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December 07, 1984 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Is
Tax plan
WASHINGTON (AP) - The White
House, convinced in the words of one of-
ficial that so-called tax reform will be
"very, very difficult" to achieve,
clearly is planning to relegate that
issue to the back burner as it concen-
trates first on pushing it budget cuts
through Congress.
Although President Reagan will send
Congress his proposal for major
changes in the federal income tax
system by the end of January, White
House strategists are saying outright in
private that they expect the proposal to
languish for quite a while before any
action is taken.
BUT, WHEN Reagan gets around to
trying to sell his tax changes, it seems
apparent the president will stop
referring to "tax simplification," as he
has been calling it for a year, and start
referring to Tax fairness," which is
likely to have a bigger - and more
positive - impact on voters.
a1
/

will proceed slowly

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PREPARE FOR:

1

The Michigan Daily- Friday, December 7, 1984 - Page 9
BOOK SHOP SALE

Whatever it is called, one official,
who spoke on the condition he not be
named, said, "A major tax reform is
going to take a lot of time.... We would
hope we could get something con-
sidered this year."
The first step, in the view of this of-
ficial, is to "develop bipartisan support
for the initial proposal," and to get the
appropriate congressional committees
to begin considering the plan, which
probably will be some version of the
modified flat tax proposed last week by
Treasury Secretary Donald Regan.
"AND THEN you will have a very
lengthy process of hearings and a sub-
stantial amount of negotiation over
many aspects of that very complex
reform" among the White House,
Congress and various interest groups,
he said.
This official and others in the White
House have made it clear that the cuts

Reagan proposes in the fiscal 1986
budget will have priority.
But he refused to concede that after
an all-out effort to push those cuts
through Congress the White House may
not have enough political capital left to
mount the kind of major campaign
needed to change the tax system -
especially if Reagan sticks to his in-
sistence that the tax revision plan not
be used as a method of reducing the
enormous federal deficit.
"I think seriously that if we're able to
develop the (tax reform) proposal that
there is potential to generate as much
public support for tax fairness and
reforming the current tax system as
there is for spending cuts," the official
said.
But he described it as "very, very dif-
ficult," saying: "I'm trying to be
realistic in terms of the legislative
process. It will just be a slower
process."

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tampus papers
BATON ROUGE, La. (CPS) - BUT REVEII
Charging violation of first amendment Strother argu
rights, the Louisiana State University newspaper in th
student newspaper, "The Daily violates the pape
Reveille," is suing LSU for banning all rights to determin
abortion and pregnancy-related adver- policy.
tising from school publications: "The editor ant
The charge is the most serious of a be responsible for
number of recent incidents as pro and says. "It's not a
anti-abortion forces square off on cam- issue. The admini
puses nationwide. students' right toi
AT VILLANOVA University in Pen- "The administ
nsylvania, the Catholic university's such freedom of
administrators ordered the campus Villanovan editor.
newspaper editor to pull an ad offering THE WEEKf
birth control informaton. ban, Marusak w
At California's Oxnard Community cusing the admini
College, the "Campus Observer" staff and of suppress:
and faculty advisor were bombarded because it feelsi
with protests from students and faculty fantastical way be
for accepting a pro-life political adver- Villanovan facu
tisement in the weeks before the Nov. 6 countered the acc
election, edition saying,"
And Eastern Washington University against the teach
students were unpleasantly surprised the Catholic Chu
recently when unappetizing anti-abor- trouble it would ci
tion flyers appeared on cafeteria Villanova stud
tables. e buttebn
THE LSU BAN stems from a business ned about the ban
officer's question about the suitability THE PAPER
of "pregnancy-related" advertisemen- supporting the e
ts contracted by an independent ad two supporting th
agency to appear in a student directory. At Oxnard C
"The complaint raised the question, much reaction to
'Do we want to advertise for abortion?" in the Campus
explains LSU Vice; Chancellor for faculty adviso
Student Affairs L. L. Pesson. editorial defendii
"We talked to the student health sibility to uphol'
director and deternined the ads were speech right.
in the best interests of the students," he Students and
says. "The director felt it best to send labeled the ad "in
students to the clinic first for advice tually inaccurat(
and help, then if necessary, point them staff's judgment:
in the right direction for an abortion MORGAN ad
clinic." "definitely graph

LLE editor Dane
es including the
he campus-wide ban
er's first amendment
ne its own advertising
id ad manager should
r all advertising," he
pro-life or pro-choice
stratin is limiting the
information."
;ration should allow
expression," agrees
Joseph Marusak. -
following Villanova's
rote an editorial ac-
stration of censorship
ing "opposing views
its own may in some
e damaged."
arty advisor June Lytel
cusations in the same
"I knew the ad was
ings of Villanova and
rch, and I knew the
ause if it ran."
ents seem unconcer-
, Marusak notes.
received two letters
editor's position, and
e ban.
ollege, however, too
a graphic pro-life ad
Observer prompted
r Gary Morgan's
ng the paper's respon-
d the pro-lifers' free
d faculty members
n poor taste" and "fac-
e" and questioned the
in accepting it.
mitted the ad was
hic" and the paper did.

debate abortion

not endorse it, but the Campus Obser-
ver does "believe in the precepts of the
First Amendment and cannot deny ac-
cess so long as advertisers adhere to its
advertising code."
Eastern Washington University
students objected as well when graphic
pro-life flyers appeared on cafeteria
tables last month.
The flyers advertised on anti-abortion
film scheduled for campus showing and
sponsored by Kampus Sonshine
Ministries.
DINING service manager Liane
Smith had not approved the flyers,
although she had approved previous
ministry leafletting.
While the Oxnard and EWU adver-
tisements stirred little lasting con-
troversy, the LSU and Villanova
episodes still fester.
LSU and the Reveille met in federal
court this week.
AND WHILE editor Strother hopes to
settle out of court before then, LSU's
Pesson says, "the university has no in-
clinaton to settle out of court."
"We don't see it as a first amendment
question," he adds. "We'd like to
determine the constitutionality of the
question. We assume the university has
the right to accept or reject ads."
At Villanova, a scheduled hearing on
editor Marusak's refusal to pull the bir-
th control ad has not yet taken place.
Marusak says the administration
probably prefers not to pursue the mot-
ter.
The Villanovan staff probably will
encounter the same administrative ban
for any future controversial adver-
tisement, Marusak predicts.
"But," he adds, "if that ad came
across my desk today, I'd run it."

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for Winter Term 1985
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