. Dan Ackroyd and Ed-
die Murphy trade places as part of a nature vs. nur-
ture between Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche.
(Alternative Action; MLB 3,7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
SPLASH (Ron Howard, 1984)
A very endearing comedy. Darryl Hannah is a
mermaid who goes on an excursion to New York
City, where she becomes attracted to Tom Hanks.
The relation is rather deja vu as the two had encoun-
tered each other earlier when Hanks went to Cape
Cod with mom and dad. Also with John Candy and
Eugene Flaherty. (Mediatrics; MLB 4, 7:30 p.m.,
9:30)
REPO MAN (Alex Cox, 1984)
When I returned from my pilgrimage to the Ann
Arbor Theater to see this last year, I was distinctly
unsure as to if I had had a good time or not. I still
don't know. It is an unsettling mix of aliens and car
repossessers and cult parents. Even with all the
definitely funny comedies on tap this evening, I think
the best bet is this more unusual item. (Ann Arbor
Film Coop; Cinema 2, and Cinema Guild; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 7 p.m., 8:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.)

Sutheriana, John Heard, and Wallace Shawn. At the
Fox Village Theater, 375 N. Maple. 769-1300.
THE KILLING FIELDS
Unfocused but at times very powerful film about a
New York Times correspondent (played by Sam
Waterson) and his Cambodian assistant- Haing S.
Ngor) who are trapped in Cambodia during the Kh-
mer Rouge's genocidal revolution of 1975. For his fir-
st feature, director Roland Joffe, keeps a clean, tight
control over each individual secenes, but lacks a
crucial overall sense for structure and the film
flounders toward the end. Still, it's a very worth-
while, important film. Ann Arbor Theater, 210 S. Fif-
th Ave.
MICKI & MAUDE
Only Blake Edwards could conceive of polygamy
as suitable material for a feature comedy, and only
Dudley Moore could be hustled into starring in it.
7:00 and 9:45 at the Fox Village Theater, 375 N.
Maple.
PLACES IN THE HEART
Sally Fields plays a Texas widow trying to hold on-
to the family farm during the depression. A con-
fused, but not altogether bad bit of sentimentality by
Robert Benton (ofKramer Vs. Kramer). At the
Wayside Theater, 3020 Washtenaw Ave.
MRS. SOFFEL
Victorian love affair between a prison warden's
wife (Diane Keaton) and an inmate on Murderer's
Row (Mel Gibson) that's inspired by a true story.
Directed by Australian Gillian Armstrong (of By
Brilliant Career fame) and though unviewed at press
time, it's been garnering favorable reviews
elsewhere. At the Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood
Mall.
STARMAN
Jeff Bridges gives an impressively delicate per
formance as a stranded extraterrestrial who taket.
on the form of a young widow's (Karen Allen) late
husband. The script, which owes a lot to Close En-
counters, is riddled with loose ends and cheap con-

trivan
prisini
sense
sweet
7:30 an
wood]
STRAI
Jim
beatsd
in sear
wave
calcul
film's
tered
pressi
strang
Fifth A
TURI(
timc
young
corrup
At the
VISIO
Somf
school
for the
presst
WITNE
Aust
subjec
spiritu
man,t
with a
tive (
gangli
presst
record
Year (
good a
Mall.
Con

F I

L

MS

The ]
tiue
7family
army r
are inl
militar
titles.(

.1

ANNIE HALL (Woody Allen, 1978)
Welcome to the first ever attempt at themed Cam-
pus Cinema. To start it off, Woody Allen and Diane
Keaton travel to the peak of friendship and back in a
very nice, touching, hilarious comedy. It won some
Oscars, and is well worth seeing. (Michigan Theater
Foundation; Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 11 p.m.)
MANHATTAN (Woody Allen, 1979)
Allen and Keaton again, this time joined by Meryl
Streep and Mariel Hemingway. This, too, is well wor-
th seeing. Streep is about to tell all in a book. Ex-
husband Allen is upset, and he has to subway across
town a lot trying to juggle a relationship with the
other two women in the cast. (Michigan Theater
Foundation; Michigan Theater, 9 p.m.)
BOAT PEOPLE (Ann Hui, 1983)
The Ann Arbor Premiere of a movie that is being
billed as Hong Kong New Wave Cinema. It is a fic-
tionalized account of the boat people who took an
ocean voyage to escape from the Communist regime
in Vietnam only to find further difficulties. A
Japanese reporter is the vehicle to get the story
going. Chinese with subtitles. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7
p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
LA CAGE AUX FOLLES (Eduardo Molinaro, 1979)
A comedy that was one of the inspirations for the
current Broadway show, a traveling company of
which is now playing in Detroit. The main plotline
deals with two transvestite owners of a nightclub
who want to make a. good impression on thiir son's
bride to be. French with subtitles. (Ann Arbor Film
Coop; Nat. Sci. Aud., 7 p.m., 9 p.m.)
THE ROSE (Mark Rydell, 1979)
A stunning performance by Bette Midler is the best
part of this excellent movie. Midler plays a rock star
who travels across the country in a chartered air-
plane to perform concerts in front of cheering fans
who.have travelled long distances. At the same time,
too much drugs, sex, and rock and roll conveys her to
a tragic ending. (Alternative Action; MLB 4, 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m.)
AS
ANNIE HALL (Woody Allen, 1978)
You will have to travel back in time to yesterday's
listing for details on this top-notch entertainment.
(Michigan Theater Foundation; Michigan.Teater, 7
p.m., 11 p.m.)
MANHATTAN (Woody Allen, 1979)
Details of this funny black-and-white voyage to the
island will also be found in yesterday's listing.
(Michigan Theater Foundation; Michigan Theater, 9
p.m.)
LENNY (Bob Fosse, 1974)
Numerous Academy Award nominations were
given to this film. Dustin Hoffman got one for his por-
trayal of controversial comic Lenny Bruce. Fosse
got one for his directing, and Valerie Perrine got one
for her performance. The trip to the porothy Chan-
dler Pavillion was a bummer, though, because none

ANGEl
Jean
almost
Unable
(Ann A
MILDR
The
screen.
mother
daught
Aud. A,
BLADE
The f
over th
labor o
Earthv
Ford hi
to atter
future
one. Th
ded. (M
DOG D/
One h
to rob a
change
situatio
change
Based c
Lumet
the cha
(Hill Sti
THE PA
Rod S
was vic
still try
Lumet I
will hav
Law Sti
p.m.)
ANIMA
Fabei
because
John Be
always
tasteles
not go
schedul
make r
Theater
p.m.)

THE BEST OF WARNER BROTHERS CARTOON
CLASSICS
A trip down memory lane for the entire family.
Warner Brothers cartoons had folks like Bugs Bun-
ny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Road Runner (Beep-
beep), and Yosemite Sam. Some or all should be on
hand for this assortment. So get a bag of carrots,.
bring some wabbit stew in a thermos and get ready
to listen to Mel Blanc do voices for just about all of
them. (Michigan Theater Foundation; Michigan
Theater, 1;30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.)
THE VULTURE (Yaky Yosha,1981)
This film stirred up a lot of controversy in Israel,
where it was made, so it hopped on an El Al jet and
landed in Ann Arbor. The reason for the controversy
was its stand against the Yom Kippur War. Two
strands come together-one of a family remem-
bering a son killed in the war and the other of an ex-
soldier who makes a profit selling albums to remem-
ber by. Hebrew with subtitles. (Hill Street Cinema;
1429 Hill, 8 p.m.)
KANAL (Andrzej Wajda, 1957)
This film had to acquire a visa to leave Poland. It is

Murphy: wheels and deals in
'Trading Places'
set in Warsaw in the middle of World War II, and it
depicts the attempt of some Polish patriots to leave
the city behind as they attempt to escape from the
Nazis. Their method of travel is the city's sewer
system. The film was filmed in Polish. It will either
have subtitles or be dubbed into English. (Ann Arbor
Film Coop; MLB4, 7p.m.)
TEN (Blake Edwards, 1979)
Dudley Moore becomes obsessed with the beauty
of Bo Derek, and promptly proceeds to enter a mid-
life crisis. He sees his travel agent to make
arrangements for a trip to Mexico, where Bo is going
on her honeymoon. He neglects to get a plane ticket-
for close friend Julie Andrews, and that upsets her
very much. Definitely worth seeing. Before the
movie, an Italian buffet will be served at 5:30. Will
they play Bolero? (University Club; U-Club, 7:10
p.m.)
S 1
GAZA GHETTO: PORTRAIT OF A PALESTINIAN
REFUGEE FAMILY (Pea Holmquist, Joan Mandel,
and Pierre Borklund, 1984)

Si12 Weekend/FridayFebpruary15;95

W..e..nd/Fi

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan