100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1985 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Women's Gymnastics
vs. Ohio State and LSU
Saturday, 7 p.m.
Crisler ArenaI

SPORTS

Innertube Water Polo
Sign up deadline
Tuesday, 4:30 p.m.
IM Sports Building

The Michigan Daily

Sunday, January 20, 1985

Page 7

Blue icers dumped again by

RPI,

5-1

By ADAM MARTIN
Special to the Daily
TROY, N.Y. - They may be rankedl
number five in the country, but ac-
cording to Michigan head coach Red'
Berenson, RPI's Engineers in no way
outplayed the Wolverines, despite com-'
pleting a weekend sweep last night with
a 5-1 victory.
"We certainly played with them,"
Berenson sighed after the game. "I
wsas happy with our effort, but we just
weren't putting the puck in the net."
PENALTIES were greatly respon-
sible for the lacking Wolverine offense,
which suffered through at least 20
minutes shorthanded.
Berenson was quick to mention slop-
py officiating in analyzing his club's
woes. "I've seen it all year, and I don't
like it at all," said an angry Berenson.
"There's been no control at all by the
officials."
And last night was no exception. The
first period was marred by numerous
penalties on both sides, including game
misconducts to Michigan's Bill Brauer
and Renssselaer's Kraign Nienhuis af-
ter the two were whistled for fighting.
RPI COACH Mike Addesa was
equally disappointed with the

refereeing. "I don't know why it's
allowed to be this way," said Addesa.
"It looked like a roller derby."
Referee Pierre Belanger called the
Wolverines for seven infractions in the
period and the Engineers for four,
prompting the RPI faithful to gallantly
cheer, "the ref beats his wife," despite
the home team's advantage.

The Engineers jumped to an early
lead at 1:08, before both teams engaged
in the not-so-clean, illegal extravagan-
za. Junior George SErvinis flew down
the left side on RPI's first two-on-one of
the evening, took a pass right over the
blue line from defenseman Tim Friday,
and flicked a little wrist shot in the top
right corner.
WOLVERINE freshman goaltender
Tim Makris was obviously surprised by
the puck, but went on to make some
brilliant saves when Michigan was
shorthanded.
Still, the Wolverines were unable to
skate off behind by only one. With 40
seconds left in the frame and a 5-3 RPI
advantage (Ray Dries was out for trip-
ping, Jeff Norton for slashing), junior
Mike Dark drilled the puck past Makris
from 40 feet out at the right point.
The penalty barrage continued
through three minutes of the second
period when RPI again gained a man
advantage after Michigan's Todd
Carlile went out for holding.
"OUR defensemen were not used to
being run and stabbed," complained
Addesa.
Assaulted or not, Makris appeared
sharper and more confident than he's
looked in previous games, as he fr-

ustrated the Engineers on several great
scoring opportunities. But Makris' ice
mates failed to capitalize on their own
chances while playing much of the
period in RPI's zone.
Midwsay thurough the stanza, the tandem
dem that burned Michigan Friday night
for six points gave the Engineers a 3-0
lead on a tow-on-one break.
ADAM OATES, RPI's point getter,

rode in on the right wing, slipping a let-
ter perfect cross-pass to All-American
John Carter, the club's leading goal
scorer. Carter easily punched in his
26th goal of the season behind Makris,
who had little chance against one of
college hockey's premier com-
binations.
Desperately needing a goal, the
Wolverines applied solid pressure in the
third period and came up all but empty.

Norton ruined Engineer netminder
Brian Jopling's shutout attempt at
14:14, but Michigan didn't have enough
fuel left to taint the Engineers any fur-
ther. And RPI had advanced to a four
goal lead at 6:12 on Servinis' 11th of the
year.
The Willowdale, Ontario native added
another with two minutes left to suf-
ficiently finish the Wolverines.

I # 1

FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1. RPI-Servinis (Tiano, Friday) 1:08; 2.
RPI-Dark (Carter, Oates) 19:21.
Penalties: RPI-Carter (tripping) 6:01; RPI-Carter
(double minor, highstick) 10:27; M-Neff (double
minor, highstick) 10:27; M-Brauer (fighting, match
misconduct) 12:17; M-Downing (interference) 12:17;
M-Rossi (roughing) 12:17; RPI-Nienhuis (fighting,
match misconduct) 12:17; RPI-Tosto (roughing)
12:17; M-P. Goff (hooking) 13:19; M-Norton (double
minor, slashing) 15:06; RPI-Jooris (roughing) 15:06;
M-Dries (tripping) 19:06.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3. RPI--Carter (Oates, Friday) 10:38.
Penalties: M--Carlile (holding) 2:56; M-Seychel
(highsticking) 2:56;RPI-Tiano(highsticking) 2:56;

M-Lorden (roughing) 13:02; RPI-Carter
(roughing) 13:02.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4. RPI-Serinis (Carter, Oates) 6:12; 1. M-
Norton (Seychel, Rossi) 14:14; 5. RPI-Serinis (Tosto,
Hernberg) 17:45.
Penalties: M-Norton (holding) :46; M-Bjorkman
(highsticking) 4:40; M-Jones (tripping) 5:58; RPI-
Sadeghpour (hooking) 12:06; M-Carlile (hooking)
17:06; RPI-Whiteside (crosschecking) 19:07.
Saves: M-Makris42; RPI-Jopling29
SCORING BY PERIODS

1 2
MICHIGAN ...........................0 0
RPI ............................21

3-T
1 - 1
2 - 5

Norton
... notches lone 'M' goal

Brauer
... booted

Blue Lines

rVolNk

Tankers sink Oakland;
Hoosiers lay ahead

Minicourse with 1980 Nobel Laureate
CZESLAW MILOSZ
Univ. course 411 1 credit hour Div. 495
POLISH POETRY IN ITS EUROPEAN CONTEXT
lectures and readings IN ENGLISH
MTTh 34:30 p.m. January 28- February 12
Audtiorium B Angell Hall
Available at Crisp. DON'T BE LEFT OUT!
Info. Call Slavic Dept. 764-5355

No Trojans in in Troy...
e..just a lot of hockey
TROY, N.Y.
By TOM KEANEY and ADAM MARTIN
W HEN you're stuck up here in the boonies of New York you get to
thinking...
*Oh the lovely city of Troy, home of uncountable diners and overall ugliness.
Where else would the front page headline read "Female wrestling referee
fulfills her brother's dream"?
eSpeaking of newspapers, the journalists around here are going nuts over
head coach Red Berenson. In the coverage of Friday's game in Albany's
Knickerbocker News, Berenson was mentioned or quoted in 13 of the stories
20 paragraphs.
"RPI coach Mike Addesa was both surprised and impressed by a Wolverine
offensive approach that departs from the usual eastern offense. "They at-
tack with three across, whereas most teams use two and a trailer. It made it
somewhat difficult for us," said the 1966 Holy Cross graduate.
eAddesa's picture in the media guide looks
like Clarence "Lumpy" Ruthreford's 1956
high school yearbook photo. In person,
however, the 41-year-old Addesa looks like a
commercial for Hair Club for Men.
*Addesa oversees a program at RPI called
Provost Scholars, under which exceptional
students receive a cash award and ad-
' > ditional computer time. Those lucky kids.
elf you think the San Diego chicken is an
f' inane attempt at generating fan support,
beware of RPI's representative of the Red
Swarm. Picture a college version of Satur-
day Night Live's human hornets, only in
white with red stripes and identical anten-
nae, and you've got...well you've got the
Addesa idea.
*Much has been made of the antagonism
between the Western Collegiate Hockey Association and the CCHA, but the
East has its own version. When asked about the recent splitting of the East
Coast Athletic Conference into the ECAC and the newly formed Hockey
East, one RPI writer quipped, "It's like the CCHA and the WCHA, the two
hate each other."
*Engineering schools may have a reputation for illiterates, but the
gearheads who attend RPI hockey games can't be faulted for a lack of
clarity or bluntness. When the Engineers are whistled for questionable
penalties, the eloquent chant rising from Houston Ice Arena is, "Hey, Ref,
you suck."
eHockey teams are always a great source of unique names. The Engineers
are no exception with such labels as Trini Iturralde, David Sette-Ducati,
Kraig Nienhuis, and Mike Sadeghpour. Incidentally, only one of those four is
Canadian.
*Houston Arena is a fantastic facility. The recent 2.5 million-dollar
renovations-a sunken-in ice level, hydraulic Zamboni lift, and fantastic
seating arrangements-all demonstrate the engineering genius the school is
famous for.
eRed Berenson and assistant coach Mark Miller have been spending a good
deal of time recruiting in the East-with good reason. Eastern Massachuset-
ts has become a gold mine for college talent. The Wolverines have already
captured the solid Jeff Norton from Acton and up-and-coming, 1983-84 Mass.
goalie-of-the-year Tim Makris from Marlboro. Those players give
Michigan a full dose of Bay State hockey prowess after just two trips east.
In two losses at the University of New Hampshire, the Wolverines were
greeted aggressively by Lexington, Mass. native Steve Leach (a Washington
Capital's draft pick), not to mention getting burned Friday night by RPI's
Carter, who hails from of Woburn, Mass.-one town over from Lexington.
*Word has it that the combined "K" of RPI's faithful exceeds that of all
computers on the east coast. So just what do they do at a Polytechnic in-
stitute? "RPI graduates are responsible for major railroads, bridges, dams
and highways across the country, as well as the railroad systems of Japan
and Latin America," lauds the RPI hockey yearbook. What would we do with
out Troy's four-eyed, tooth-picked physiqued college brethren?

By STEVE HERZ
The Pioneers of Oakland University
were capsized by the Wolverines Satur-
day afternoon at Matt Mann Pool, 77-36,
but nobody involved was the least bit
excited by the outcome.
It wasn't as if Michigan had perfor-
med poorly. The Maize and Blue con-
vincingly captured every event in
which they entered competitors-that's
all but one. The reason for the apathetic
demeanor is the excitement brewing
over next Friday night's home meet
with the defending conference cham-
pion Indiana Hoosiers.
THE HOOSIERS HAVE captured the
Big Ten title eighteen of the past twenty
years, and Michigan coach Jon Urban-
chek's team is poised to end that
domination.
Freshman Jon-Erick Olson, a mem-
ber of the Norweigan Olympic team,
downplayed his victory in the 200-yard
Individual Medley, saying, "They
(Oakland)aren't the best team around,
but it was a good exhibition.
"We're just looking to get ready for
Friday night."
URBANCHEK WOULDN'T even call
the meet an exhibition. He referred to it
as "a rehearsal" and only wished to
talk about his team's big Friday
evening encounter. He said, "There's

nothing else going on in town and for
one dollar it's the cheapest excitement
in town."
Even Oakland seemed to get caught
up in the newfound Indiana craze. In
the traditional meet closing cheer
where each team congratulates the
other the Pioneers added "Beat In-
diana."
Junior Dave Parrish explained the
reason for the team's sentiment, "They
(Indiana) have dominated the con-
ference for so long that there is a
mystique surrounding them."
BUT FRESHMAN DAVE GOCH
discounted any mystique. "They're not
unbeatable," he said. "We'll be really
psyched and we'll be rocking."
Among those doing the rocking will
be Saturday's big winners: Kent
Ferguson, who swept the diving com-
petition; Benoit Clement, a winner in
three separate events; and Jeff Gor-
don, who captured the 1000-meter
Freestyle race.
Perhaps the most encouraging
results form the meet were the perfor-
mances of the freshmen. In addition to
Olson, walk-on Jeff Kuvin was ex-
tremely impressive in the 500-meter
and 1000-meter Freestyles where he
nearly edged Gordon.

s-

Ii

,aY.. M DIS OUMUN FFLERS
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST
F ROM AS * FITS MANY
Installed by LOW AS...SMALL CARS
S 93 ** TPARTICIPATING
Specialists DEALERS
Installed Featuring...
'One of the finest names
YPSILANTIin automotive parts"
2606 Washtenaw Avenue (11/2 Mi. E. of US 23)......................572-9177
TAYLOR
14250 S. Telegraph Rd. (1 Bik. N. of Eureka Rd.)....................946-8470
Individually Owned & Operated
- IN AND OUT IN 30 MINUTES IN MOST CASES
OPEN DAILY AND SAT.8-6 PM
Copyright @ 1985 Meineke

Coaches, players ready
for Super Bowl showdown

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - As the
preparations ended and all but one
player was pronounced fit, Miami
Coach Don Shula and San Francisco
Coach Bill Walsh predicted Friday
their showdown today in Super Bowl
XIX should be just what the fans have
been waiting for - a wide-open, high-
scoring game.
Both Shula, in his record sixth Super
Bowl, and Walsh, in his second, shied
away from predicting who would win.
But both said it will be exciting, an old-
fashioned shootout between the
Dolphin's Dan Marino and the 49ers'
Joe Montana.
" I DON'T spend a lot of time trying
to predict games," Shula said. "Both
offenses are so excellent you've got to
think that a lot of points are going to be
scored."
Walsh agreed, primarily because
Marino, who shattered NFL records
with 5,084 passing yards and 48 touch-
down passes, can produce points so
quickly.
"That one element is so dynamic,
you're just obsessed with trying to stop
it," Walsh said of Marino's long-range
passing to the twin Marks, Duper and
Clayton. We keep looking for a bad
game somewhere in the films and we

can't find it. We're looking for an off
day and it isn't there. You hope maybe
Sunday will be it."
Shula discounted any concern about
Marino's dizzy spell before Thursday's
practice and said his second-year quar-
terback was ready to try and pass the
49ers dizzy today.
Before practice he complained of
some light-headedness and some diz-
ziness," Shula said. "It boiled down to
the fact he had taken an anti-inflam-
matory pill early in the morning and
didn't have any breakfast or lunch."
Photography Classes
Rental Darkroom
F-STOP
663-7867

WORLD PROBLEMS AND
U.S. FOREIGN POLICY
lunch discussions 12 noon
at INTERNATIONAL CENTER
603 E. Madison Street
Tuesday, January 22
"U.S. and Southeast Asia, Phillipines and Indochina"
Speaker: DR. GARY HAWLES
Tuesday, January 29
"Palestinians and a Middle East Settlement"
Speaker: STEPHEN FRANKLIN
U. of M. Journalist in Residence; Reporter, Detroit Free Press
co-sponsored by lunch prepared by
ECUMENICAL CHURCH WOMEN UNITED
CAMPUS CENTER IN ANN ARBOR
International Center Lunch $1.00

SCORES
Ohio State 86, Indiana 84
Illinois 55, Northwestern 43
Purdue 72, Wisconsin 68
Minnesota 81, Michigan State 75
Georgetown 65, Pittsburgh 53
St. John's 66, Boston College 59
Memphis State 69, Louisville 66
Oklahoma 87, Kansas 76
SMU 74, Texas Christian 70
vilanova 86, Seton Hall 74
Duke 93, North Carolina 77
Florida 67, Kentucky 55

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY NEEDS YOU!
Positions are now available on the following Regental and University Committees:
University Budget Priorities Committee
Research Policies Committee (1 grad student)
ww.rw ww ' . _ _ mw

1I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan