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January 10, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-10

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 10, 1985
BUT STILL TRAIL NATIONAL A VERAGE
Black SAT's climb three points

NEW YORK (AP)-New figures from The College
Board show that black youngsters are continuing to
improve their Scholastic Aptitude Exam scores
faster than whites, but still remain far below national
averages.
The mean verbal score for the 71,174 blacks taking
the college entrance test during the 1983-84 school
year was 342-a three-point gain from a year earlier,
but still 84 points below the national mean of 426.
THE MEAN math score last year for black studen-
ts was up four points to 373, but still trailed by nearly
a hundred points the national mean of 471.
White students, meanwhile, registered smaller
year-to-year gains, rising to 445 from 443 in the verbal

section, and 487 from 484 in math.
Since 1976, the first year for which statistics are
available, blacks have steadily narrowed the gap
between their combined math and verbal SAT scores
and those of white youngsters. Nine years ago,
blacks trailed whites by 258 points, but have now
lessened the gap to 217 points.
THE NEW statistics were contained in an annual
report, "Profiles, College-Bound Seniors, 1984"
which broke down student SAT performance by race
and ethnic groups.
Reginald Wilson, head of the Washington-based
American Council on Education's office of minority
concerns said he found the statistics "not really en-

couraging."
"Basically what we see is one of the ironies of
American education. There is improvement by
minorities on standardized tests, but the number of
minorities going on to higher education is going
down," he said. In 1976, he said, 1.03 million blacks
attended institutions of higher education, 9.4 percent
of total national enrollment.
Wilson cited the tighter student financial aid
situation under the Reagan administration, but ad-
ded that many states were responding to recent calls
for education reform by stiffening both high school
graduation requirements and state college entrance
requirements.

Battle rages for
(Continued from Page 1)
"Our store has been surprisingly
packed," said Weinberg. "If I would
have stayed in our store for the past
three days, I wouldn't have even known
there was a new competitor."
THIS TERM the U-Cellar will still
give its regular 5 percent discount on all
course textbooks, though now students
and faculty must show a University ID
card in order to receive the special
price.
According to Weinberg, the U-Cellar
has been promoting their 5 percent
discount on all course textbooks in
hopes the students will chose price over
convenience. Yet Weinberg admitted
that the U-Cellar has depleted much of
its supply of used books since the used
books normally sell faster than new
copies.
On the other side of campus, Tom
Musser, manager of Ulrich's said it is
still too early to compare this year's
book rush against previous years. Ac-
cording to Musser, the number of used
books bought back by Ulrich's had been
up over previous years, despite the
Union store's early book buy-back.
The policy for discounting books at
Ulrich's has been to match the U-Cellar
price on many course textbooks. Ac-
cording to Maloney, the newly-
discounted textbooks will remain on
sale throughout the book rush.
Previously Maloney had announced
that his store would sell all textbooks at
list price.

student textbook dollar

-IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Nicaraguan assembly sworn in
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - The new 96-member National Assembly was
sworn in yesterday, one day before the presidential inauguration of San-
dinista junta coordinator Daniel Ortega. 4
The assembly will have as its first principal task the writing of a new con
stituion.
Sixty-one of the assembly delegates taking the oath yesterday for six-year
terms were members of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, with the
remainder representing various minor oppostion parties. The assembly,
members also were elected Nov. 4. Prominent among the delegates being
sworn in was Carlos Nunez Tellez, one of nine members of the Sandinista
National Directorate, which holds ultimate power in the country. He was
elected president of the assembly.
The main opposition group, the Nicaraguan Democratic Coordinate,
boycotted the elections, contending conditions were inadequate for a fait'
campaign. The United States called the elections a farce.
Ortega, the leftist leader elected Nov. 4, will take office this afternoon a
the first president since the Sandinistas came to power in 1979 following a
revolution that toppled the 42-year dynasty of the rightist Somoza family.
Unemployment rate rises slightly
WASHINGTON - The nation's unemployment rate rose a tenth of a per.
centage point to 7.2 percent in December, the Labor Department reported
yesterday, but some analysts saw the creation of 340,000 new jobs during the
month as a favorable sign for the economy.
The total number of unemployed people rose to 8.2 million as the civilian
labor force expanded by 390,000, the Labor Department report said.
Michael Evans, president of Evans Economics Inc., cautioned that while
employment gains were "a lot stronger than people were looking for. .
we're just seeing a lagged effect left over from earlier in the year." He sai
the lagged effect meant firms were finally bringing back more employees,
after laying off so many people in the 1982 recession.
He predicted the unemployment rate would move higher through mid-
1985, possibly as high as 7.7 percent. A rising jobless rate, he said, will be
coupled with weak economic growth of 1 percent to 2 percent in this'
year's first quarter.
French fire destroys hospital wing
GRANDVILLIERS, France - A pre-dawn fire yesterday raced through
one wing of a home for the elderly, killing 24 residents and forcing 156 patien-
ts out into the subzero darkness, police said.
A hundred firefighters, hampered by freezing hoses in record-shattering
cold, fought the blaze until morning in a wing housing the elderly in the state
run rural hospital in Grandvilliers, 60 miles northwest of Paris.
Police said the fire was started after a frozen pipe burst, spilling water on-
to electrical wires, which shorted. Temperatures hovered around minus 4
degrees Fahrenheit.
"What a night of horror," said the Rev. Pierre Mabillotte, the parish'
priest, his face red with cold and lined with fatigue.
"It was like a bad dream," said Elia Haudiquer, 88, who was awakened by
screaming in the halls.
"I tried to get dressed, I was trembling," she recalled. "The roof was
burning all over. . . . We walked out in the snow but everything happened
very quickly."
Herpes victim approved for school
ANNAPOLIS, Md. - A 3-year-old boy with herpes can attend school if he
wears a protective jumpsuit and does not have open lesions on his hands, a
judge ruled.
Ann Mundel County Circuit Judge Eugene Lerner issued the jumpsuit
ruling for the Maryland child after meeting with representatives of the coun
ty's teachers union and county schools. Lerner ruled the boy, who has an un
disclosed type of herpes, must be checked by a nurse before school each day
and cannot attend classes if he has open sores on his hands.
"This is a good day for all children," said the boy's father, who joined the
teachers' union in applauding the rulling, which remains in effect until Jan
19. A hearing has been set for Jan 18.
Govt. announcesMedicare.change
WASHINGTON - The government approved regulations yesterday
allowing Medicare to pay health maintenance organizations in advance, a
change expected to draw at least 200,000 elderly people into the prepaid
medical care programs over the next year.
The Department of Health and Human Services announced the'
regulations, saying the new provisions should expand medical care:
available to Medicare recipients while reducing the cost of their care to the
federal government.
"Under these rules, HMO's (health maintenance organizations) can offer
Medicare beneficiaries substantial benefits not covered by Medicare, in
some cases with the added incentive of reduced out-of-pocket costs," said:
HHS Secretary Margaret Heckler in a statement.
"The beneficiary can compare regular Medicare coverage with the
package an HMO may offer, and then decide which is the better bargain,"
Heckler said.
Under contracts with HMOs, patients pay a fixed premium in advance for
medical care and agree to be treated only by designated doctors and at
designated clinics or hospitals. The HMO agrees to provide whatever care is
needed without further charge.

0

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Daily Photo by STU WEIDENBACH
Eager students approach the book counter at Ulrich's yesterday.

Weadierization makes ballot

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
and
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Invite You:
For Worship Sundays 9:55 a.m.
For Fellowship Sunday Morning Class 11:15 a.m.
Wednesday Eve. Supper (free)
and Fellowship 5:30 p.m.
THE CAMPUS CENTER IS OPEN FOR YOUR USE
Pastors: Bob Wallace and Madelyn Johnson
LOCATED AT 502 E. HURON(Between State and Division)
FOR TRANSPORTATION CALL 663-9376

w

(Continued from Page i)
"unobtrusive" and shouldn't be a big
financial burden on the landlord. He
added that only 25 percent of rental
housing in the area would be affected
by the proposal, which would exclude

cooperatives,
sororities.

fraternities,

and

r

Suboehide La
T4e
764-0558

III

I

Van Boven

Clothing &
Shoes

Winter Sale

Take this opportunity to save on the finest
clothing, shoes and accessories.
20% to 50% Reductions
* SUITS
" SPORTCOATS
" DRESS SHIRTS
* SPORT SHIRTS
* SLACKS
* TIES
" SWEATERS
" GLOVES
* HATS
* MEN'S and WOMEN'S SHOES
" MEN'S AND WOMEN'S BOOTS
All Merchandise from
our regular stock
Sale now in progress
Through January 26th
Hours: 9:00-5:30 Monday-Saturday
Open Friday evenings until 8:00

Ann Arbor residents currently pay a
higher heating bill than the average
calculated b;y Consumers Power Com-
pany for southeastern and lower
Michigan. City residents pay an
average of $1,350 during the heating
season while the area average is
around $920, Kaller said.
Warm members say aright now they
are "taking a low profile" and will not
escalate their efforts unless it becomes
necessary. "Our budget doesn't allow
us to get too grandiose," he said. In the
last election involving a weatherization
proposal, landlord organizations for-
med a coalition and spent thousands of
dollars to defeat the measure, Kaller
said.
SHARP
Solar-Powered
Scientific Calculator.
/
EL-51OS
SOperates on highly sensitive
silicon solar cells which receive
their power from natural and
artificial light.
E31 preprogrammed scientific
and statistical functions-
trigonometric, inverse trigono-
metric, logarithmic and others.
Direct formula entry.
*5-digit mantissa and 2-digit
exponent capacities.
Degree/radian/grad mode.
Comes with its own attractive
wallet case.
Special Book Rush Hours:
Thurs. Jan.10th-8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Fri. Jan. 11th-8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sat. Jan. 12th-9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Sun. Jan. 13th-12:00 Noon to 5:00 p.m.
Mon. Jan. 14th-8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Tues. Jan 15th-8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Jan 16th-8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Thurs. Jan. 17th.8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

0

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Vol. XCV -'No. 82
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: September through April - $16.50 in Ann Arbor; $29.00
outside the city; May through August - $4.50 in Ann Arbor, $6.00 outside the
city. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send,
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate and College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

n

Editor in Chief ................. BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors.............CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors........LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor ....................SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors................JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Nancy Dolinko, Lily Eng, Rachel Gottlieb,
Thomas Hrach, Gregory Hutton, Bruce Jackson, Sean
Jackson, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry Markon,
Eric Mattson, Molly Melby, Tracey Miller, Kery Mur-
akami, Arona Pearlstein, Lisa Powers, Charles Sewell,
Stacey Shonk, Dan Swanson, Allison Zousmer.
Magazine Editor................JOSEPH KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editors ..... PAULA DOHRING
JOHN LOGIE
Arts Editors.................FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Associate Arts Editors.............BYRON L. BULL
JEFF FROOMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
ANDY WEINE

Sports Editor .....,_.............MIKE McGRAW"
Associate Sports Editors..........JEFF BERGIDA
KATIEBLACKWELL
PAUL HELGRENr
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE'
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Andy Arvidson, Mark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, Debbie deFrances, Joe
Devyak, Joe Ewing, Chris Gerbasi, Jim Gindin, Skip
Goodman. Jon Hartman, Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan,M
Tom Keaney, Mark Kovinsky, Tim Makinen, Adam
Martin, Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade, Scott Miller., ,
Brad Morgan, Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Adam Ochlis,
Mike Redstone, Scott Salowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan
Warner.
Business Manager..............STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager................ LIZ CARSONr
Display Manager..............KELLIE WORLEY
Nationals Manager ................... JOE ORTIZ4
Sales Manager .............DEBBIE DIOGUARDI
Finance Manager................ LINDA KAFTAN
Marketing Manager................KELLY SODEN
Classified Manager ............ JANICE BOLOGNA
Ass't. Display Manager .......... JEFFREY DOBEK
Ass't. Sales Manager.............LAURIE TRUSKE
Ass't. Finance Manager ...........JANE CAPLAN
Ass't. Classified Manager..........TERRENCE YEE
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Ellen Abrahams, Sheryl
Beisman, Mark Bookman, Steve Casiani, Peter Gian-
greco, Seth Grossman, Mary Ann Hogan, Mark Stobbs,
Dawn Willacker.

..

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