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November 16, 1984 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-16

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 16, 1984
Smokeout igi
By ELENA DEUTSCH keep fror
with wire reports midnight;
Almost 18.5 million smokers across the nation ANYON
tried to kick the habit yesterday during the cluding n
Great American Smokeout sponsored by the offered si
American Cancer Society. stores an
At the University, about 100 students, faculty, and "Most
staff members - both smokers and non-smokers - doing it ft
participated in a program sponsored by Health Ser- the Unive
vices which included a raffle of prizes from local to try to q
businesses. Garnett
"THE SMOKEOUT is a nice way to get smokers departme
and non-smokers to cooperate on the smoking issue," smokeout
said Mark Erichson, assistant coordinator of patient tage Inn F
and public relations at Health Service. a cigarett
"Usually there is a division between them, and this "It was
is a nice way to bridge that gap. At the sign-up we had pencil in
a really good mix of students, faculty, and staff as dinner. I
well as smokers and non-smokers," Erichson added. Teague s
The sign-up was held Wednesday in the lobby of UNFO
Health Service. Smokers pledged to do their best to through tl

uites campus
m smoking from midnight Wednesday to vey condu
yesterday. American
NE WHO participated in the smokeout, in- that 36 per
on-smokers who "adopted" a smoker and day. One t
upport, were eligible for prizes from local ted they sti
d restaurants who donated to the raffle. All over a
of the people who are signing up are not the no-sm
or the prizes," said Susan Klucharich from "smokeles
ersity's patient public relations. "They want smokers h
uit for a day, and take it from there." Cleveland
I Teague, a worker in the medical records patrolled
ent at Health Service, participated in the kazoos at s
and won a ten dollar gift certificate to Cot- The Ame
Pizza. At 4_p.m., she had gone all day without million pe
:e and she said she was doing fine. this a d
s a little hard after lunch, but I just stuck a spokeswon
my mouth. I imagine it will be hardest after the number
guess I will just grab another pencil," households
aid. Gallup org
RTUNATELY, not all smokers make it The Gre<
he full 24 hours. According to a Gallup sur- year as an

interest
cted on the 1983 Smokeout, 36 percent of
smokers tried to quit for the day. Out of
cent only 8 percent made it through the full
' 11 days later, more than 4 percent repor-
ill had not smoked.
the country yesterday people were seized by
oking fever. In Florida, smokers licked
s almond" ice cream. In Denver some
ad cold turkey for lunch. Volunteers in
dressed up as smoke detectors and
the streets flashing lights and blowing
mokers.
rican Cancer Society claimed that 18.5
ole tried to quit for the day. "We consider
ecent amount," said Cancer Society
nan Joann Schellenbach. She added that
rs are based on a telephone survey of 2,096
. The final statistics are done by the
anization a few weeks later.
at American Smokeout is now in its eighth
annual nationwide event.

STUDENTS INVITED ..
LAW SCHOOL CONVERSATIONS
with
Allan Stilwagon
U-M LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS DEAN
Small Group Discussions on Preparation for Law School,
Law School Expectations and How Decisions Are Made.
Time: 9 to 12 and 1:30 to 4:30
(Hourly Discussions at 9, 10, 11 a.m. and 1:30, 2:30, 3:30 p.m.)
Place: 310 Hutchins Hall
(Law School Admissions Office)
Dates: November 20, Tuesday
December 13, Thursday
INTERESTED STUDENTS PLEASE SIGN UP FOR A
TIME AND DATE; SIGN UP LIST AVAILABLE IN
310 HUTCHINS HALL OR TELEPHONE 764-0537
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL AND
PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OF CP&P

Group

urge

(Continued from Page 1)
children would be taught to read and
write both traditional and 'phonemic
spelling. Citron said he is aware of the
expense that this implies, but feels that
the returns - in terms of time, con-
fidence, careers, and perhaps even
money - outweigh that expense.
BUT PHONEMIC spelling is meeting
a good deal of resistance, primarily
from educators and linguists, Citron
says.
"We are a literate civilization, and
the hundreds of millions of books that
are printed cannot easily be changed,"
says Prof. Roderick Fraser, assistant
director of the University's English
Language Institute.
"Educational people don't want that.
They feel a great tradition behind
that," he adds.
ANOTHER problem with phonemic
spelling is that the relationship between
some words would no longer be ap-
parent, says English Prof. Richard
Bailey.
Bailey uses the word "sign" as an
example. The "g" in "sign" serves no
phonetic function, he says, but if "sign"
is spelled without a "g," its connection
with "signify" and "signature" would
vanish.
Bailey says choice of pronunciation is
the most obvious problem. It would be
very difficult to decide "whose pronun-

s 'chaynj'
ciation becomes standard," he says.
One word that would become even
more controversial if simplified is the
word "beer" Bailey says. The English
do not pronounce the "r" in "beer," and
if an Englishman were simplifying the
spelling of "beer," he would, according
to Bailey, reasonably spell it "beea."
SURPRISINGLY, BEtSS's board of
directors includes college professors,
as well as corporate executives, jour-
nalists, teachers, and librarians.
Spelling simplification, says EMU
President John Porter is "a project
worth intellectual pursuit."
Although he says not all words could
be accepted the way they are pronoun-
ced, there is a need for research to
determine which words might be adap-
ted.
Porter says he does not believe the
country is ready yet for simpler
spelling.
RollinMarquis, city librarian in
Dearborn, says he believes spelling
reform is needed because "nobody can
spell anymore." The only solution
Marquis says would work is "if some
more phonetic method" for spelling
were to be adopted.
Toe learning Marquis says, is the
principal difficulty with our current
spelling system, and a system based on
pronunciation would be much easier to
learn.

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
University of Connecticut head
named to MSU presidency
EAST LANSING - The Michigan State University Board of Trustees
Thursday named John DiBiaggio MSU's new chief executive and the
University of Connecticut president said he expects no sweeping ad- ;,
ministrative changes.
DiBiaggio was the only candidate proposed by the board's search commit
tee and the recommendation was unanimously accepted, as expected,
following less than an hour of discussion.*
DiBiaggio will takehover for departing MSU President Cecil Mackey on
July 1, 1985 at a salary of $99,800.
"I don't usually bring in large numbers of people," DiBiaggio said at a
news conference following his appointment. He said he expects to be able todya
work with the administration team already in place at the school.
Political leaders honor King
ATLANTA - The political elite joined civil rights leaders and thousands of
ordinary citizens yesterday to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Sr., the
man who helped make freedom and justice a reality for black Americans.
For three hours they came forward to speak of King - Vice President
George Bush; former President Jimmy Carter; Georgia Gov. Joe Frank
Harris, and black leaders including Jesse Jackson and Andy Young.
In Washington, President Reagan released portions of a letter sent to
King's family.
"His sense of family and community, his spirit of charity and neigh-
borliness and, above all, his dedication to the ideals of justice and equality
leave a shining legacy for others to follow," said Reagan.
"The achievements of Dr. King and his family will live in the hearts not
only of the American people, but of all those who hunger for freedom and
equality anywhere in the world."
Lebanon requests reparations
NAQOURA, Lebanon - Lebanese negotiators yesterday demanded a
quick and complete withdrawal of Israeli troops from south Lebanon and
payment of $8 billion to $10 billion in war reparations by the Jewish state.
The Lebanese military delegation presented a long list of tough demands'
in the second round of negotiations with Israeli officers at the headquarters
of the United Nations peacekeeping force.
Israel is concerned with the security of its northern border if the troops are,
pulled back. Almost every point the Lebanese raised on the future of south
Lebanon conflicted with Israel's previously stated positions.
Conference sources said Israel rejected the Lebanese declaration and
asked instead for a detailed Lebanese plan on security arrangements'
following an Israeli withdrawal from the country it invaded two and a half
years ago.
The Lebanese agreed to continue discussions of the security issue when the
talks resume Monday in this border town, ,according to the sources who
spoke on condition they not be identified.
Chilean troops detain 1,000s
SANTIAGO, Chile - Heavily armed troops yesterday surround' . a San-
tiago slum, seized thousands of men and teenage boys and herded them into
a soccer stadium for questioning in a search for opponents of the military
regime.
Armored cars and army units equipped with combat gear lined the streets
of the shanty town of La Victoria and helicopters hovered overhead as police
launched a house-to-house roundup at dawn of most of the male population.
Catholic Church officials estimated at least 3,000 men over the age of 15
were placed on buses and trucks and taken to a nearby soccer stadium for
questioning.
It was thesecond mass detention of slum dwellers since President Augusto
Pinochet placed Chile under state of siege ten days ago to counter mounting
protests against his 11-year-old military government and a wave of terrorist
bombings.
U.S. production remains steady
WASHINGTON - The nation's industrial production remained unchanged
in October as a hoped for increase in automobiles failed to materialize, the
Federal Reserve reported yesterday.
In a separate report, the Commerce Department said business inventories
rose a moderate $3.3 billion, or 0.6 percent, in September.
The Fed also reported that during September, consumers increased their
outstanding installment credit by $4.28 billion, a smaller increase than the
$7.11 billion reported in July and $6 billion'in August.
The reports indicate a slowdown in the rapid economic recovery that was
going on during the first half of the year. The economy grew at an annual in-

Elation-adjusted rate of 10 percent in the first quarter, 7 percent in the second;
but only 2.7 percent in the third, according to preliminary figures.

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SAID sweeps elections

(Continued from Page 1)
a little more fun and exciting."
Shapiro, said the entire election was
poorly run, and explained that with only
15 membes in their organization
SPOCK never had a chance against
SAID. Of the 15 members, ten are
engineering students who aren't in-
volved in LSA elections.
A CLEAN sweep for the entire SAID
ticket left president-elect Tear hoping

year with pay
e Continuing education
opportunities

For more information
call or visit:

T. Sgt. Ron Cottick
603 Church St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
(313) 994-0522

that the two lone independents now on
LSA-SG can fit in with the rest of the
slate. She said she wants to see what the
independents have to say before she
takes command at tonight's regularly
scheduled LSA-SG council meeting.
"I know people don't like to vote
straight ticket, but all the people that I
got to run with me were all of top
quality," Tear said. "We handed out
6,000 fliers, and talked up the elections
at several of the dorm councils. You
can't beat people over their head to get
them to vote."
The new LSA-SG consists of SAID
party representatives Betsy Drilling,
Joana Luschin, Leslie Mitchel, Brenda
Bushouse, StephanieFarber, Jeffery
Trimark, Simone Wu, Andrew Wein-
stein, Karyn Palvas, Jonathan Corn,
Karem Cunningham, Lisa Kaufman,
Amy Tykinski, and independents Seth
Cohen and Lisa Henry.

A great way of life.

T HIS SPACE CONTIBUTIEDBtY THE lPUBLISHER

DON'T MISS
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Vol. XCV - No.62
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IN THE NOVEMBER 20th

Editor in Chief .................... BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors ..............CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors .... ...LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor ..................... SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors ...............,JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Nancy Dolinko, Lily Eng, Rachel Gottlieb,
Thomas Hrach, Gregory Hutton, Bruce Jackson, Sean
Jackson, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry Markon,
Eric Mattson, Molly Melby, Tracey Miller, Kery Mur-
akami, Arona Pearlstein, Lisa Powers, Charles Sewell,
Stacey Shonk, Dan Swanson, Allison Zousmer.
Magazine Editor ..........JSP KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editors .... PAULA DOHRING
JOHN LOGIE
Arts Editors ................ FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Associate Arts Editors............ BYRON L. BULL
JEFF FROOMAN
DENNIS HARVEY

Sports Editor ...............,.... MIKE McGRAW
Associate Sports Editors ...........JEFF BERGIDA
KATIE BLACK WELL
PAUL HELGREN
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Andy Arvidson, Mark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, Debbie deFrances, Joe
Devyak, Joe Ewing, Chris Gerbasi, Jim Gindin, Skip
Goodman, Jon Hartman, Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan,
Tom Keaney, Mark Kovinsky, Tim Makinen, Adam
Martin, Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade, Scott Miller,
Brad Morgan, Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Adam Ochlis,
Mike Redstone, Scott Salowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan
Warner.
Business Manager..............STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager................ LIZ CARSON
Display Manager ............... KELLIE WORLEY
Nationals Manager .K. JOEORTIZ
Sales Manager . . DEBBIE DIOGUARDI
Finance Manager ............... LINDA KAFTAN
Marketing Manager ............... KELLY SODEN
Classified Manager IC BOLOGNA
Ass't. Display Manager.........JEFFREY DOBEK
Ass't. Sales Manager .......LUI TRUSKE
Ass't. Finance Manager .......JN CAPLAN
Ass't. Classified Manager . .TERRENCE YEE
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Ellen Abrahams, Sheryl

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