100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1984 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 15, 1984
Michigan bowl picture unclear

By MIKE MCGRAW
The Rose Bowl may be quite a longshot, but a large
number of lesser bowls have got their eyes on Michigan
should it fail to win the conference title.
The official date to extend bowl bids isn't until next
Saturday, November 24 at 6:00 p.m. but the Wolverines
should have a good idea of where, if anywhere, they will
go to spend the holidays after playing Ohio State Satur-
day.
SHOULD Michigan upset the Buckeyes and finish 7-4,
Don Canham and Bo Schembechler will probably have a
great deal of invitations to sort through. Bowls that have
expressed interest in the Wolverines include the Holiday,
Aloha, Peach, Liberty and Hall of Fame.
"If Michigan wins we'd be especially interested," said
Stan Bates of the Holiday Bowl. "We've always been in-
terested in Michigan and Ohio State."
The Holiday Bowl has a great need to come up with a
good team because it would be playing against currently
undefeated and number-three ranked Brigham Young in
San Diego on December 21.
AMONG THE other bowls that are glaring hard in
Michigan's direction, the Peach Bowl in Atlanta could be
a prime candidate. The Peach's television contract with
CBS ends after this year and would like a big TV draw

from the Big Ten to get the ratings up.
Another possibility is Memphis' Liberty Bowl, which
last year took Notre Dame with a 6-5 record. Like the
Peach, this bowl will probably entertain a Big Ten team
such as Iowa (6-3-1), Purdue (6-4), Wisconsin (6-3-1),
Michigan State (6-4) or Michigan.
The Fiesta and Sun Bowls are still watching the
Wolverines, but are longshots.
ONE BOWL that is making no secret of its desire for
Michigan is the Aloha Bowl in Hawaii. Even with a loss in
Columbus, the Wolverines could be invited to play there.
"Michigan with 6-5 is like others with 8-3," said Aloha
executive vice president Mackay Yanagisawa. "We're
definitely interested in them. But I think they're going to
beat Ohio State."
The problem with an Aloha invite is that after Michigan
battled UCLA in the Bluebonnet Bowl in 1981, the Big Ten
and Pac Ten decided to bar teams of the two conferences
from playing each other in a bowl other than the Rose -
and the prime choice of the Aloha people right now is
UCLA.
As for the Cherry Bowl, don't count on it. If the
Wolverines beat OSU, they'll accept a bid from an
established bowl and if they lose, the Cherry Bowl people
would probably want to match Michigan State against a
Southeast Conference opponent.

Former Wolverine now
OSU athletic director

By PHIL NUSSEL
For 18 years Rick Bay devoted him-
self to Michigan. He aided his alma
mater by directing external activities
of the Alumni Association after many
years of work in the athletic depar-
tment. No one loved Michigan more
than Bay.
Today, he is the athletic director at
Ohio State.
IS HE A traitor? A turncoat? That
depends on how you look at it.
Bay, who took the job at Ohio State
last May after serving as athletic direc-
tor at Oregon for three years, explained

grateful for my friends.
"But once you get out into the
professional world, there are other
places too that are outstanding and
command a great deal of respect. Ohio
State is one of those places.
"PROFESSIONALLY speaking,
there's no question that I'm a Buckeye
now. I continue to have a great fondness
for the Wolverines except on occasion
when they play Ohio State."
This week will be especially tough on
Bay in that he will be receiving flak

. . _ _ ._

The 'Gator' calls it quits

DETROIT (UPI) - Gates Brown,
popular batting coach of the Detroit
Tigers, has decided not to return to ,the
club in an apparent tiff with the front
office.
"We offered him a new contract and
he declined to sign it," was all that club
Vice President and General Manager
Bill Lajoie would say of Brown's sudden
decision yesterday.
BROWN, 45, though tired of traveling
and who talked of quitting last summer,
indicated late last year he would

probably come back and asked for a
raise over his salary last season.
"There's more to it than that,"
Brown said before slamming down the
phone when called for an explanation.
"They released it. Let them release it in
detail."
The former outfielder played for 13
seasons and was a coach with the
Tigers since 1978. He would have com-
pleted 20 seasons in the major leagues
early in 1985.

THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECM ING A NUJRSE IN THE ARY
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health caref
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you re
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
Taoke rack at our
NwTaco .Salad.
The salad in the bowl you can eat.
Let us make one,just for you.
We start with all the fresh things you love in a salad, add mildly seasoned
ground beef, real cheddar cheese, and rich sour cream. Then we serve it
~« up in a bowl that's a flaky flour tortilla shell.
You'll love every bite.

why he donned the scarlet and gray
colors.
"The Ohio State job represented a
unique opportunity," Bay said Monday.
"There's just a handful of jobs when it
comes to athletic administration that
are really special. Ohio State represen-
ted a step up for me."
BAY'S ATHLETIC career at
Michigan began during his freshman
year in 1962, when he was an important
member of the wrestling team. In 1964,
he won All-America wrestling honors
and in 1965 he was named the Outstan-
ding Wrestler in the Big Ten. He never
lost a dual match in the Big Ten in three
years.
In 1970, he became Michigan's head
wrestling coach after working as an
assistant under the legendary Cliff
Keen. Bay led the Wolverines to a Big
Ten title in 1973 and to a second-place
finish in the nation the following year.
For the next six years, he worked for
the Alumni Association, and
culminated his Michigan career by
successfully directing the $2.6 million
fund raising campaign for the new
alumni center.
AFTER 18 YEARS of loyalty to the
maize and blue, Bay said he owes a
great deal to Michigan. But his loyalties
have changed now.
Bay explained: "First of all, I owe a
great deal to the University of
Michigan. There's no question about
that. I'll always begrateful for the
background I had at Ann Arbor and I'm

ACTUALLY, Bay's first "loyalty
clash" was with his mother, who
graduated from Ohio State with an
M.A. in Elizabethan Theater. When he
was at Michigan, his mother sent him
sympathy cards when Ohio State won
the fall classic. Likewise, she received
a card from him when the Wolverines
prevailed.
There are several factors that make
Bay unique as compared to most
athletic directors. First of all, he is one
of the few athletic directors to have had
this position in both the Pac Ten and the
Big Ten.
He is also not from the football or
basketball establishments, like many of
today's other athletic directors are. He
believes this has helped him.
"I THINK it's helped me in my
overall perspective," he said. "I'm
very much aware of footballhand
basketball, but on the other hand,4
having been brought up through
wrestling, which is considered a non-
revenue sport, I have a greater sen-
sitivity for some of the frustrations that
coaches in the non-revenue sports suf-
fer."
A final reason why Bay is unique is
that he is very much a patron of the ar-
ts. He credited his mother's
background in theater for this cultural;
influence. Also, he claimed he goes to
New York three or four times a year to
see various theatrical productions.
One may think Bay's situation is very
unusual. But actually, several
prominent Wolverines can easily iden-
tify with this predicament. Bo Schem-
bechler was once Woody Hayes'
assistant at Ohio State and defensive
coordinator Gary Moeller was a player
at Columbus.
Even the man who signed Bay's
degree at Michigan in 1965 could have
identified with this situation. Former
Michigan president Harlan Hatcher
was once on the Ohio State faculty.
It just goes to show, loyalties can
easily change, no matter who it is.

~a v
... now a Buckeye
from both his old and his new friends.
But he is taking it all in stride. In fact,
he believes the clash of new and old
loyalties has made his job a lot of fun.
He joked that his new job has cost him
friends.
He explained: "I've said that I don't
have any friends anymore because all
my old friends are mad at me for going
to Ohio State, and that no one at Ohio
State likes me because I went to
Michigan. So I'm caught in the gap."

GRIDDE PICKS

Why did the Yugoslavian national
team come all. the way from Europe
when they know they're going to get
slaughtered by the Michigan basketball
team? Of course, they wanted to get
their Griddes picks in.
Drazen Petrovic, the Yugo's star
guard, has already informed the Daily
that after he gets roughed up by Butch
Wade and his friends, he will turn in his
picks so that we can send him a free

small pizza from Pizza Bob's when he
wins. Do Yugoslavians eat pizza?

A

1. MICHIGAN at Ohio St. (pick score)
2. Iowa at Minnesota
3. Wisconsin at Michigan State
4. Indiana at Purdue
5. Washington at Washington St.
6. Oklahoma at Nebraska
7. Texas at TCU
8. Georgia at Auburn
9. Florida at Kentucky
10. USC at UCLA
11. Syracuse at Boston College
12. SMU at Texas Tech
13. Colgate at Rutgers
14. So. Carolina St. at Appalachian St.
15. Yale at Harvard
16. Lehigh at Lafayette
17. James Madison at Towson St.
18. Idaho at Boise St.
19. Penn St. at Notre Dame
20. DAILY LIBELS at Ohio St. Lantern

I

THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

I

PERSONALIZED
WE WILL DESIGN A CUSTOM HAIR STYLE
JUST FOR YOU...THE METHOD CUT, NOW 18.50
A cutting expert will individualize your Method Cut by
analyzing the texture of your hair, determining its growth
pattern and natural part. You can enjoy hair that behaves
because the shape is cut right into the care-free style. Your
Method Cut includes shampoo, styling and DirectivesTM conditioner.
Call 665-6111 within the next two weeks for an appointment
at these savings. Also a value...our DirectivesTM Perm with a gift

CLIP THESE MONEY SAVING COUPONS.
ITHIS COUPON GOOD FORHIS COPON GOOD FOR A THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
i BURRITO NACHOS "SACK OF TACOS"|
L off SUPREME BELLGRANDET I 6 regular I

.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan