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September 07, 1984 - Image 20

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-07
Note:
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V V W V V W V

=MIR

Page 4 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 7, 1984
Jerry Hanlon a key to
Bo s main man:5 yros
"15 years of success

W

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, Sei
Predictions for the new sea

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
In 15 years as head coach of the
Michigan football team, Bo Schem-
bechler has amassed an extraordinary
record of 140 wins, 31 losses and three
ties. Quarterback coach Jerry Hanlon
is the only man who has been with
Schembechler for every down of these
15 campaigns, on the field, and in the
trenches, devoting every physical and
mental impulse toward conquering the
opposing gridiron foe.
"He's an absolutely superb coach,"
praised John McVay, the director of
player personnel for the NFL's San
Francisco 49er's and head coach of the
New York Giants in the late '70s. "He's
been Bo's righthand man for all these
years and he's had tremendous suc-

'Jerry is the kind of
person anyone would
love to have in a
program.'
- John McVay,
San Francisco 49ers'
director of
player personnel

DEMANDING ON the field, Hanlon is.
a compassionate man everywhere else.
He respects, and in many cases comes'
to love his young athletes.
"You treat them as you treat your
own kids," said the father of two sons
and a daughter. "When they do
something wrong you try to correct
them, you try to get them to be the best
they can be."
Former Wolverine tight end Norm
Betts was a recipient of a full dose of
Hanlon coaching.
"YOU'RE NOT GOING to get me to
say something bad about him, because
this guy is a greatguy," said Betts, who
graduated in 1982. "He's a tough-
skinned guy on the field, but he really
wants his players to learn and suc-
ceed."
Now at the top of his class in the
Michigan Dental School, Betts ap-
preciates his coach more than ever. "At
the end of every year he would write all
of his players letters saying how much
he enjoyed working with you and how
proud he was to be your coach. It was
things like that that made him so dear
to me and his other players."
Born in Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and
reared in North Bend, Hanlon lettered
in football, basketball, baseball and
track at Taylor High School. After ser-
ving a two-year tour of duty in the ar-
my, he returned to Miami of Ohio and
was a reserve player under famed foot-
ball coach Ara Parseghian. After
graduating in 1956, Hanlon decided on
the excitement of a career in athletics
instead of law.
Returning to North Bend after
finishing school, he taught in the
district's school system for a year
before McVay called with an assistant
coaching job at Canton Central Catholic
High. After four successful years with
McVay, Hanlon was hired as head
coach by arch-rival Ursuline High in
Youngstown. Two city championships
in three years at Ursuline and he took
another head job at prestigious
Cleveland-St. Edward's High.
AFTER JUST one season at St. Ed-
ward's, Hanlon rejoined his friend Mc-
Vay at the University of Dayton, which
had hired McVay for the 1965 season.
'Whenever I got into a new situation
the first guy I turned to was Jerry
Hanlon, both at Catholic Central and at
Dayton," said McVay, who is godfather
to Hanlon's youngest son, Mickey.
Another of McVay's assistants that first
year at Dayton was George Perles of
Pittsburgh Steeler and Michigan State
fame.

198:3 res
Michigan 6,Wash, frt
washingtoo 25, MichIw
Michigans 3 . wisconsio
Michgan 4.1.Indiana 1
Michigan1 42, MSU fU
Micig5an 35. N'wae#
Michigan 19. Iowa)t3
Illinois 16, Michiga
Michigan 42, PurducIf
Mihia 5,Minnes'A
Michigan 24. Ohio Stali
Auburn 9.MichliganI 7

I.1
In Ii

-

10) Minnesota
National Champion: Auburn
Heisman winner: Bo Jackson

KA TIE BL ACK
1) MICHIGAN
2) Ohio State
3) Iowa
4) Iiaois
5) Wisconsin
6) Michigan State
1983 AP poll

WEL L

PAUL HELGREN
1) MICHIGAN
2) Iowa
3) Ohio state
4) Wisconsin
5) Illinois
6) Indiana
7) Michigan State
8) Northwestern
9) Purdue

DOUGLAS B. IEVY
1) MICHIGAN
2) Ohio State
3) Iowa
4) Illinois
5) Wisconsin
4) Michigan State
7) Indiana
8) Northwestern
9) Minnesota
10) Purdue
National Champion: MICHIGAN
Heisman winner: Keith Byars

1. W
2. M
3. fa
4. Oh
5.11
6. M
7. N
8. Pz
9. M
10. In
Nati
Hels

A look at some top twenty picks

The Michigan DalyBi Ten j
Su S 7) Purdue 10) Minnesota
8) Indiana National Champion: Pittsburgh
fn1 24 9) Northwestern Heisman winner: Not Chuck Long

I

Bo Schembechler and Jerry Hanlon have coached together for the last 18
years. Although'seated to Schembechler's left, Hanlon has been called Bo's
righthand man.

1. Miami
2. Nebraska
3. Auburn
4. Georgia
5. Texas
6. Florida
7. Brigham Young
8. Ohio State
9. MICHIGAN
10. Illinois
I1. SMU
12. Alabama
13. UCLA
14. Iowa
15. Air Force
16. West Virginia
17. Penn State
18. Oklahoma St.
19. Pittsburgh
20. Boston College
1983 UPI poll
1. Miami
2. Nebraska
3. Auburn
4. Georgia
5. Texas
6. Florida

7. Brigham Young
8. MICHIGAN
9.Ohio State
10. Illinois
11. Clemson
12. SMU
13. Air Force
14. Iowa
15. Alabama
16. West Virginia
17. UCLA
18. Pittsburgh
19. Boston College
20. East Carolina

cess. Jerry is the kind of person anyone.
would love to have in a program."
HANLON'S superb reputation for
coaching extends back into the 1950's,
but the North Bend, Ohio native truly;
made his mark as Michigan's offensive,
line coach from 1969-1981. During that:
span, 34 of his linemen played in the
NFL, including four first-round draft
choices and 10 first-team All-
Americans.
Stories about Hanlon's coaching
methods during practices are legen-
dary in Wolverine circles. Said Hanlon,
chuckling, "I'm very open. If I see
something I don't like, I'll say it, and
usually the whole team will hear it too.
"On and off the field is a different
story," continued Hanlon. "During
practice I'll get on a kid, but he knows
that it's nothing personal, that I'm just
trying to improve his technique or
something."

12. Florida State
13. SMU
14. North Carolina
15. Pittsburgh
16. Boston College
17. Penn State
18. Oklahoma
19. Auburn
20. Georgia

But after that first season at Dayton,
Bo Schembechler called from Miami of
Ohio to bring Hanlon back to his alma
mater.
AFTER THREE winning years at
Miami, Hanlon followed Schem-
bechler's rising star to Ann Arbor in '69,
reasoning that a step into the
prestigious Big Ten could not be passed
up.
From that inaugural campaign
through 1981, Hanlon produced offen-
sive lines that worked like well-oiled
machines. Much to Schembechler's
delight opposing defenses were mowed
down week after week, opening up
thousand-yard seasons for a myriad of
gifted Wolverine tailbacks.
After a coaching shuffle in 1981
Hanlon took control of quarterbacks.
He welcomed the new challenge. Steve
Smith was already a fixture at quarter-
back in '82, but going into this year,

Smith's departure has created a void
and Hanlon's new signal caller, junior
Jim Harbaugh, will be under the gun.
ALWAYS STRESSING the mental
aspects of the game, Hanlon respects
no one more than the modern quarter-
back. "The toughest thing to do in
modern athletics is to be a successful
quarterback in a good program."
Harbaugh is still untested as far as
coping with t atal pressure of the
position. Phys;. y, Hanlon knows
Harbaugh has th a'ility, but said, "We
have a big lack of experience and there
is no substitute for experience."
Clearly, Hanlon has a crucial year of
coaching staring him in the face, a task
he relishes.
"Coaches have large, very large
egos," mused Hanlon. "And we satisfy
those egos by helping the kids we coach,
See HANLON, page 19

College Football
Magazine
1. Clemson
2. Arizone State
3. Notre Dame
4. Alabama
5. Nebraska
6. Ohio State
7. Iowa
8. Miami
9. Texas
10. MICHIGAN
11. UCLA

Sporting News
1. Texas
2. Clemson
3. Pittsburgh
4. UCLA
5. Alabama
6. Ohio State
7. Washington
8. Nebraska
9. MICHIGAN
10. Miami (Fla)
11. Penn State
12. Arizona State
13. Notre Dame
14. Oklahoma State

15. Louisiana
16.Oklahom
17. North Ca
18. Tennesse
19. Brigham
20. Missouri
1. Auburn
2. Alabama
3. Pittsburg}
4. Clemson
5. MICHIGA
6. Texas
7. Washingt
8. Wisconsin
9. Notre Dan
10. ArizonaS
I1. Missouri
12. Southern
13. Nebraska
14. Miami
15. Florida S
16. Oklahom
17. Florida
18. Illinois
19.Southern
20. Oklahom

ANG ELO'S
RESTAURANT
"We're famous for our
Homemade Bread"

AUTHORIZED ROLEX SALES
AND SERVICE

Najarian

22-3.
OFFENSIVE STARTERS
RETURNING: 7.
1983 OFFENSIVE RANKING: 8th.
DEFENSIVE STARTERS
RETURNING: 9.
1983 DEFENSIVE RANKING: 10th.
PLAYERS TO WATCH: Andre Harris
(CB), Peter Najarian (LB), Tony
Hunter (RB), Dwayne McMullen (WR).

November 10: Minnesota
COACH: Lou Holtz, (first season at
Minnesota.
LAST SEASON'S RECORD: 1-10. 0-9
Big Ten.
LAST YEAR VS MICH: Michigan 58,
Minnesota 10.EC
SERIES LEADER: MICHIGAN, 49-

Holtz

How appropriate that a comedian
should become the new coach of the
laughing stock of the Big Ten.
Golden Gopher fans won't have
much to cheer about this season, but
with former Arkansas leader Lou
Holtz at the helm there will be
chuckles aplenty.
"I went to the University of Min-
nesota," said Holtz, who has com-
piled a 106-53-5 mark in 14 years of
coaching, "and I cannot tell you
why."
WHILE IT may remain a mystery
why Holtz chose the Great White
North, the team he will be coaching
should offer few surprises. Quite
simply, the Gophers will be terrible.
Minnesota returns a defense that

gave up 47 points per game (more
than the Gopher basketball team
gave up, as Holtz pointed out). The
offense could only muster up about
17 points per contest. And there isn't
much reason to think 1984 will show
significant improvement over last
season's 1-10 mark. Even eternal op-
timist Holtz figures it will be a tough
road to mediocrity.
"I had an awful lot of people tell
me the program is in shambles,"
Holtz said. "I was there about a
week and I . told one guy, (Dallas
superscout) Gil Brandt, you know, I
think you underestimated the
severity of our problem."
Holtz's goal for 1984? "To be in the
Big Ten this time next year."

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