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November 13, 1984 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-13

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Basketball
vs. Yugoslavia
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Crisler Arena

SPORTS

'ye

Michigan vs. Ohio St.
Televised by CBS
Saturday, 12 noon

14

=The Michigan Doily

Tuesday, November 13, 1984

Page 7

*

Michigan grapplers wring em dry

CCH Scorecard

CCHA Overall
W LPTW L

Paul Kobylarz, RW.
John Bjorkman, LW .......
Todd Carlile, D..........
Paul Spring, LW.........

10
10
10
10

3
3
3
2

By JON HARTMANN
It wasn't quite the Big Ten Cham-
pionships, but the Michigan wrestling
team got off to a great start Sunday in
dominating the Wolverine Open.
No official team point totals were
kept, but the Wolverines took seven of
ten weight classes in competition with
Central Michigan, Eastern, Toledo, and
Oakland. Michigan's depth allowed it to
take most of the second and third places
as well.
WOLVERINE COACH Dale Bahr
said the surprising performance of
Michigan's younger wrestlers brought
out the best in the veterans. This was
demonstrated in the 142-pound class,
where senior Rickey Moore pinned
Michigan freshman Tim Mansfield,
who was leading 6-2 at the time, for first
place.
The 126-pound competition saw
freshmen John Fisher and Jerry Norris
take first and second respectively.
Fisher was named Michigan's outstan-
ding wrestler last week in the Hall of
Fame Classic in his first meet as a
Wolverine.
Freshman Guy Russo, making the
switch up from 142 pounds, took second
in the 150-pound division to junior Tony
Latora's first.
Michigan also swept the 134-pound
class. Senior Joe McFarland, moving
up from 126 pounds where he went 48-5
last season, took first easily, while

senior Mike DerGarabedian beat out
freshman Joe White for second.
MICHIGAN'S SENIORS were not to
be outdone. In addition to the triumphs
of Moore and McFarland, seniors Scott
Rechsteiner and Kirk Trost won their
weight classes. Trost, who won the
Wolverine Open last year in the 190-
pound division, added the heavyweight
championship to his impressive list of
victories.

Rechsteiner, who qualified for the
NCAA championships two years ago,
won his second straight Wolverine Open
title at 177 pounds.
The one negative event of the meet
occured when junior Kevin Hill injured
his knee in the process of winning the
167-pound class. The extent of the in-
jury is not known but the loss of Hill for
any period of time will hurt the team.
Freshman James Dye is Michigan's
only other 167 pounder. But Don For-
chione, who weighs 158, can wrestle in
Hill's class as he showed by taking third
at 167.
SENIOR BILL ELBIN, a 177 poun-
der, filled in for Trost at 190 and took
third. Sophomore Jerome Curby, who
ran up a 69-13 record at Pioneer High
before wrestling for Michigan at 177
last year, placed fourth at 190.
Junior Steve Richards, who went 12-
13-1 last year wrestling at 158, 167, and
177 pounds, snatched second at 158.
Chris Wray, also a junior, finished
second in the 118-pound class.
Coach Bahr was pleased with the

team's performance in the tournament,
which he called "a tune-up match (for)
getting the whole team in and seeing
who can compete."
Bahr's boys will get some more prac-
tice over the next two weeks in
Dayton's Ohio Open and the Northern
Open in Madison, Wisconsin. Judging
from Sunday's performance, the
Wolverine wrestlers are getting revved
up and ready to compete in the Big Ten.

1. Michigan State ...
2. Illinois-Chicago ..
3. Lake Superior ....
4. MICHIGAN ......
Ferris State ......
Ohio State......
7. Western Michigan
Bowling Green ...
9. Miami.........

8
7
5
4
4
4
3
3
2

2
3
3
4
4
6
5
5
6

16
14
10
8
8
8
6
6
4

8
7
5

2
3
7

3
3
2
3
AVG.
4.75
5.20
7.00

6
6
5
s
sAv
104
t42
3

4 6 Goaltending
5 5 Record GP GAF
4 6 Jon Elliott ............1-3 4 19
4 6 Mark Chiamp.......... 3-2 5 26
47 Tim Makris ........... 0-1 1 7
37
3 7 -FRIDAY'S GAMES
3 7 MICHIGAN at illinois-Chicago
Lake Superior at Ferris State
Bowling Green at Western Michigan
PTS. Ohio State at Miami
Wesser n.. uma r M ai iin4un fIu

COLLEGE HOCKEY
COACHES' POLL

1. Minnesota (8-1-1) ..............98
2. Michigan State (8-2) ...........85
3. Boston University (5-2-1).......82
4. RPI (2-0) ......................50
Boston College (6-2) ...........50
6. North Dakota (6-3-1) ...........33
7. Michigan Tech (6-4) ...........32
8. Clarkston (3-0-1) ...............23
9. Illinois-Chicago (7-3) ..........22
10. Denver (4-4-2) .............21
Michigan Hockey Seats
Scoring
OGP G A Pt
Brad Jones, C..............10 10 4 1
Chris Seychel, LW ......... 10 4 7 1
Tom Stiles, LW ............ 7 2 8 1
Brad McCaughey, RW ..... 10 4 5 9
Frank Downing, RW ....... 10 3 6 9
Bruce Macnab, C/LW ...... 120 1 7 8

Western Ontario at Michigan State

SATURDAY'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Illinois-Chicago
Lake Superior at Ferris State
Bowling Green at Western Michigan
Miami at Ohio State
FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Ferris State 7, Illinois-Chicago 4
Miami 7, Lake Superior 6
Michigan State 4, MICHIGAN 1
Ohio State 3, Western Michigan 2
Clarkson 5, Bowling Green 3
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Illinois-Chicago 6, Ferris State 1
Lake Superior 6, Miami 3
Michigan State 8, MICHIGAN 2
Western Michigan 4, Ohio State 1
Clarkson 5, Bowling Green 4 (OT)

Its
4
11
10

Bahr
... up for the season

.... .... . .. ............. ........ ....... .. ...... ~ ........... ....... .......... .... :..............: ..,..,f.".. ..ยง..r.... a .t.......:,... t .... . x . t . :u.. i" ..

Trost
... takes heavyweight title

Blue L"ines1
Today's math lesson.. ..
... no goals equals no wins
WXT By CHRIS GERBASI
WVHO turned out the lights on Michigan's hockey team?
Certainly someone must have pulled a plug on the Wolverines' power play.
Perhaps a group of 25 imposters have been skating around in the Maize
and Blue the past three weekends. These players who have gone down to
defeat the last five games just can't be the same team that won four out of
their first five contests.
After scoring 31 times in those first five games, coach Red Berenson
looked like a prophet. He had predicted before the season that he would get
double the goal production from his two top lines and, lo and behold, he was
right.
Sophomore Brad Jones was scoring at a surprising rate and everyone was
chipping in. The Wolverines even rose to fifth in the national coaches' poll
and then ... well, what happened?
Somehow, on a Saturday night in Bowling Green, things started going sour
for Michigan. They scored only one goal that night and have totaled only 12
in the five losses.
Berenson has lamented the inability of his power play to put the puck in the
net. He has probably grown tired of repeating his dissatisfaction with his
penalty killers. And, to the casual observer, these are the major problems
plaguing the team.
ainst Michigan State this past weekend, the Wolverines went 0-for-13 in
two games while having a one-man advantage. On the other side of the
ledger, they allowed the Spartans three power play goals. In fact, MSU
scored more on Michigan's power play than Michigan did, as Spartan left
wing Dale Krentz tallied a shorthanded goal.
One shorthanded goal is a fluke. Two are frustrating. The four shorthan-
ded goals the Wolverines have given up this season are an embarassment
and the reasons for those goals are the underlying reasons for the five-game
slide.
Simply put, Michigan has tremendous difficulty clearing the puck out of its
own zone and maintaining control in the opponents' end of the rink.
Against the Spartans, the Wolverines were continually outskated up and
down the ice and constantly outraced to loose pucks. Berenson can count on
the fingers of one hand the number of rebound opportunities his team had in
the two games. Michigan State, on the other hand, controlled the puck vir-
tually at will, firing two or three shots every time they got down the ice.
The State series was not an aberration. These things have been happening
all season. Michigan managed to outscore teams like Miami and Ferris
State, but it wasn't because of a lack of scoring chances for the opponents.
The Wolverines were less fortunate against New Hampshire and State.
They couldn't afford to give these more talented teams second and third
chances, but they did and it cost them.
Berenson knew about all the problems facing him when he took the
coaching job. He admitted his team was not a good skating team and that
they had problems in their own end.
So what can be done at this point? A coach can't make slow skaters faster
or poor skaters better over night. But Berenson can work on, and has been
working on the power play and penalty killing. But a-three for 56 "success"
rate is little to show for his efforts.
Berenson wants a leader, a take-charge guy who can put some electricity
into the powerless play. No one has assumed that role to this point and until
someone does, Berenson will juggle his lines and look for even a semblence
of a productive combination.
Michigan isn't playing well enough to beat any team right now and if it
continues to make the same mistakes, Berenson could find himself in a deep
hole by Christmas looking up at the rest of the CCHA.
The next three weekends in particular, against improved teams Illinois-
Chicago and Lake Superior and the always-tough Ohio State, will shed some
light on whether the Wolverines are headed for another dark season.
NOW HIRING
UM students only
Part - time work
available in all
Food Service areas.
Apply in Person,. Rm. 2400, Michigan Union

Harriers
go down,
Schroeder
goes East

By STEVE HERZ
They came, they saw, and that was pretty much about it.
First-year coach Sue Parks knew it was the day of
reckoning for her squad when it battled the hilly terrain of
the University of Illinois golf course, and the the best of the
midwest Saturday at the NCAA district finals.
BUT FOR ALL their improvement and all of their effort,
the harriers still found themselves nestled in fourth place,
close enough to reflect upon the great strides made over the
year, yet also close enough to swallow the bitter taste of
defeat.
Parks knew her team had to finish at least in second place
if it had any hope of reaching the NCAA finals. Even a second
place finish had no guarantees, due to the heavy politics in-
volved in choosing what amounted to be an at large, wild-
card, berth.
As expected, the nations premier team, Wisconsin, ran
away with the meet. The race for second place was between
Michigan, Illinois, and unheralded Western Michigan. The
Wolverines never came within driving distance. of the Illini,

who easily captured second. Western also easily outdistan-
ced the Wolverines for third place.
There was a bright spot for Michigan in the otherwise
gloomy day. Junior Sue Schroeder, individually, ran her way
into the NCAA finals with a sterling fifth place finish. She will
be on her way to Penn State to race against the nation's finest
Monday. Schroeder did not let her personal triumph take
precedence over the team's misfortune.
"OF COURSE IT was somewhat disappointing. It wasn't
that we ran terrible, it's just that the other teams ran so
well," she said. Schroeder was pleased with her own
showing, saying "I was very happy of course." Yet she did
not seem overly excited by what she accomplished. "I guess
you could say I knew I had a chance and I'd be really disap-
pointed if I didn't make it."
Schroeder has one week before she faces off against the top
150 to 200 runners Cross Country has to offer. Schroeder is
neither scared nor cocky going to the NCAA's. "I'm shooting
for the top thirty," she said.

v. . ..:. ... .:.. . v. : .p Y y.v ^. }...{. ;. . :
SPORTS OF THE DAILY:

Bruce criiie

m1

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)-Earle
Bruce, Ohio State University's football
coach, lectured members of the media
about their methods yesterday, with
particular criticism reserved for
stories about athletes' problems and
preseason reports that he would be
fired.
His lecture came in response to a

tended to dismiss either Bruce, basket-
ball Coach Eldon Miller, or both men
after a new athletic direcor was hired.
Hitch was candidate for the Ohio State
athletic directorship last spring.
"I don't know about that. Do you
know that? I don't think you know what
he(Hitch) said because I talked to the
man, too," Bruce said.
BRUCE HAS coached Ohio State into
the Big Ten lead with a 6-2 record and
an overall mark of 8-2. The Buckeyes
need a victory over Michigan to clinch
the undisputed conference champion-
ship and a Rose Bowl berth.
Bruce said, "If you believe
everything you read in the newspaper,
you'll go crazy because not everything
printed in that paper is true as I know.
If it's printed, some people think it's
true."
The Ohio State coach said he plans to
call a postseason news conference after
what he called "the Roman Bates
thing" is concluded.
"I am going to talk about why players
leave football teams. I think that's im-
portant for you people to know. But
there are some things that are very
personal that can't be discussed when
things are going on," he said.
LAST WEEK Bates, 20, a junior
fullback from Memphis, Tenn., was
charged by university police with two
misdemeanors, assault and sexual im-
position, involving a 19-year-old female
non-student from suburban Wor-
thington. The case stemmed from even-
ts outside Steeb Hall, a campus dor-
mitory, late Saturday night, Nov. 3.
Bates, who is a sophomore in terms of
eligibility, told Bruce he wanted to
leave the team after he was charged.
His attorney has requested a jury trial
in Franklin County Municipal Court.

aiulatn media
Bates was a regular early in the season laughed the case out, and yet I still hear
before injuries took him out of the line- some people talk about that."
up. Bruce was referring to allegations by
Dennis Hueston, 20, a senior a 19-year-old coed who told campus
linebacker from Toledo who also was a police that she was raped repeatedly in
starter, quit after last Monday's prac- two rooms in Steeb Hall during the late
tice and returned home. The Toledo hours of Feb. 22 and the early hours of
Blade quoted Hueston, a junior in Feb. 23, 1983. A Franklin County grand
eligibility, as saying, "I was tired of jury heard testimony from Ohio State
them and their system. I haven't been football players, one basketball player
happy there in three years." and two coeds before dropping the case
SPEAKING ABOUT an incident that involving the alleged incident.

i

allegedly occurred 21 months ago,
Bruce told the media, "I think I better
put you straight right now. There never
was a rape in Steeb Hall. You under-
stand. There never was a rape in Steeb
Hall, ever. You better get that straight
because the grand jury said there
wasn't. They walked out of there and

Michigan Daily
Sports
763-0376

LSA
STUDENT GOVERNMENT'
ELECTIONS

Bruce
... having his problems
question about whether he felt any per-
sonal vindication from the knowledge
that his team is playing for the Big Ten
Conference championship Saturday
against Michigan at Ohio Stadium.
BRUCE SAID of the media and some
fans, "If you paid attention to them,
you'd go crazy. Most of them don't
know what they are talking about."
He was then asked about preseason
reports which quoted Southern
Methodist University Athletic Director
Bob Hitch as saying that Ohio State in-

MTUESDAY, NOV. 13

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