100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Merchants fight sidewalk changes

By BILL HAHN
City business owners last night voiced their op-
position at a City Council public hearing to a proposal
to expand sidewalks along Liberty and Fourth Streets
and an alley north of the State Theatre.
Representatives fron the Downtown Development
Authority (DDA) say wider sidewalks will make the
shopping area more attractive. They also plan to
plant trees parallel to parking meters already lining
the streets.
HOWEVER, most merchants speaking at the third
hearing on the subject, didn't agree with the
proposal.

"We are opposed to changing the width of the
streets," said Milt Rockman, owner of Sam's Store on
Liberty. "In all my 17 years in Ann Arbor no one has
said to me that they've never had enough room to
walk."
The widening of the sidewalks will mean that both
streets' width will be reduced by one lane.
MERCHANTS say that narrower streets will cause
congestion in the shopping area.
"My concern is with the narrowing of the streets,
Rockman said. "If you do not have the flexibility of
four lanes, we will be hurting. We're an automobile
city and we should be oriented that way."
Ben Gardener, a stockbroker whose office is off
Liberty, said narrowing the street will cause traffic
problems.

Most of my clients want a quick, easy parking area.
They don't care how pretty Liberty Street looks."
They want to get in and out of my office as quick as
possible."
"The problem is that the trees in that area are too
big," said Glen Crawford, a lawyer who owns a
building on Fourth Street. "The trucks are going to
beat them to a pulp."
"We need some ideas that are a little more in-
novative and creative," Crawford said.
Rockman suggested that the DDA try an ex-
periment in which they block off one lane on Liberty
as would be the case if the renovations took place.
"Try this experiment first and if it works than I'll
support the proposal," Rockman said.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 29, 1985 - Page 3
THE NICARAGUA TRIANGLE:
CENTRAL AMERICA, ISRAEL, U.S.A.
This program will look at U.S. policy
toward Nicaragua in the light of U.S.
policy toward the whole of Central
America. Background will be provided on
the history of intervention in the
region by other foreign powers, such as
Britian, Spain, etc. Included in this
framework will be an examination of
Israel's role as weapons-merchant in
that part of the world. Following the
overview, we will focus on present-day
U.S.-Nicaragua relations.
Speakers and discussion leaders for the
evening will be Judith Lalkin Elkin,
Visiting Associate Professor of History
and an expert on Latin America, and
eeits Kalmowltz, founding member of the
Nicaragua Medical Aid Project in Ann
Arbor, who recently visited Nicaragua.
Professor Sydney Bernard of the School
of Social work will moderate.
Wednesday, January 30 7:30 P.M.
Hillel, 1429 Hill Street
For Information: 663-3336
Sponsored by PZC
YOU'VE JUST SPENT $50,000
ON A COLLEGE EDUCATION...
NOW SPEND 8 MORE FOR A JOB!
M NEYJ B!I.

Gregory
encourages
black,
activism
(Continued from Page 1)
said, "there's something wrong when
you need to be entertained so much.
There's one thing you could participate
in and that's the movement. But we
:can't find you."
GREGORY warned the predominan-
tly black audience that "ninety-three
percent of all black suicides are college
grads. You come to this place and they
'rinse your head out and teach you about
a white world you're never going to get
along in. You've got to change this
thing. The number one problem for you
is going to be your blackness. And there
is no course that's gonna teach you Get-
ting Along with White Folks 101."
An an observation of the lack of
education regarding the civil rights
movement, Gregory said, "Yeah, you
-all know who Herschel Walker is, but
how many black folks really know who
'Rosa Parks is? All she did was sit there
and say 'no,' and that one word made
the whole world blush," Gregory said.

Beam it upA
The Space Shuttle Enterprise slowly makes its way down a Santa Barbara, California highway on its 17-mile trip to the
launch pad. The Enterprise, a non-flying mockup, is being used to test the facility's readiness for future shuttle.

Daily may
(Continued from Page 1)
hope to get the issue resolved
Wednesday's board meeting,"
aily Editor in Chief Bill Spindle.
ncerely want to work with the

"We:
before
said Da
"We si

He urged the audience to participate board, but we feel that it is very dif-
in American protests of the South ficult in the present situation."
African policy of apartheid and spoke of THE BOARD is a 10-member panel in
the legacy Martin Luther King, Jr. and charge of the finances of the Daily, the
activists of the '60s have left for the Ensian yearbook, and the Gargoyle
"g80. humor magazine. The group last met in
"What Dr. King did pushed the door April. Tomorrow's meeting will be the
open a little bit. But the way he did it first for the four new board members
those on the other side could never close appointed since then.
it. Forever and ever the light will come
through ... so just go up to (the door). The Daily editors asked Shapiro to
We've already done the hard part." guarantee that he would appoint the
Daily's first choice for the next open
-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
The Student Organization Development Center is presenting its Winter
1985 Leadership Workshop Series. Current and potential leaders of student
organizations are encouraged to attend. The series will take place at 6:30
p.m. in the Union.
Film.
AAFC- Macbeth, 7 p.m.; Henry V, 9:10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Speakers
Chinese Studies - Kenneth Lieberthal, "China Report: 1985", noon, Lane
Hall Commons.
Democratic Socialists of America - Adena Kelman, "What's Left For
Progressives after Reagan," 7:30 p.m., Wolverine Room, Union.
Ecumenical Campus Center & International Center - Stephen Franklin,
"Palestinians and a Middle East Settlement", noon, International Center,
603 E. Madison Street.
Computing Center - "Intro to the File Editor," 12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS,
"Intro to the MTS File Editor, Part I," 3:30 p.m., 165 Business Ad-
ministration Building.
Performances
School of Music - University Symphony Orchestra, Gustav Meier, con-
ductor, 8 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go C.Lub -7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Assembly - 7:30 p.m., Assembly Chambers, 3909
Union.
AIESEC - International Business Management club, 5:15 p.m., 131
Business Administration Building.
University Student Alanon-noon, Rm. 3200, Union.
Rugby Club -8 p.m., Coliseum.
The American Lung Association of Michigan - 7 p.m., 501 N. Maple
Street.
Michigan Panhellinic - 6:30 p.m., Phi Beta Phi Sorority.
Turner Geriatric Clinic - Intergenerational Women's Group, 10 a.m., 1010
Wall Street.
Miscellaneous
His House Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann
Street.
Ark - Herb David Guitar Studio, 8p.m., 637 S. Main street.
Chemistry - Seminar, K.G. Caulton, "Transitional Metal Polyhydrides:
Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity," 4 p.m., Rm. 1300, Chemistry Building.
Human Resources & Development - C. Lilly, "Communicating Effec-
tively for Official Staff", 1 p.m., room 130 B, LSA.
Microcomputer Education Center - Workshop, Intro to the Macintosh,
10:30 a.m., 3113, School of Education building.
Program in American Institutions - Workshop, 3 p.m., Pond A&B, Union.
U-Club - uptown Reggas, 9 p.m., Union.
Alice Lloyd Library - Study Abroad Workshop, Jim Gehlhar, 7:30 p.m.,

boycott board meeting
position, instead of choosing from a list Daily proposes to do is compound one
of six. irregularity with another one," he said.
If the request is granted, Spindle Under the Daily proposal, the
said, the Daily would attend regular appointment procedure would
tomorrow's meeting. be followed after the appointment of
SUSAN LIPSCHUTZ, assistant to the Urban Lehner, a former Daily editor
president, said the bylaw is unclear and bureau chief of The Wall Street
about how a position should be filled Journal in Detroit.
when a member resigns. Eisendrath said the Daily should con-
"The bylaw is silent on what happens sider suggesting other new appointees.
when there's a vacancy," she said. EISENDRATH added that the
"It's ambiguous." meeting will take place to vote on the
She added, however, that a similar Daily's major financial issues even if
appointment procedure "would not the Daily editors don't show up.
happen again." The board is scheduled to approve a
COMMUNICATION Prof. Charles budget for the fiscal year beggining on
Eisendrath, the board's chairman, said July 1, 1985 and consider publishing
the Daily's reaction is understandable. plans for the summer edition of the
"Everybody admits (the way Currier Daily.

MONEY JOBS! is the first and the mone
only guide to corporate training is sure t
programs for prestigious, well- - ROBEF
paying jobs in today's hottest Robert Hz
job market-finance. Includes "A very s
listing of all financial training A M
programs in the U.S. with de-
tailed descriptions of length,
structure and content; competi-
tion, qualifications, benefits, "An extre
perks and salaries. "The infor- I've neve
mation...is concise, com- practical
plete and easy to read. And -MAUR
the compilation about spe- Depu
cific banks, investment com- Burnham
panies, CPA firms, financial "A boon t
institutions and insurance ble."
companies gives the readers '
an excellent insight about "Forcaree
many companies. For those those se'
who are looking to go where
Paper, $7.95, now at your bookstore,
or use coupon to order. r
CRON PUBLISHERS Inc
CROWN PUBLISHERS, INC., Dept. 636
34 Engelhard Ave., Avenel, N.J. 07001
Please send me MONEY JOBS!. I enclose my check or
money order for $7.95 plus 95ยข postage and handling
charge. If lIwish. I may return the book within ten days for
full refund.
Name
Address
City State Zip
N. and N.J residents, add sales tax

y is-MONEY JOBSI
o lead them there."
RT HALF, author of
alf on Hiring
avvy uide."
ARY CUNNINGHAM
President, Semper
Enterprises, Inc.
emely useful book.
er seen anything as
1.1
ITS E. EDERSHEIM
uty Chairman, Drexel
Lambert Incorporated
o the upwardly mo-
- Booklist
r-changers as well as
eking their first job."
- Glamour

1
636
---I

was appointed) was a mistake," he
said. "I think the Daily's position is
completely reasonable."
But Eisendrath questioned whether
boycotting the meeting would do any
good, saying that such a move would be
"not particularly wise."
HE SAID the Daily's solution to the
problem is unreasonable. "What the
WELCOME
Ladies & Children
We specialize in the
latest styles for 1985
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Maple Village ......... 761-2733
Liberty off State ....... 668-9329
Neutrogena'Bars
there's
no one formula for
beautiful skin
Unique
Neutrogena
cleansing for
every skin type
Available in:
Original Formula
Original Formula
(Unscen ted)

U I

.: - _ -,S " i, ' " . : .t
4-J
NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF CHIROPRACTIC
As the need for specialized health care continues to grow, Northwestern
College of Chiropractic can help you enter a satisfying career taking care of
people as a Doctor of Chiropractic.
Committed to high standards in education and research for over 40 years,
Northwestern offers you comprehensive chiropractic training on a modern
campus distinguished for its excellent facilities and dedicated teaching
staff.
Located in the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Northwestern
College of Chiropractic puts you within the heart of a metropolitan area
known for its cultural and recreational opportunities. With the largest number
of parks and lakes of any U.S. city, the Twin Cities metropolitan area offers
everything from swimming and boating to biking, skiing and camping. A
wealth of museums, theaters, musical events, professional sports activities,
exceptional restaurants and shopping centers are all within minutes of the
campus.
If you would like to know how Northwestern College of Chiropractic can
help you achieve your career goals, complete the form below or call the
admissions office TOLL FREE at 1-800-328-8322, Extension 290 or collect at
(612) 888-4777.
I-------------------------------------------------!
| Please send me more information on
Northwestern College of Chiropractic
Name

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan