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September 07, 1984 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-07

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Page 12 - The Michigan Daily- Friday, September 7, 1984
YOU'RE ALL
CHECKED. IN.
NOW CHECK
USOUT
Li nens n things
SAVE 20-40%
L TOWELS
Q TUB MATS
L SHEETS & PILLOWCASES-
INCLUDING EXTRA-LONG
TWIN FITTED
Li COMFORTER
SHAM
DUST
RUFFLE
LTOSS PILLOWS
L BEDREST
Li BLANKETS
i PILLOW PROTECTORS
Li QUILTED
MATTRESS
PAD-
INCLUDING
EXTRA-LONG
TWIN FITTED
Li BEDSPREAD
Li THROW RUGS
Li HANGERS
Li PICTURES
Li LAUNDRY BAG
Li SHOE STACK & SHOE BAG
Li PORTABLE CLOTHES

DRYER
Li HOOKS
L CLIP-ON LIGHTS
Q SOAP BOX
L TOOTHBRUSH TUBE
Li SHOWER CURTAIN
Li VINYL MATTRESS COVER-
INCLUDING
EXTRA-LONG TWIN

'U' counseling services vital

By MARLA GOLD
The University should not cut its
counseling services' budgets further
and needs to continuously review its
programs, according to a University
report.
The main reason for the review of the
counseling services was to see if the $6
million budget "was going where it was
needed," said Vice President for
Student Services Henry Johnson.
"AT THIS TIME, no conclusive
answers have been drawn," said John-
son. The review was prepared for John-
son, the vice president in charge of
counseling services, and Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Provost Billy
Frye in charge of the University's
general fund budget.
The task force, which spent two years
reviewing 63 counseling services, has
recommended that the University not
implement any more budget cuts to
counseling and that a committee con-
tinuously review the equality of their
services.
The task force, made up of students,
professors, and directors of various
counseling services, concluded that
some services may need more money to
serve the number of students that come
in for help.
DR. GERALD Marsden, director for
the Counseling Center on Huron Street
and co-chairman of the task force, said
"there aren't enough resources to go
around" since the budget cuts.
The budget cuts are part of a five-
year plan to reallocate $20 million
dollar's within the University's general
fund budget to store up "high priority"
areas.
According to the study, less than 10
percent of counseling funding is chan-
neled into areas toward helpingstuden-
ts with severe problems.
ONE SUCH service is 76-GUIDE, a
crisis line, which was forced to cut its
24-hour service back to 5 p.m. to 10 a.m.
in 1981, and shuts down completely in
the summer.

Marsden said that the psychology
clinic in the Counseling Service is a
"last chance" - helping people with
severe emotional problems. He said
that his office occasionally has to shut
the doors on people who need help
because the staff is overbooked and
there is no time to schedule more
patients.
"It is clear that there are people with
severe problems that need help that
aren't getting it," he said.
BUT NOT everyone agrees that the
money for severely disabled students is
inadequate.
Johnson said that if the allocations
were different than the report showed,
"I'd be scared."
He said that most students who come

to the University do not normally need
extensive help, so the small percentage
of funds given to areas in which more
highly trained conselors requiring
higher pay are needed is adequate.
THE SECOND recommendation of
the task force, to have an ongoing
committee to review all counseling
programs, is a first step toward
assessing the quality of services.
students receive-something not
analyzed in the review. "We need to
watch between what is needed and what
is there," Marsden said.
Dr. Charles Judge, Director of
Academic Services in LSA said that in
academic counseling, the demand out-
weighs the availability of services,
especially during class registration. He

Free program already
By THOMAS HRACH waiting lists."
Despite the myriad of counseling ser- THE PROFESSIONAL Counseli
vices available at the University and in Services staff primarily handl'
the city, those that do not charge a fee serious emergencies, while simpl
are plagued by too many patients and cases, such as depression, are usual
not enough volunteers. turned over to the volunteers
Part of the recent rise in counseling GUIDE, a free consultation servic
can be attributed to the state's mental manned by students.
institutions, said Weicher van Houten, The 76-GUIDE phone number
director of the University's outpatient widely publicized as a counseling se
psychiatry clinic. vice for students, but a lack of volu
"PERHAPS today people are more teers forced the service to close for ti
willing to discuss their problems," he summer. Callers are greeted by
said, "but there is also a tendency to recording referring them to other me
move people out of state hospitals, too tal health services.
quickly. Many of the patients shouldn't While free services are availablet
be out on the streets." students seeking immediate care, ver
The patient load has also increased at little free help is available beyond t
facilities designed for students with initial consultation.
mental and emotional problems. "OUR SERVICE is only the fro
During the busiest periods-the late fall line," said Zaid. "It's our job to help tb
and early winter-the psychological students get to those that can he
counseling service in the Union cannot them. Counseling Services refe
keep up with its caseload.. students with serious problems such a
"During our busy times of the year," drug abuse or suicidal tendenciest
said clinical social worker Joan Zaid of professional services for which stude
Counseling Services, "we take all the ts must foot the bill.
patients initially but on return visits The University's Counseling Centi
we're forced to put less serious cases on on Huron Street offers a free cor

ng
es
er
ly
at
ice
is
r-
in-
:he
a
!n-
to
pry
he
nt
he
.p
rs
as
to
sn-
:er
on-

also attributes the problem to the.
budget cuts throughout the University';-
not only in counseling services.
"With less money all over, more.
probems fall on us," he said.
One example is that classes close
faster with fewer faculty members
teaching, so students now go td
academic counseling with this problem.
"A fair amount of that could be
streamlined," perhaps using a com-3.:
puter system to tell a student if, for
example, their distribution
requirements have been met, Marsden
said. Then, more money could be char
neled into counseling for students whg:
need it more, he said.
This story originally appeared in'<:
the Daily's summer edition.
rierloaded [,.-
sultation and then charges an hourly.
fee for testing and treatment b
graduate clinical psychology students.
"WE CAN fix a person's medical
problems, but then we must decide if its
safe for them to go home. Many times'-
we're forced to send a patient to othe,
clinics," said social worker Jai
Callahan of Health Services.
Several professional off-campus ser-
vices are also available for a fee, but
many students who seek psychiatricZr.
help often need little more than t
sympathetic ear offered by volunteers.:
But volunteers are sometimes'hard W:
find, so the SOS Community Crisis Cen,-:
ter in Ypsilanti holds three volunteef
recruiting drives each year.
Volunteers at SOS must undergo 65
hours of training before working the
phones. "We look for caring, non'
judgemental attitudes in our volun-
teers," said SOS Director Maureen
Wilkes. "Basically we look for open-
minded people who want to help."

This story originally appeared iii
the Daily's summer edition.

x

Motor City stuntman sets stadium record

'A

By CHARLIE SEWELL
Ninety-six hours and twelve minutes
after he began, Jim Purol sat in the last
of 101,701 seats in the Michigan Football
Stadium in June.
"Monotony was the most difficult
thing about it," said Purol shortly after
completing the stunt. The sitting
marathon raised nearly $3,500 for the
American Lung Association, according
to Purol's press agent. Purol has now
performed a total of 10 stunts to benefit
a variety of charities.
IN HIS four days in the stadium,
Purol slept only five and a half hours.
During the day he had to be coated with
suntan lotion and sprayed with water
periodically.
Despite the lack of sleep and a little
stiffness in his legs and shoulders,
Purol said he felt good. To help him
perform the stunt he stuffed a pad into
the seat of his pants and used specially
designed hand-held tools to protect his
hands from blistering as he moved
along the stadium benches. "I've been
working out for about eight months. I
(haven't got the biggest arms, but I had
enough to make it," he said.
As he drove out of the stadium
parking lot at 2:45 p.m., Purol was on
his way to a 4 p.m. appearance on
television'sn"Good Afternoon Detroit".
"I'm running on adrenalin right now,"
he said. "Tonight I'll sleep."
But Purol has little time for rest. He
performs a nightly comedy musical act
at a Detroit nightclub where he is
known as Jim Mouth, a name he earned
by performing such feats as smoking
140 cigarettes for five minutes and puf-

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
Jim "Mouth Purol takes a seat in Michigan Stadium in June during his attempt to sit in all of the 101,701 seats.

fing on 40 cigars for a similar period of
time.
Mouth hopes the Guiness Book of
World Records will publish his newest
record and create a new category he
calls "stadium sitting." Presently he
holds five Guiness records and five un-

published records which the publishers
of the record book say are too ridiculous
to be published.
Mouth cited several unusual records
which do appear in the book, making
the publishers' use of the term.
ridiculous seem contradictory. "I told

(the publishers) I was the self-
proclaimed world's record holder of the
most world records and they told met,
couldn't do that. Who do they think they
are?" Purol joked during his marathon.

I

This story originally appeared in
the Daily's summer edition.. M

{
$ ry #

Lots of
Usable
Reusables
450.
72 C

U' bureaucracy runs

own numbers racket

a roe

By THOMAS HRACH
Contrary to the popular campus
belief, the tenth digit on the familiar
yellow student identification card is not
just another random bit of
bureaucracy.
As every post-orientation freshperson
knows, the student's social security
number makes up the first nine digits of
the ID number.
BUT THE MYSTERIOUS tenth num-
ber comes from a complex
mathematical formula derived from
the social security number.
This "check digit" is derived from a
series of multiplications, summations
PART-TIME
EMPLOYMENT -
NIGHTS

and finally one division whose remain
der becomes the magic number.
"The check digit determines if the
student number is correct at the time of
entry into any computer system," said
Associate Registrar Harris Olsen. "It
helps prevent errors, and is a common
practice in many different industries."
AS AN OPERATOR enters a student
number into one of the many computer
terminals on campus which thrive on
students' personal records, the corn-
puter applies the mathematical for-
mula to the first nine digits. If the com-
puter and the terminal operator
disagree about what the tenth digit
should be, the computer sounds a war-
ning which is designed to prevent
mistakes in academic, financial, and,
personal records.
Yet the shroud of ignorance still -
covers the misunderstood tenth digit.
Most students never consider the final
digit's purpose or assume its existence

I MASTERCARD 0 BANKAMERICARD/VISA I
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