100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 27, 1985 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 5 - Sunday, January 27, 1985

Auschwitz victim tells of
horror 40 years later

OBWIECIM, Poland-A World War II
concentration camp survivor said
yesterday that she remembered mainly
the dogs, the bright lights and the
"Nights of terror" she suffered as a vic-
tim of the genetic experiments of the in-
famous Nazi doctor Josef Mengele.
Ludmila Maksymowicz, who was
only 3 years old when interned at the
Auschwitz concentration camp, told
reporters at the site, "I was terrified of
the name Mengele, it will be imprinted
on my mind forever."
MAKEYMOWICZ WAS among more.
than 100 Polish, Israeli and American
survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau
concentration camp who revisited the
site this weekend to mark the 40th an-
niversary of their liberation by the
Soviet Red Army on Jan. 27, 1945.
Flowers were laid at the site yester-
day where the Nazis exterminated
more than 4 million people, including
2.5 million Jews.
"I remember arriving at Auschwitz
with my mother and grandparents in
1943. I was separated from my mother
and my grandparents were im-
mediately sent to the gas chambers,"
Maksymowicz said.
Wholehrooms are crammed with
human hair shorn from the victims
before they were sent to the gas cham-
bers. Other rooms contain millions of

pairs of shoes, spectacles and artificial
limbs stripped from the camp inmates
before their extermination.
"I can only remember nights of
terror, the shouts of SS-men, dogs,
lights and the cries of mothers and
children separated from each other,"
she said as she displayed the blue tat-
tooed concentation camp number on
her arm.
MAKSYMOWICZ SAID she was
chosen as a subject for the insidious
"experiments" of death camp doctor
Josef Mengele, known as the "Angel of
Death." Mengele is rumored to be alive
although his whereabouts are not
known.
"I was forced to give blood so often
that I was always weak," she said.
"Mengele's staff also injected various
substances into me so that today I have
to take regular injections to stay alive."
She said she managed to survive only
with the help of other prisoners who
looked after her.
"WHEN THE Soviet army arrived I
did not even knowwhat my name was
-they gave me margarine and
bread-it was the most beautiful taste I
can remember," she said.
Yesterday's visit was her first to the
camp since it was liberated. With tears
rolling down her face, she said her ex-
periences as a prisoner had forced her
to seek psychiatric help afterwards.
"I promised I would never come
back-but I now realize that one has
to," she said.
Aushwitz has been preserved as a

Members of Balletap U.S.A. dance troupe jive in sync to one of their delightful routines, "Pretty and the Wolf."
Balletap dancers high-step in A2

Friegel
... survived medical experiments
horrible reminder and warning to
mankind of the atrocities committed by
the Nazis in their attempt to create an
all-white "master race."
Over the entrance of the camp still
stands the slogan camp still stands the
slogan "Arbeit Macht Frei"-Work
Makes You Free. But over the entrance
of the town of Osmiecim where the
camp stands there was another banner
Saturday, saying: "No more Ausch-
witz, no more war."

t-

By Tracy Uselmann
Look out! Ann Arbor is about to
experience a performance con-
sisting of every type of dance
imaginable fused into one company
called Balletap USA.
The company consists of sixteen
members and features respectively,
performers and choreographers
Maurice Hines, the star of the movie
"The Cotton Club" and Mercedes
Ellington, the Duke's own gran-
ddaughter. Also included is guest
artist Carmen de Lavallade.
BETWEEN HINES' optimistic
view and Ellington's diverse ex-
perience (along with other gifted ar-
tists), they experiment and take

chances with many new ideas, in-
cluding spoofs on MTV.
Although specializing in ballet and
tap, the company has a diverse style
covering many areas in dance and
using music which ranges from rock
to classical to jazz.
The feature number, titled "Pret-
ty and the Wolf," is choreographed
by Hines and Ellington and perfor-
med to music by the Duke himself.
The storyline is based on Little Red
Riding Hood, but takes place in
Harlem. If Hines performs as well
in this number as he did in his recent
star role in the Broadway musical
"Sophisticated Ladies," he will
surely have the crowd on their feet.

THE COMPANY is still young
with it's world premier in April of
1984. The dancers add diversity to
the company, as they have been
gathered from backrounds ranging
from Broadway to television.
This dance-stravaganza will begin
tomorrow afternoon at 3:00 p.m. at
the Power Center for Performing
Arts. Tickets, while in short supply,
are available at the University
Music Society offices, located in the
Burton Tower, and range in price
from $11 to $15.
The diversity of this group should
draw all types of audiences. It may
be worth putting the books down for
a Sunday afternoon of entertain-
ment!

wI

Reagan to
(Continued from Page 1)
Students barred from the Guaranteed
Student Loan Program-under which
, the loans are free while the borrower
remains a student, and the interest is
only 9 percent afterwards-could turn
to an auxiliary loan program for paren-
ts that extends loans under much less
- favorable terms.
Under that program, borrowers are
charged interest while they are still in
school at rates 3.5 points above the in-
terest rate on Treasury Bills-a total of

attempt loan reduction

about 12 percent currently-and
repayments must start immediately.
Reagan will include the student aid
cutbacks in the budget he is scheduled
to send to Congress on February 4. Most
of the cuts would affect loans and gran-
ts for the academic year starting in
September 1986, although Reagan, in
his attempts to cut domestic spending,
may also seek rescission that could af-
fect the aid budget for this fall.
Higher education lobbyists have been

girding for an attack on student aid, the
largest chunk of the education depar-
tment's $17.9 billion fiscal 1985 budget.
More than 5 million college students
get some federal help each year, in-
cluding 3.3 million who borrowed more
than $7 billion in guaranteed loans last
year. Banks and other private lending
agencies made the loans, but the
government insurestheirrepayments
and pays all the interest while the
borrow: rs pursue their education.

New Israeli
wage, price
controls may
cut inflation
JERUSALEM (AP) - The gover-
nment's new wage and price controls
are expected to cut Israel's 445 percent
inflation sharply, a senior government
official said Friday.
And the official said if a dramatic
decline is achieved it may help push
through a request for a major increase
in the annual aid package from the
United States.
PRIME Minister Shimon Peres on
Thursday announced agreement on
cuts in price subsidies for consumer
goods and limits on wage increases, an
austerity plan designed to control in-
flation.
The official, who agreed to an inter-
view on condition he not be identified,
forecast that inflation would drop from
445 percent in 1984 to 120 or 135 percent
this year "if everything goes according
to plan."
Within two years, he said, Israel
could bring down inflation to the level of
most industrialized nations and
stabilize the shekel, the Israeli curren-
cy which now loses value almost daily.
Full recovery depends on the gover-
nment's ability to cut spending in the
face of a heavy repayment schedule on
$19 billion in foreign debts.

Mon. & Fri. Twilight
M " " " " " "Shows $2.50 til 6 P.M. *
$1 Moo SAT. & SUN. FIRST MATINEE ONLY $2.00
U* With this entire ad $1.00 off adult Evening admission.
: Coupon good for purchase of one or two tickets good all "
OFF features thru 1/31/85 (EXCEPT TUESDAYS).
SFROM MARK RYDELL. THURS.!
S Ehe% THE DIRECTOR OF HE'S NOT JUST ANOTHER OUT-OF-TOWNER!
. 1 "ON GOLDEN POND" " .
9
SUN. 1:00, 3:00, 8:30
" ... MON. 8:30 P.M."
: THE TALKING HEADS
S4'CHANNEL DOLBY STEREO
* SISSY SPACEK MEraG BSON i M A K I NG
PG 13
SUN. 12:50, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 0 SUN. 3:10, 5:00, 6:50, 10:30
MON. 5:00, 7:30, 9:45 MON. 5:00, 6:50, 10:30
* Ugmnsoeeeee seeoeeeomnmnmn

T.V.

crew works without glamour

COMING FEBRUARY 1st!
6 GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATIONS.
THE KILLING FIELDS
Starring SAM WATERSTON
"AN EXTRAORDINARY MOVIE!"
David Anson, NEWSWEEK
A FILM THAT IS DESTINED
TO BE TALKED ABOUT AND REMEMBERED FOR YEARS!

(Continued from Page 1)
innate talent, but passion," for what
they do, said Len DeLuca, director of
program planning for CBS Sports.
THE CREW of approximately 20
arrived in Ann Arbor early Friday af-
ternoon, and immediately began
r preparing the arena for today's broad-
cast.
It doesn't take the experienced crew
long to set up the technical equipment.
"Half-a-day at the most, this is not a big
show - only three cameras, two minis,
and two microphones," said Bernie
Sweeney, a CBS crewman in charge of
audio.
CBS travels with two trucks that con-
tain all the audio and video equipment.
Inside these trucks, audio and video
engineers busily adjust the hundreds of
knobs, switches, and dials to ensure a
technically sound broadcast. It is here
that instant replays and head shots, and
all the audio mixing is done, said Gary
" Moore, who works on the CBS video
tape crew.
"These technicians work all of the
w network's big shows," Moore said.
"They are the best in the business."
But being the "best" television
technician doesn't always mean a
university education. In fact, the
educational background of CBS crew
members varies: some received a
college degree, some went to technical
school, and others gained "hands-on"
experience, according to Moore.
THE COMMON ingredient of a talen-
ted crew is experience. And most of the
CBS technicians have an average of 7 to
10 years of experience, some with as
many as 25 to 30 years, Moore said.
They are what Associate Producer Bob

Rowe calls "tested talent."
Though most viewers probably don't
realize it, each picture they see on the
set is carefully planned. CBS Associate
Producer Bob Rowe shares his
technique.
"I want to put Ann Arbor on the
map," he said, explaining the opening
video tape for the show. To achieve this
effect he plans to shoot an aerial view of
Crisler Arena and switch to a
"Welcome to Ann Arbor" sign.
VIEWERS WILL also look at the
University. Rowe said he wants to show
students and the University interac-
ting, to show what it's like to go to
school in Ann Arbor. Other important
video tape segments will include head
shots of the Michigan and Kansas
players.
Of the 580 hours of sports programs
aired this year by CBS, much is divided
up between college and professional
sports. For one cameraman, filming
college sports has a special appeal.
"The mainsdifference between
college and pro basketball is you get to

go to more places and you get more en-
thusiastic crowds - more color," he
said. "When you need a reaction from
the crowd, it's there. It's not always
there in pro (basketball)."
Sometimes the crew members
can't resist the urge to become players
instead of onlookers. After breaking for
lunch yesterday, several crew mem-
bers decided to grab a few basketballs
and started an impromptu game.
But there is not always time for hor-
sing around in the television business.
It is not a 9 to 5 type of job, according to one
Chicago crew member who said he
usually travels across the country for
months at a time.
"A lot of times in between jobs, we
don't get home at eleven," he said. "All
you need is an apartment somewhere to
hang your clothes up."
For those who think television is the
dream job, think again. Game
Producer Bob Dekas does away with
the myth, admitting that the work is
"not so glamorous on a day to day
basis."

PON

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE.

Need some?

FIND IT AT MSA.

Applications now Being Accepted for
Chief Financial Officer

ALL YOU NEED IS:
" Enthusiasm
" Familiarity with Accounting Principles
msa
michigan student assembly
the university of michigan
3909 michigan union
ann arbor, michigan 48109
(313) 763-3241

YOU'LL GET:
" Excellent practical experience in small business management
" Rewarding experience with other student leaders
* Your own office!
Applications due Monday, Feb. 4
For more info call
Bill Mellin or Cherie Bullard at 763-3241
OR STOP IN AT MSA.

Officeof Major Events presents:
Two Legends! One Incredible Night!!
at
HILL AUDITORIUM

r

I=I o

7-
763-1107

Registration
JANUARY 21
thru FEBRUARY 6
Michigan Union
Ticket Office

Help,
give
h~hi/'

I

Tp
H
E

FOUR TOP

Q

Pool Speed Reading
WEDNESDAYS 7-8:30 p.m WEDNESDAYS 7-9pm
2/133/2$50/person
$12/person
Beer Bridge
Appreciation WEDNESDAYS 7-9pm
IThursdays 7-9pm 3/6-3/20
* o rsdas 21p7-//3/1
$20/person $15/person

Basic Mime
Conversation MONDAYS 7-8:30 p.m.
Skills f or
European Travel 2111-3/18
TUESDAYS 7-9pm Jf $16/person
D2/12-3/26
$18/person
Ballroom Dancing Financial
Planning
MONDAYS 7-9pm TUESDAYS 7-9pm
2/11-3125 2/12-3/12
$28/couple ~*1~$18/person

E

i i

* - -

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan