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November 21, 1984 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-21

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4

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 21, 1984

Van D1
By BRAD MORGAN
What do consistent execution, mental
toughness, and giving 100 percent at all
times add up to?
For the Michigan women's basketball
team anyhow, the answer to that
question is "A New Beginning"-the
slogan for this year's hoopsters and fir-
st-year head coach Bud Van De Wege,
Jr.
VAN DE WEGE, a 1980 University
graduate, has worked in the men's
program for the past eight years, in-
cluding the last three as an assistant to
Bill Frieder. He takes over from Gloria
Soluk, who compiled a dismal 66-120
record in her seven years at Michigan
and left Van De Wege a program on the
decline.
With a new head coach, new players,
and a new outlook on the game, it's un-
derstandable then that the team has
selected that slogan for its motto this
year, and Van De Wege views that new
beginning in promising terms.
"We've got to be realistic and not ex-
pect too much too soon, but I know we'll
improve," Van De Wege said. "We've
set only the most basic, fundamental of
goals-to go out and improve each
game from now until the end of the
season."
THIS IMPROVEMENT will hinge on
the players learning Van De Wege's
system and then learning to play it con-
sistently. Consistency, in fact, is one of
the problem areas that Van De Wege
sees right now.
"We need to execute a lot better, to
get a higher degree of consistency in
execution," he commented. "They (the
players) don't always focus in on the
play they're supposed to be running,
but that will come with experience."
Saturday at 2 p.m. against Northern
Michigan, that experience will come in
the form of senior co-captain Diana
Wiley.
WILEY, A CENTER from Flint
Beecher High School, is a three-time
letter winner at Michigan and one of
only two seniors on the team (the other
is co-captain Connie Doutt). More im-
portantly, she is considered by Van De
Wege to be the team's leader on the
court.
"She's definitely our leader. She
takes charge. She always makes her
best effort to be a leader, and we really
need her out there," the coach said.
Joining Wiley in the starting lineup
Saturday in Crisler Arean will be 6-0

Wege takes helm

Women cagers open
Saturday vs. NMU

junior Wendy Bradetich, the team's
leading scorer (18.2 points per game) a
year ago, at one forward spot; 6-0
freshman Lorea Feldman at the other;
5-8 junior Orethia Lilly and freshman
Kelly Benintendi (5-9) will start at
guards.
SARAH BASFORD, a highly touted
high school star from Farmington Our
Lady of Mercy who was considered
Michigan's top recruit, was set to start
at guard but was scratched after stret-

ching ligaments in her right thumb in
practice Monday. The injury will keep
Basford on the sidelines for four weeks,
an untimely blow since she had been
playing well up to that time.
"She started slowly but has really
emerged in the past week. She always
executed the play the way you want it
done," said Van De Wege of his top
freshman.
While this frosh class is really a

product of ex-coach Gloria Soluk, Van
De Wege is optimistic about recruiting
in the years to come, especially in-state
players. The program has been
criticized in years past for neglecting
in-state talent and recruiting poorly,
but Van De Wege says that period is
over.
"OUR PHILOSOPHY now is to turn
our recruiting to the state of
Michigan," he said. "We have to let
players know we're interest and also
what kind of program we have for them
here.
"I feel that even if a girl doesn't go
here, from now on we should at least be
one of her final choices," he continued.
While recruiting is important, it's
still the play of the team and their
ability to improve on last year's 2-16
Big Ten record (4-22 overall) that will
be remembered, a fact Van De Wege is
well aware of.
"WE CAN IMPROVE, and still not
move up in the Big Ten because the
league is so improved," explained the
coach. "What I'm more concerned with
though is our approach to the game
mentally. If we keep our intensity and
mental toughness at a high level, we
are very capable."
Indeed, the Big Ten is improved. Ohio
State, 17-1 in the conference a year ago,
is returning four starters and is favored
to repeat as champion. Close behind,
though, will be Iowa, Michigan State,
Illinois, and Indiana, with the
Hawkeyes expected to give the
Buckeyes their stiffest challenge.
With these obstacles staring him in
the face, Van De Wege's main first-
year goal is a simple one.
"MY BIGGEST goal is just to see
them play as hard as they can and as
smart as they can," he said.
This statement fits in well with Van De
Wege's personal philosophy of how he
wants the team run.
"My only real philosophy is that my
players always give me 100 percent and
never just go through the motions. They
have to compete," he emphasized.
WILL ALL this mental toughness and
emphasis on execution lead to im-
proved results? Van De Wege thinks so.
"Eventually we're going to start
doing things right, and it's going to pay
off."
With that type of attitude, it shouldn't
take long for the "New Beginning" to
lead to a "New End"-more games in
the win column for the women's
basketball team.

ByDouglas B. Levy
lucky Blue gets big bowl
L UCK IS a beautiful thing. Said the wiseman: "I'd rather be lucky than
good."
As Bo Schembechler would most assuredly agree, "That sucker is right."
In a season where nothing has gone its way, Michigan stands on the
precipice of a remarkable turn-a-round.
The 6-5 Wolverines are on the verge of being officially invited to the
Holiday Bowl and a matchup against the nation's numero uno - Brigham
Young.
Talk about luck. It's all over the place. Michigan is lucky just to be enter-
taining visions of possibly bowl hysteria. And let's face it, Brigham Young is
lucky to even have an opportunity to be declared the 1984 National Champion
of college football.
Michigan happens to be a quality team, despite the 6-5 record, the sixth-
place finish in the Big Ten standings, the fact that the Wovlerines haven't
won two consecutive games in seven weeks and the fact that the squad hasn't
been listed among the nations top twenty since long before Indira Gandhi's
assassination (that was crude).
And as the legend so astutely pointed out at his press luncheon on Monday
past, "What are there, 18 bowls? That's 36 teams that have got to play in a
bowl game," reasoned Schembechler. No doubt about it, the Wolverines are
one of the best 36 college teams in the United States.
Just for the fun of being realistic, let's examine the BYU Cougars, who
boast a team consisting two-thirds of Mormons (the religious persuasion
that reigns supreme in glamorous Utah).
Brigham Young, under the guidance of 13-year head coach, Lavelle Ed-
wards, has put together an 11-0 1984 mark. And the Cougars can even claim
to be legitimate. Since 1976, BYU has compiled a beautiful 91-18 record and
has played in something like seven-consecutive Holiday Bowls. Ho hum.
But who have these jokers played? The Cougars compete in the Western
Athletic Conference. It's a friendly conference, it plays tackle football and
the teams have nice, bright-colored uniforms. But to give you an idea of the
level of football played, Northwestern would be top dog in such a league.
Brigham Young, under the guidance of 13-year head coach, Lavelle Ed-
wards, has put together an 11-0 1984 mark. And the Cougars can even claim
to be legitimate. Since 1976, BYU has compiled a beautiful 91-18 record and
has played in something like seven-consecutive Holiday Bowls. Ho hum.
But who have these jokers played? The Cougars compete in the Western
Athletic Conference. It's a friendly conference, it plays tackle football and
the teams have nice, bright-colored uniforms. But to give you an idea of the
level of football played, Northwestern would be top dog in such a league.
Wow, BYU has given the professional ranks such luminaries as quarter-
backs Gifford Nielson, Marc Wilson, Jim McMahon, Brigham Young's
great-great-great grandson and next year, Robbie Boscoe. Ho hum.
The Holiday is still the most minor of bowl games. It is played on Decem-
ber 21, before Christmas vacation even begins at most universities. Except
for this year, no one in his right mind would care about the outcome of the
Holiday Bowl.
Put BYU on the same field with Nebraska, Oklahoma, Wisconsin or even
Notre Dame and see what would happen.
In 1982, Ohio State was condemned to San Diego and annihilated the
Cougars, 47-17. How lame is the Holiday Bowl? Indiana went in 1979 and
came away with a 38-37 thriller.
Who does BYU play during the season? Teams like Tulsa, Colorado State,
Wyoming (a lot of fine talent comes out of Wyoming), New Mexico, Utah and
Utah State.
How unimportant is the Holiday Bowl? Well, it has never had a television
contract and it doesn't have one this year.
But this year is different, a national championship is on the line. Luck is
beautiful.

-4

Junior Wendy Bradetich, shown here in
action earlier in her career, is back to
lead Michigan into its season opener
Saturday agianst Northern Michigan.
Bradetich led the team in scoring a
year ago.

Daily Photo

METRO AIRPORT
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL
$750 ROUND TRIP
N Advance Ticket Purchase Required
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
U of M Student Union Ticket Office
Ann Arbor Bus Station
CONTINUOUS SERVICE FROM THE UNION
TUES., NOV. 20th, WED. NOV. 21st - ALL DAY
THURS. NOV. 22nd - TILL NOON
SHORTWAY - JETPORT EXPRESS
800-552-3700

FOOTBALL CHAMPS GET CROWNED:
Righteous Ones keep title

4

The dynasty rolls on. After winning
residence hall championships in '82 and
'83, the members of the Rumsey 'A'
team decided to move into the indepen-
dent league as the Righteous Ones.
They have now won two-straight in-
dependent titles.
An amazing fourth-quarter rally gave
the Righteous Ones their latest cham-
pionship Monday with a 22-14 victory
over Legal Soul.
Trailing 14-6 with less than three
minutes left, Righteous Ones quarter-

back Dave Collins threw fourth-down
bomb to Tom Phelps. The conversion was
good, tying the score at 14. And when
the Righteous Ones got the ball back,
Phelps threw another fourth-down pass
deep to John Bonnell. Bonnell made an
over-the shoulder grab to clinch the
championship.
West Quad Chicago 14,J
Reeves Rollers 0
In residence hall action, the West
Quad Chicago Creamers shut out the
Reeves Rollers 14-0 to capture the B
playoff crown of the "B" division.
Ray Bauer had two interceptions and
Steve Ludwig added another for the
Creamer defense which blanked the
opposition in all its playoff games.
Quarterback Allen Wolfson was

USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

ice the win. .
Party Animals 12, Bush
Busters 8
"We may be small, but we're scrap-
py." That was Party Animal Phuong
Hoang's comment after her team beat
the Bush Busters 12-8 to clinch the
Women's "B" crown.
The Party Animals took the lead in
the second quarter when Krista Dunton
returned an interception 45 yards for
the first score of the game. Gwendolyn
Haynes caught a Barb McQuade touch-
down pass entry in the third quarter to
put the Animals on top 12-0.
Bush threatened late in the game, but
was unable to score more than one TD
on the Animal defense. McQuade, who
manages the Party Animals in additon
to playing quarterback, remarked
"They had a definite size advantage,
but we played them tough."

0

4

responsible for both the Creamer
touchdowns, running one in and passing
for the other.
Sigma Alpha Mu 0, Phi
Delta Theta 0
In the defensive battle of the year,
Sigma Alpha Mu out-penetrated Phi
Delta Theta by mere inches to capture
the fraternity "B " championship.
The game was pulled out by the Sa-
mmy defensive line of Rich Wiener and
Jeff Yosowitch, who sacked the Phi
Delts' quarterback on their third down
in overtime. On the Phi Delts' last play,
they completed a pass that left them a
few inches short of the 50-yard line.
Sammy quarterback Paul Scnell tossed
the ball out of bounds on fourth down to

IM roundup was compiled by
Jon Hartmann
SCORES
Fraternity A - A Playoffs
sigma Alpha Mu beat Sigma Phi Epsilon in overtime
Psi Upsilon beat Phi Gamma Delta in overtime
Sigma Alpha Epsilon beat Sigma Alpha Mu in overtime
Phi Delta Theta 20, Psi Upsilon 0
Fraternity A - B playoffs
Alpha Tau Omega 16, Chi Phi 12
Phi Kappa Tau 14, Kappa Sigma 0
Lambda Chi Alpha 14, Alpha Epsilon Pi6
Alpha Phi Alpha 10, Triangle 0
Alpha Tau Omega 50, Phi Kappa Taiu0
Alpha Phi Alpha 14, Lambda Chi Alpha 8
Independent A - A playoffs
Righteous Ones 14, MBA#10
BSH's 14, Patterson Dental 0
Ledger's Unlimited beat Elitest Bast in overtime
Legal Soul 14, Bruisers 6
Righteous Ones 28, BSH's 22
Legal Soul 24, Ledger's Unlimited 22

Davis AL's top rookie

NEW YORK (AP) - Seattle first
baseman Alvin Davis, who started the
season in the minor leagues, yesterday

Twins was fourth with five.
Davis, 24, started the season with the
Mariners' Salt Lake City farm club and

l

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