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February 01, 1985 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-01

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 1, 1985

INSIDE PLAY LEADS BLUE TO 76-52 ROUT

'Cats roll over and

(Continued from Page 1)
conference, 15-3 overall.
Michigan jumped out to a 6-0 lead and
kept the Wildcats at bay the rest of the
game, never really being challenged. A
ten-point halftime margin, 37-27, grew
to 18 points at various times in the
second half, before climbing ultimately
to the 24 point differential at the end.
"Michigan can do a lot of things that
can make a team look bad," said Nor-
thwestern coach Rich Falk. "That's the
first team that's made our defense look
really shaky."
REMARKABLY, the contest did not
turn into a rout in the first half. The
Wolverines shot a blistering 67 percent
from the field, 90 percent from the
charity stripe, and blazed out of control
under the boards, snagging 13 rebounds
to Northwestern's four.
Wildcat Shon Morris, a 6-9 freshman,
provided the only spark for North-
western in the first half. Coming off the
bench the 215-pound forward peppered
the nets for 14 points with seven of ten
shooting from the field.
"Northwestern always throws a sur-
Big Ten Standings

prise at us," said Wolverine coach Bill
Frieder. "Morris got away from us in
the first half, but we took care of that."
ADDED FALK I was amazed we
were down only 10 points at the half.
Without Morris that would have been a
blowout. I had a sigh of relief that we
were only down by ten."
In the second half, Michigan con-
tained Morris to a mere three points,
but that was nothing compared to the
burning the Blue gave Wildcat bigman
Andre Goode.
The Wolverines smothered Goode all
evening as the 6-10 senior hit a
miserable one of 11 shots from the field.
Goode had four turnovers as well.
"ANDRE GOT OFF to a rough
start," said Falk. "I think he was too
high tonight, I think he came too ready
to play. He just didn't get any rewards
for his effort."

The Wolverines meanwhile got a
balanced scoring attack from their
starters. Tarpley had been ill during
the week, having missed practices on
Monday and Tuesday, but that didn't
prevent the 6-11 center from lighting up
the scoreboard with a Michigan-high 16
points.
Antoine Joubert, also out with the flu
during the week, ignited the Michigan
attack with 13 assists.
JOUBERT tallied 10 points while
counterpart Gary Grant notched 12
markers on the evening, including
some of his now patented jump shots.
Forwards Richard Reliford and But-
ch Wade pumped in 12 and 11 points,
respectively
"We didn't play as well today as we
have the previous four games," said

I play
Frieder. "I think the offense kind of
handled itself well. We got some (poin-
ts) out of the halfcourt game, and we
got some out of the transition."
Falk described Michigan as one of the
best teams he's seen thus far this
season, and was particularly impressed
with Joubert, quipping, "I guess he was
in bed two days this week, but if he was
supposed to be sick he sure didn't look
it."
The tenth ranked Wolverines now
take their red-hot medicine show to
Wisconsin tomorrow where they will
face a team almost as anemic as the
Wildcats. Like Northwestern, Wiscon-
sin may get a trial by fire on Saturday.
Another Michigan win would make
the Wolverine's chances for the Big Ten
Title burn even brighter.

dead for 'M'

... And call me in the morning

NORTHWESTERN

Min
Goode ......... 22
Peterson ...... 38
Murray........17
Watts ..........33
Fullen.........37
Morris .........33
Flanagan...... 3
Dixon ..........5
Cucuz ..........4
Petrovic........3
Branch.........2
Richardson.... 2
Joost ...........1

FG/A
1/11
4/6
1/4
3/5
3/7
8/16
1/1
0/1
1/2
0/0
1/2
0/1
0/0

FT/A
0/0
0/1
0/0
4/6
1/2
1/2
0/0
0/0
0/2
0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0

R
2
5
3
2
3
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0

A
4
I
1
6
1
1
0
0
4
1
0
0
0

PF
1
3
3
0
2
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

Pts
2
8
2
10
7
17
2
0
2
0
2
0
0

MICHIGAN
Min FG/A FT/A
Reliford........ 25 5/6 2/2
Wade.......... 30 5/7 1/2
Tarpley........ 33 6/10 4/4
Joubert........ 34 5/9 0/0
Grant ......... 26 6/9 0/0
Henderson .... 19 3/4 2/3
Thompson..15 1/3 0/0
Rockymore.... 14 1/3 3/4
Stoyko......... 3 0/0 0/0
Gibbis......... 1 0/2 0/0

R
3
4
11
3
4
3
2
0
1

A
1
0
3
13
4
1
3
0
0
0

PF Pts
2 12
0 11
3 16
1 10
2 12
2 8
2 2
2 5
1 0
0 0

MICHIGAN ...........
Iowa ..................
Illinois ................
Ohio State .............
Purdue ................
Minnesota .............
Michigan State.......
Indiana ...............
Wisconsin .............
Northwestern .........

Conf
6-2
6-2
6-3
5-3
5-4
4-4
4-4
3-5
1-7
1-7

Overall
15-3
17-4
17-5
13-4
14-5
11-7
13-5
11-7
10-8
5-13

'6
Wade
... five of seven from floor

Team rebounds
TOTALS ...... 200 32/53

4
12/15 36 25 15 76

Halftime Score: MICHIGAN 37, Northwestern 27
Attendance: 6,648

Team rebounds
TOTALS......200 23/56 6/1

21 15 14 52

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Iowa retains

Associated Press
Freshman Gary Grant applies his usual tenacious defense against North-
western's Shawn Watts last night in Evanston. Michigan blew out the Wild-
cats 76-52 to hold onto their share of first place in the Big Ten.
SPOR TS OF THE DAILY:
No. 15 La. Tech

share oJ
BLOOMINGTON (AP) - Iowa, led
by Greg Stokes' 21 points, extended In-
diana's Big Ten losing streak to four
games last night, 72-59, though Hoosier
Coach Bobby Knight returned his
veterans to the starting lineup.
The Hawkeyes increased their overall
record to 17-4 and 6-2 in the Big Ten,
while Indiana fell to 11-7 and 3-5 in the
conference.
KNIGHT, who had benched all his
upperclassmen except 7-foot-2 senior
Uwe Blab in a loss last Sunday at
Illinois in an effort to jolt the team,
reinserted the veterans, including
leading scorer Steve Alford.
Blab bulled his way for 10 of his team-
high 17 points in the second half before
fouling out with 6:11 remaining. Stokes
connected on a pair of free throws to
begin a 8-0 Hawkeye spree which
boosted the Iowa lead form 61-55 to 69-55.
Also hitting double figures for the
Hawkeyes were guards Andre Banks
and Jeff Moe, who had 11 apiece.
Michigan State 77,
Wisconsin 68
MADISON (AP)-Scott Skiles
scored 29 points and sparked two key
first-half Michigan State spurts with his
shooting and passing, leading the Spar-
tans to a 77-68 Big Ten basketball vic-
tory over Wisconsin last night.
Michigan State, 13-5 overall and 4-4 in
the conference, snapped a four-game
losing streak.
Wisconsin, 10-8 and 1-7, lost its seven-
th consecutive contest when a second-
half rally fell short.
Skiles hit a 20-foot jumper, fed back-
court mate Sam Vincent for an alley-
oop dunk and hit two free throws to
ignite a 10-0 spree that put Michigan
State on top for good at 14-6 with 13:14
left in the first half.

rlead
Ohio St. 76, Minnesota 62
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Joe Con-
check grabbed a career-high 10
rebounds and led Ohio State on an early
second-half spurt last night that carried
the Buckeyes to a 76-62 Big Ten basket-
ball victory over Minnesota.
The 6-foot-8 senior, twice ineligible in
his collegiate career, also scored 14
points to help the Buckeyes to their fifth
victory in eight conference games. Ohio
State, posting its ninth straight home
triumph this season, is 13-4 overall.
CONCEHCK scored eight of Ohio
State's first 14 points of the second half,
giving the Buckeyes a 47-34 lead with
less than 16 minutes to play.
Brad Sellers, the Buckeyes' 7-foot
center, and substitute Clarence McGee
led the winners with 15 points apiece.
Big Ten takes own TV
SCHAUMBURG, Ill. (AP)-The Big
Ten Conference will assume production
responsibilities for televising the rest of
the 1985 league basketball games,
Commissioner Wayne Duke said
yesterday.
The Big Ten will produce its first
shows tomorrow, televising the
Michigan-Wisconsin and Michigan
State-Northwestern games, Duke said.
The conference has severed its ties
with the Metrosports Television Net-
work of New Kensington, Pa., due to the
basketball game syndicator's failure to
pay rights fees for the 1985 Big Ten
basketball season, the league office an-
nounced.
Financial details were not disclosed.
"Everything is going to remain the
same, but the production will be done
here," said league spokesman Mark
Rudner.
"We're going to contract with dif-
ferent production companies," he said,
adding that advertising revenues are
expected to cover production costs.

tips Arkar
RUSTON, La. (AP)-Karl Malone,
held to five points in the first half,
scored 21 in the second half last night to
power 15th-ranked Louisiana Tech to an
80-73 Southland Conference basketball
victory over Arkansas State.
In the first meeting this year between
the teams, Arkansas State led by two
points at half-time and resisted Tech's
second half charge until 13:23
remained. That's when Malone fed
Wayne Smith, whose layup gave Tech a
43-42 lead it never again relinquished.
TWO MINUTES later, Allen Davis'
dunk off a steal put Tech up by 51-44
and, seconds after that, Malone's slam-
dunk made it 53-44 and the Bulldogs
were never again in danger.
Tech, rebounding from last
weekend's upset loss to Lamar, im-
proved to 17-2 overall and maintained a
share of the Southland Conference lead
at 4-1.
Led by Malone with 26 points, four of
Tech's starters finished in double
figures-Smith with 13 points, Willie
Bland with 11 and Willie Simmons with
10 points before he fouled out with 1:45
left in the game.
Tim Norman with 16 points, Reggie
Gordin with 13, Alan Smith with 12 and
Mike Todd with 10 points led ASU, now
8-9 and 2-3.
RoziPr in limbo
NEW YORK (AP)-The agent for
former Heisman Trophy winner Mike

1sas, 80-73
Rozier said yesterday that an
agreement had been reached to sign
with the Jacksonville Bulls, but later
said nothing definite had been worked
out with the United States Football
League team.
Riggins shows
he's a true Hog
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Redskins
star John Riggins put on a raucous
display at a formal banquet Wed-
nesday night, at one point urging
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day
O'Connor to "loosen up, Sandy
baby," then passing out on the
ballroom floor and snoring through
a speech by George Bush.
Also at Riggins' table were Justice
O'Connor and her husband, John J.
O'Connor III. A guest said Riggins
repeatedly spoke loudly to Mrs.
O'Connor, several times saying:
"Come on, Sandy baby, loosen up.
You're too tight."
Another guest was Virginia Gov.
Charles Ross, son-in-law of the late
Lyndon Johnson. His spokesman,
George Stoddart, told United Press
International: "The govet'nor said it
was a very memorable evening, and
he doesn't feel it's appropriate to
comment beyond that."

Associated Press

Indiana center Uwe Blab scores easily over Iowa's Greg Stokes in last
night's action as Todd Meyer and Gary Wright of Iowa look on. Blab's 17-
point effort was not enough to stop a 72-59 Iowa win.

Women tankers call the Copp

By JIM GINDIN

I

SPACES STILL AVAILABLE IN
THE FOLLOWING MINI-COURSES:

Aerobic Dance
Bridge
Conversation Skills
For European Travel
Dream Interpretation
Financial Planning

Mime
Pool
Sign Language
Speed Reading
Yoga Meditation

Swimming an educational experience? Well,
sure-if you look at it in a certain way. And in Melin-
da Copp's case, swimming has been just that-a
major part of her education.
Copp has been swimming year-round since being
recruited at age 13 from a local swim camp in nor-
thern Ontario to go to Pinecrest highmschool inFort
Lauderdale, Florida, a private school well known for
both academics and athletics.
"IT WAS EXCITING. It was the beginning of the
realization that things could happen if I put time into
swimming. I saw a lot of potential Olympic swim-
mers, saw the benefits, perks you might say, they
got," Copp said.
She came to Michigan five years ago because it was
closer to her family in London, Ontario, it had a good
swimming program and it offered an education ad-
mired greatly in Canada.
Under former Wolverine coach Stu Isaac, she won
the Big Ten Championship in the 200 yard individual
medley her freshman and sophomore years and the
200 backstroke her sophomore and junior years. She
went on to finish 10th in the backstroke at Nationals in
1981, second in '82 and seventh two years ago after

trials and qualified for the Olympics in Los Angeles
the next month
"THE HIGHLIGHT of my career was making the
Olympic team," said Copp. "But the experience of
my career was at the Olympics. I should have done
better there, but I got caught up in the experience,
sort of let go of what I was supposed to do."
Copp ended up placing 18th in her event, her goal
having been to reach the final eight.

"You should look ahead when something big is
coming up. I learned a lesson there," she said. "I set
a goal to make the finals coming in. Maybe it was
part of the problem. I was afraid of that goal. . . . It put
so much pressure on me that I reached a bad anxiety
level.
"I DON'T EVEN remember the race. I remember
the friendships, the opening and closing
ceremonies.. . . Everything you hear about the frien-
dship and comraderie at the Olympics is true ....
Medals don't symbolize what I've done."
This season, as a senior, she's been named captain
of the swim team. "All our awards are wrapped up in
that selection," said Wolverine coach Peter Lindsay.
Copp tries to set goals both challenging and
realistic. In the Big Ten Championships this coming
spring break she wants to win the 200 backstroke and
the 200 and 400 individual medley races. At the NCAA
meet the end of March she would like to place in the
top three in the backstroke. After the meet, she'll end
her 11-year career in swimming.

"WHEN I'M NO longer training, I'll just relax and
take things a little slower... than the pace of getting
up for training every day at 6 a.m. I'll start looking at
the rest of my life."

i i

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