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February 15, 1985 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-15

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 15, 1985 -Page 3
Judge speaks on equality issue

By GREG MEENHAN
Closing the International Women's Decade, Federal Judge
Ruth Ginsburg said yesterday that laws involving men and
women in the United States are changing due to societal
changes.
"Changes in the law always come after changes in
society," said Ginsburg, in her Hutchins Hall speech. The
best way for women to reach equality is for men to take more
responsibility in child rearing, she said.
SHE CITED a case where a woman was denied a job
because she had children of pre-school age. After lengthy
supreme court trial, the case was decided in the woman's
favor.
Ginsburg also said that men have fostered the idea of
discrimination by developing laws designed to protect the
"weaker of the species."
On abortion, Ginsburg said, "I have to say that a woman
has the right to decide what happens to her body." She said
she was surprised that the legalization of abortion caused
such a violent reaction.
"IT'S TERRIBLE that the backlash to the Supreme

Court's decision will only affect only one class of
people-poor women," said Ginsburg.
Both the state House and Senate have voted to ban
medicade abortions.
Kim Lane Schippele, political science and sociology in-
structor, was responsible for Ginsburg's appearance. She
said, "I thought it was very appropriate that she spoke on the
closing of the International Woman's Decade. She has been
at the forefront of every important discrimination case that
has come up before the U.S. courts."
Lisa Danto, a nursing school graduate told of reverse
discrimination at the University during the question and an-,
swer period, "I brought it up to the dean in '83 that there was
no men's restroom in the nursing building. They did finally
change and gave the men one room. But last year it was
gone, and there still is no men's restroom."
Judge Ginsburg didn't comment on the situation, instead
she cited other cases of reverse discrimination.
Ginsburg has written for magazines such as Playboy and
Cosmopolitan and has co-authored the book, Sex-Based
Discrimination.

Daily Photo by MATT PETRIE

Nancy Artymovich talks to a member of the Michigan Mime Troupe yesterday at the grand opening of the Union's
ground floor shopping mall. Also demonstrating their services were a slew of student organizations which have their of-
fices in the building. The big event of the day was a contest sponsored by Great Places Travel for two round trip tickets
to anywhere in the continental United States.
Daily staff

Highlight
Don't miss part two of the Regents' meeting at 9 a.m., in the Regents'
Room, Fleming Administration Building.
Films
UM Law School Theatrical Society-Anatomy of a Murder,- 8 p.m.,
Lawyers' Club Lounge, Law Quad.
Alt Act-The Rose, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Michigan Theater-Annie Hall, 7 & 11 p.m.; Manhattan, 9 p.m., Michigan
Theater.
AAFC-La Cage Aux Folles, 7 & 9p.m., Nat. Sci. Building.
C2-Boat People, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Performances
Ark-RFD Boys, 8 p.m., 637 Main Street, Ark.
U-M Flint-Mark Braun, jazz pianist, "At 8 in the Brewery," 8 p.m.,
University Center Brewery; "Endgame," play, 8p.m., U-M Flint Theater.
School of"Music-E. Kim, saxophone recital, 6 p.m.; Piano Concertos
recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; Contemporary Directions Ensemble, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Lecture Hall, Rackham Building; Chamber Choir and Chamber
Orchestra, Thomas Hilbish, conductor, 8p.m., Hill Auditorium.
Performance Network-"Vatzlav," political satire play, 8 p.m., 408 W.
Washington.
Speakers
Anthropology Colloquium-Lisa Sattenspiel, "The Influence of Infection
and Predation on Early Hominid Evolution," 4 p.m., room 4051, LSA
Building.
Guild .House*-Ann Marie Coleman, "El Salvador and Honduras: Pieces in
the Central American Puzzle," noon, 802 Monroe, Guild House.
Engineering-Richard Sacks, "Plasmas in Chemistry," 3:45 p.m., White
Auditorium, Cooley Building.
Astrofest 144-Jim Loudon, "Strange Stars and Possible Planets," 3 & 7:30
pm, Aud.. 3, MLB.
putin Center-Forrest Hartman, "Tell-A-Graf," 1:30 p.m., room 141,
Business Administration Building.
Center for Research, Learning, and Teaching-"What Leads to Success in
the Classroom," 12:10 p.m, rooms 4 & 5, Michigan League.
South & South East Asian Studies-Madhav Deshpande, "Sounds of Poetic
Sanskrit," 12:10 p.m., Lane Hall Commons, Lane Hall.
Meetings
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., Memorial Christian
Church, corner of Hill and Tappan Streets.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Study-7:30 p.m., basement, University Refor-
med Church, 1001 E. Huron Road.
Korean Christian Fellowship-Bible study, 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Union Counselling Services-Dissertation support group, 8:30 a.m., room
3100, Union Counselling Services Building.
International Students Fellowship-7 p.m., Huron Hills Baptist Church,
3150 Glacier Way.
Miscellaneous
Artspace-Open house, 7 p.m., Union.
Natural Resources Club-The Paul Bunyan Ball, 8 p.m., Ballroom, Union.
Hillel-Women in Jewish Law Ometz Shabbaton, 5:45 p.m., Hillel.
International Folk Dance Club-Greek, instruction, 7:30 p.m., open
request, 9 p.m., Angell Elementary School, 1608 S. University.
Women's Basketball-Michigan vs. Iowa, 7 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Women's Swimming-Michigan vs. Eastern Michigan, 7 p.m., Matt Mann
Pool.
Men's Indoor Track-Central collegiate championships, 11 a.m., Track
and Tennis Building.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

approves
'free drop'
option
(Continued from Page1)
answer to the paper's problems.
"We haven't made any tremendous
efforts to increase circulation. It's
ridiculous. We're not committed
enough to ourselves, the Daily, or our
readers to exhaust our options," said
managing editor Georgea Kovanis.
Kovanis said she would like to see the
Daily do a market survey of its readers
and get a circulation manager before
resorting to free distribution.
CHASE SAID that regardless of the
distribution method a market analysis
will be done.
The Daily's business manager, Liz
Carson, saidthat the paper's marketing
manager already serves in a capacity
similar to that of a circulation manager
and that the name is only a technicality.
Circulation is down several hundred
subscribers over last year, Carson said.
"IT'S A VERY good business move
and a very good editorial move," Car-
son said, referring to the switch to free
distribution.
Carson said she feels the move will
get more students to read the paper.
"There's a real pride in having students
talking about the Daily around cam-
pus," she said.
The 95-year-old history of the Daily is
marked by editorial freedom,
recognition as one of the top college
papers in the nation, and paid subscrip-
tions. '
Losing that quality worries some
staffers.
"The main problem I have with free
drop is that when the last staff on a
paid Daily leaves, the tradition of the
Daily as a competitor with the Ann Ar-
bor News and the Detroit Free Press
will no longer be there," said reporter
Marla Gold.
"The quality is bound to suffer.
People will get lazy because they will
know people will be reading the paper
regardless of the editorial quality,"
Gold said.
Learn to live with someone
who's living with cancer.
Call us.
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
PADRE ISLAND
What's the difference between
the Banzai Pipeline and the Sand-
Dollar HotLine?
They're both fast. But the Pipe-
line is a high-risk surfing spot, while
the SandDollar HotLine is a risk-
free rental reservation number.
If you're going to vacation on
South Pdre Isand, cll our toll freep

Bursley
committee
q ues tions
$2,457
(Continued from Page 1)
Discrepancies were found by the
treasurer and president, in consultation
with Caroline Gould, the building direc-
tor and the Board which were turned
over to security and the police, Siler
said.
AS VICE-president and head of the
properties and distribution committee
in charge of repairing and transporting
BOG equipment, Blalock had the
authority to rent cars and write out
checks for equipment repairs, Siler
said.
A disbursement authorization form
has to be filled out for BOG transac-
tions. Officials of BOG could formerly
write out the check to some
organization or individual and their
own signature would suffice, said Bill
Wilcox, the current BOG vice-
president. But, he said, because of the
controversy the form now requires two
signatures.
On Jan. 21, the treasurer received
four rental car receipts from accoun-
ting services. The rental cars were not
used solely to transport equipment
because of the milages and length of
time, said Siler. He said that the cars
were used for several days over
Thanksgiving and Christmas, with
milages ranging from 100 to 600 miles.
"This is when we knew something
had to be done to halt the continuing
mismanagement of funds," Siler said.

i*
UNCOMMON WOMEN
AND OTHERS
Presented by
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
main street stage
338 South Main Street
Feb.1, 2, 7 8 14 15 16
for more information call 662-9405

THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY
And they're both repre-
- sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
f a system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

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