100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 08, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS
Friday, February 8, 1985

The Michigan Daily

Page 5

Video festival

creates an accessible

art form

By Bob King

I

Video, video, look what it becomes.
From its early, dicotomous existence,
harboring nothing between professional
network glitter and pathetic VCR epics
of junior's first drool, video's realm is
currently flowing inward to the
bourgeois realm of artistry. We see,
Records
Flash and the Pan-Early
Morning Wake-Up Call (Epic)
Remember polyester? Remember
gold chains? Flash and the Pan's new
album Early Morning Wake-Up Call
takes us back to the heyday of leisure
suits and the Hustle. Actually, Flash is
a perfectly competent band with a
sound thoroughly grounded in the '70's.
There would be nothing wrong with
that, except that the band's sounds
aren't particularly inspired. In fact,
they're only occasionally amusing.
The title cut's breezy lyrics are an ef-
fective satire on the music industry:
You make the charts/And all the
hangers-on/were always hanging
on. Unfortunately, that's the only
good thing about the song. Like all the
albums up-tempo tunes (and that's)
most of them). Wake-Up Call suffers
from a heavy rhythm section com-
plemented by thudding drums and a
blunt synthesizer.
The first side of the album has a one-
pitch, party sound that can be fun, but
usually isn't. The only surprise is
"Barking at the Moon," a less conven-
tional song with a jazzy chord change at
the, chorus. The song sounds like Steely
Dan with a rougher edge and a bitterly
sardonic view of love.
The second side shows Flash at their
best. The pace slows down and the
arrangements are tighter. The songs
deal with faithless lovers (What else is
new?) and life on the road. "On the
Road,"in fact, is one of their better
songs.
"Look at that Woman Go" is one of
the album's best songs, due mostly to
its sparse arrangement and even spar-
ser lyrics "Sunday morning. /Crazed
head. /Empty bottles/dry the bed."
The song builds the perfect sinister
mood in yet another tale of soured love.
We've heard it all before, but the band's
style can keep us interested for one
more listening.
-A rona Pearlstein
The Kinks-Word of Mouth
(Arista) J
Shocking, isn't it, that the Kinks could
possibly be so good after so long-after
their various long doldrum periods, af-
ter the big sell-out. Word of Mouth is far
from a return to the high-tide days of
Arthur or even "Do You Remember
Walter?", but it extends the sell-out
process into the realm of near-sublime
professionalism.
The title song and "Do It Again"
manage to, straddle saleably BIG, FM-
rock riffs within a loveably intelligent
melodic context, no doubt much due to
lead doughboy Ray Davies' always ex-
quisite vocals. "Good Day" is a
classically resigned poptune with a
litling chorus, funny ajd sad and smart
and all that. Dave Davies's "Livin' on a
Thin Line" is nearly as piognant as a
farewell-Britannica ode. "Massive
Reducation," "Sold Me Out" and
"Guilty" ably prop up the FM rock
clothesline and will serve their purpose
should a Kinks tour emerge.
Despite an unconscionable amount of
temporal and monetary temptation to
surrender entirely to the FM-clone
scene, the Kinks have held onto some
blues/rock credibility, and the
Ray/Dave production is ace. Too arch
to ever be truly a populist band-they
regard their audience with too much
frank curiousity for that-the Kinks
Survive as brilliant mimics of the

stadium/FM need who can (thankfully)
never quite appear dumb enough to
look like the mean it. They've been, on-
and-off, so enormously enjoyable for so
long that the failure of Word of Mouth to
sink from sheer baggage weight is
almost more pleasing and significant
then the music itself.
--Dennis Harvey

therefore it grows. three day show began what looks like a by the exponentially greater facilities required to show videos on the big guilty.
Ann Arbor, it appears, has turned out successful tradition. of the professional screen, but also cash prizes and air- Another change in this year's
tobe one of the video's brighter buds. The goal of Festival Founder and To solve the ever-present problem of travel to Ann Arbor for the finalists. Festival will be the categories of com-
Last year's National Student Video Director Alec Friedman, who, not co- funding, Friedman went straight to the The three-day Festival was viewed petition. Last year's open format ser-
Festival, the first student festival on incidentally, is also the Executive corporate sources that are involved in by over 1000 people last spring, in spite ved as sort of a test sample of styles
this orb, generated nation-wide atten- producer of the U. of M.'s Media video's blossoming, gaining sponsor- of conflicts with the University's final produced. "There were no categories,"
tion and received 101 entries from 25 Resource Center, Michigan Media, was ships from Sony Broadcast, Allied Film exam period. This year, Friedman has Friedman explains, "we just had to
states. Featuring an excellent panel of to generate publicity for student video & Video, CBS-Fox Video, and General moved the Video-Fest forward to Mar- open things up and see what would hap-
judges, including PBS producer and 5- producers through the inception of a Electric. Their support not only ch 29 and 30 to allow more students to pen." What happened was the NSVF
time Emmie winner David Connell, the "student Emmies," one not dominated provided the hyper-expensive projector attend, and those attending not to feel See LOCAL, Page 6

The first time
seems like, the worst time,
but it's the one time

NEW MUSIC
FOR THE
NEW YEAR

TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX Presents
AN INTERSCOPE COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTION A BOB CLARK FILM
TIMOTHY HUTTON
TURK 182
ROBERT URICH KIM CATTRALL
ROBERT CULP DARREN McGAVIN and PETER BOYLE
Director of Photography REGINALD H. MORRIS, C.S.C.,
Executive Producers PETER SAMUELSON and ROBERT CORT
Produced by TED FIELD and RENE DUPONT
Screenplay by JAMES GREGORY KINGSTON and DENIS HAMILL
& JOHN HAMILL Story by JAMES GREGORY KINGSTON
Directed by BOB CLARK PANAVISION' rxNS ELT STEAREO®
12 &aev ~Aloac 1C~'0G~treolo Are StroontN GoooordhfDre GSpeuat
orPG -13 M a e forA e IndpTo, f frClorren Once3 <1385 TWENTETH
Same Maea May Be inapproprte for Young CMow- ~ CENTURY FOX

' \N.:\f C .WU '. 4amti' KiO ihWnnvk..a..vwv'a w . :.ifii3e.4 ',li2.W.law'vx. 'tawSla£11Y: " ' 4 '$if u ld.WxW .

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan