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November 27, 1984 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'Bomb' at
airport
blamed on
police dog
DETROIT (UPI)-The main ter-
minal at Detroit Metropolitan Airport
was evacuated for about a half hour
yesterday by a bomb that wasn't a
bomb, just a small bottle of men's
cologne.
If all that sounds a little confusing,
blame it on a bomb-sniffing dog who
apparently had an off day or perhaps a
head cold that affected his olfactory
powers.
THE WHOLE episode began around
mid-morning when an employee at the
Eastern Airlines ticket counter in the
South Terminal got a little concerned
about a briefcase or small suitcase sit-
ting unattended nearby.
"After a period of time, I'd say an
hour or so, one of the counter people
called the sheriff's deputy and said,
'That bag has been there for a long
period of time. Would you kindly
remove it or look at it,"' said airport
Spokesman Lou Sugo.
"At this point, the sheriff's deputy
followed normal procedure and that's
'Better safe than sorry' and called in a
bomb dog," Sugo said.
THAT'S WHEN things got exciting.
The way the specially trained dog reac-
ted convinced authorities that there
Was a bomb in the bag-or a good chan-
ce there was one, Sugo said.
"At this point you have to assume
that the dog knows what it is," Sugo
said.
Airport officials immediately
evacuated about 200 people from the
r South Terminal, the largest of three
terminals at the airport, while police
gingerly toted the suspicious bag to an
open field nearby.
Police actually detonated the bag,
leading many to believe initially that
there was indeed a bomb inside. And
that was the word that got around until
police examined what was left of the
bag and its contents.
"A small bottle of men's cologne,"
Sugo said later when the dust had set-
, tled.
Sugo said the method used to explode
a suspicious package led many obser-
vers to believe-erroneously, as it tur-
ned out-that there was a bomb inside.
Bomb experts fired a shot at the bag,
causing it to explode, he said.
Even though it was a false alarm,
Sugo had nothing but praise for the way
police handled the crisis.
"The alternative of not believing the
dog is a little chancey," he said.

Uruguayan

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 27, 1984 - Page 7
president-elect

appeals for cooperation

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) -President-elect Julio
Sanguinetti of the centrist Colorado Party appealed for unity
yesterday after his party won a decisive election victory to
replace the military regime that has ruled since 1973.
The jubilant Sanguinetti made his plea as exhausted
celebrants straggled home after a huge street party marred
by confrontations between rightist and leftist youths
following Sunday's balloting.
"THE COUNTRY NEEDS five years of combined effort to
reinforce its deomocratic institutions," the 48-year-old
lawyer and political journalist said in a speech to supporters.
"If the new government does not get the backing of all par-
ties, we have failed to learn the lessons of the past 11 years,"
he said.
Under an accord approved by the government of Gregorio
Alvarez, the general serving as president in the current
military regime, the elected civilian government will take of-
fice March 1. Sanguinetti is to serve a five-year term.
THE COLORADO PARTY had 744,999 votes for 38.4 per-
cent of the total in official returns from all but 75 of the coun-
try's 7,873 polling stations.

The Colorados' traditional opposition, the National Party,
had 634,166 votes for 32.8 percent. A coalition of leftist parties
called the Broad Front had 393,949 votes for 20.4 percent.
Votes cast for smaller parties or challenged by election of-
ficials made up the remaining 8.4 percent.
THE COLORADOS captured 13 of the 30 senate seats while
National party members won 11 seats and the Broad Front
6.
Precise figures were not available for the 99-member.
House of Representatives, but, since cross-party voting is not
allowed, the percentage of seats won by each party will not
vary greatly from the percentage in the presidential race.
The Colorado Party won 12 of the chief administrative
posts for the country's 19 provinces, including that of Mon-
tevideo, where about half of Uruguay's 2.8 million people
live. The National Party won the top elected jobs in the seven
other departments.
ALBERTO ZUMARAN, the National Party presidential
candidate, went to Sanguinetti's headquarters to concede
defeat. He embraced the victors as onlookers chanted, "A
people united will never be vanquished."

African hijackers extend deadline

Embassy bombing Associated Press
This is all that remains of a compact car under which a bomb exploded
yesterday afternoon near the U.S. Embassy in Bogota, Columbia. The at-
tack, which killed one Colombian woman and injured five others, came days
after U.S. diplomats left Colombia under threats from cocaine smugglers
who are angry about plans to extradite Colombians to the U.S. for prosec-
ution.
Course evaluation
suffers postponement

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) -
Five hijackers, led by a Somali army
captain, postponed until this morning a
threat to blow up a Somali Airlines
Boeing 707 with themselves and 103
hostages aboard. An Ethiopian official
said negotiations had reached at "a
ielicate and extremely difficult stage."
It was the fourth time the hijackers
had put off the ultimatum since they
seized the plane Saturday on a flight
from the Somali capital of Mogadishu
and forced it to fly to neighboring
Ethiopia. The jetliner had been bound
for Jidda, Saudi Arabia.
ONE AMERICAN, whose name has
not been disclosed by the U.S. Embassy
here, is on the plane, as are two Italians
and an Egyptian. No further break-
down of the nationalities of the

passengers was given.
An American diplomat, keeping an
airport vigil, remarked: "The longer
these things go on, usually the better
they turn out."
The air pirates oppose the gover-
nment of Somali President Mohamed
Siad Barre. Somalia and Ethiopia have
been bitter foes in the Horn of Africa for
centuries and have no diplomatic

relations, but the Ethiopian Foreign
Ministry has acted as an intermediary
between the hijackers and the Somali
government.
The hijackers demanded that
Somalia release to neighboring Djibouti
seven Somali youths sentenced to death
for subversive activities, and 14
prominent political prisoners.

*@0**s
s
"
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C 1.75 TUESDfAY ALL DfAY

(Continued from Page 1)
"FRANKLY, I can't babysit a
thousand professors," said Layman.
He added that his committee suffers
from a lack of totally committed. par-
ticipants. In addition to Layman, 12
other students serve on the committee.
But at least two say they cannot devote
as much time to the booklet as is
needed.
Several LSA seniors interviewed
waiting in line for CRISP said they had
never made an active effort to obtain
ADVICE in the past. And although
many students have referred to it in
previous terms some said there have
been a number of noticeable problems
with the booklet.
Rich Wiedis has found the course
evaluations "generally accurate," but
is bothered because he thinks "students
HAIRSTYLISTS
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who really have something to bitch
about won't stay in the class until the
end."
Most students say they are adjusting
to registration without ADVICE.
"In the past it has been a pretty ac-
curate gauge of classes, said Larry
Rottinick, an LSA senior who had to
adapt this term by "learning about my
classes purely by word-of-mouth."
LSA senior Eric Girdler thought the
booklet was helpful both times he used
it, but noted that he "canusually find
the blow-off classes without it."

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