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December 07, 1984 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-12-07

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Page 65 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 7, 1984
BY : The Mormon influence in Provo
* " 11 "n 'N dnJ

i

gives student life a different twist

By KATIE BLACKWELL
Life in Provo, Utah is about as
straight as Ann Arbor is diverse. And
comparing Provo's Brigham, Young
University to the University of
Michigan is worse than using Donny,
Marie and The Rolling Stones in the
same sentence.
Provo, a city of 74,108, is located 45
miles south of Salt Lake City-the heart
and soul of Utah. If Utah and Salt Lake
City are known for anything, it's the
strong, and large, Mormon population.
In 1875, The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints-more commonly
referred to as the Mormons or simply
the LDS-founded Brigham Young
University.
WITH A CURRENT enrollment of
26,000, BYU is the largest privately-
owned college in the country. 98 percent
of the students practice the Mormon'.
faith. According to an article in the
school's press guide, "the university at-
tempts to provide a proper balance
between academic. and religious in-
struction."
Part of this "mix" includes three-
and-a-half years of religion classes-14
credits in all. Most of these classes are
centered on the Mormon religion,
although there are some Bible study
courses available, according to Anne
Thornton, Editor-in-Chief of the Daily
Universal-the school paper.
Another key element in the Univer-
sity's struggle to maintain a high
morality in its students is the "Code of
Honor". This code has been getting a lot
of media attention of late. It requires

Tackles

MICHIGAN

No. Asst.

Total

Loss

Mike Mallory, LB...........
Tim Anderson, LB ..........
Brad Cochran, CB ............
Kevin Brooks, DT...........
Garland Rivers, CB.........
Rodney Lyles, OLB ...........
Mike Hammerstein, DT .......
BRIGHAM YOUNG

89
54
52
51
53
32
37

51
39
20
18
10
27
16

140
93
72
69
63
59
53

2
4
2
13
0
4
8

No. Asst.

Total

Loss

Cary Whittingham, LB ........
Mary Allen, LB ...............
Kurt Gouveia, LB ..........
Leon White, LB ...............
Steve Haymond, S ............
Brad Smith, NG ... .......

51
53
43
43
35
37

96
78
64
47
49
41

147
131
107
90
84
78

1
4
5
4
0
0

The BYU campus in Provo, Utah. A true combination of academic, athletic and religious excellence.

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each student, mormon or not, to sign a
statement that says they will not use
alcohol, drugs or tobacco. And it goes
without saying that each BYU student
will abstain from pre-marital sex.
THORNTON SAID that the church of-
ficials term it "a word of wisdom" that
the students should honor. "It's mainly
just an honor code," said Thornton.
"They don't come out and police it."
Regardless of the degree of enfor-
cement, Thornton claims that most
students choose to follow the doctrine.
One piece of evidence that suggests
the students do heed the code of conduct
is high marriage rate. Currently about
22 percent of BYU students are
married. At least 16 of the top 70
Brigham Young football players are
married.
BUT THORNTON points to two
reasons, besides the strict Mormon
faith, that might influence the
marriage rates of students.
"I think it's the Western culture for
one thing," she said, emphasizing that
schools in the West tend to be more
marriage-oriented than those of the
Midwest and East.
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The second factor is the LDS missions
that many Mormon young people un-
dertake. These missions are en-
couraged by the church elders, but
remain "completely volunteer."
"MOST MALE members (about 85%)
of the church go on missions. They are
called to a certain area of the world for
18 months," Thornton said. Therefore,
the men come to school older and ready
to settle down.
While men become eligible for a
missionary post at age 19, the women
must wait until they're 21. According to
Thornton, "women are getting an
education in preparation for
marriage." Thornton did point out,
though, that the church was better
recognizing women's increasing role in
the work force.
The students receive no college credit
for the time they spend on the religious
trip. But 8,000 of the BYU students
return bilingual and receive foriegn
language credit for this.
MANY MEMBERS of the Cougar
football team have at one time or
another, been church missionaries. The
period of service acts as sort of a

natural red-shirting year, giving the
players a chance to mature both
physically and mentally.
Head football coach LaVelle Edwards
has attributed the ventures as
strengthening agents for his team.
They are allowed a chance to develop
as individuals.
"It's a different environment here,"
Edwards said. "There are a very set
amount of rules that all students have
to abide by. We really have a very in-
teresting mixture-Mormons, non-
Mormons, blacks and quite a few
Polynesians. But it's really a pretty
typical football team.
The Cougar gridders are about two-
thirds Mormon, most of whom have ex-
perienced the missionary duties. One
notable exception, however is BYU fire-
thrower Robbie Bosco. While Bosco is a
member of LDS, he will not go on a
foreign mission, citing his calling is to
be a quarterback.
"I think it is a pretty typical team as
far as religion is concerned," said the
junior. "The team prays before the
game, but I think all teams have some
sort of pre-game prayer."

Daily Photo
Vince Bean and Sim Nelson high five it in the endzone
Northwestern. Michigan blanked the Wildcats, 31-0
Jokisch looks on with a smile.
Interceptions

MICHIGAN

No.

Brad Cochran .4................ 4
Rodney Lyles ........... . .. .. . . . . 4
BRIGHAM YOUNG
No.

Mark Allen ....
Mary Allen ....
Kyle Morrell ..

4
4
3

....................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 . .

MAI
REST
Servin
Lunch
SPECIAL
Beer, Wi
Open Daily
Sunday,
307S
66

Punting

MICHIGAN

No.

Yds.

Ave.

_ _ _ _ " rL

Monte Robbins ....................
BRIGHAM YOUNG
Lee Johnson ..... ........... .

55
No.

2431
Yds

44.2
Avg.

57

2593

45.5

Morrell

... BYU's best defensive back

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