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November 08, 1984 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-08

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 8, 1984 - Page 3
Mondale retires from polities

From AP and UPI
ST. PAUL, Minn. - Walter Mondale,
standing in the rubble of a massive
Reagan landslide, said yesterday his
presidential candidacy was scarred by
Democratic infighting but he lost
because his campaign message "didn't
take."
4Solemn, but showing flashes of
humor, Mondale wished President
Reagan well at a post-mortem news
conference, but predicted Reagan will
eat several "meals of crow" during his
second term on the budget deficit and
other issues.
MONDALE ALSO said he is

"satisfied with that judgment" of selec-
ting Ferraro for his ticket, although the
campaign lost "seven or eight precious
days" during the controversy over
whether her husband, John Zaccaro,
would release his income tax returns.
During the news conference, Mondale
rejected the notion that Reagan's
overwhelming victory - 59 percent of
the popular vote and the biggest Elec-
toral College tally in history - signals a
realignment of the major parties.
He said he has no plans to run for
president "or any other elective office
again," and intends to return to his

Washington law practice as soon as he
and his wife, Joan, return from a Virgin
Islands vacation.
AFTER A LIFETIME in politics, he
told reporters, "I think the time has
come to pursue some certain economic
necessities, among other things."
Mondale, seemingly at peace with
himself, said he was confident of a
favorable verdict about his election
campaign effort.
"I did my best," said the defeated
Democratic nominee, who was buried
in an avalanche of votes that reached
historic proportions. "I worked my
heart out."

The Democratic candidate -
declaring he wants to be nothing more
than "a Democrat in America, an
American citizen that wants the best
for our nation" - met the press before
flying back to Washington for a reunion
with his running mate, Rep. Geraldine
Ferraro, whose contribution to the
ticket he praised.
Before leaving St. Paul, Mondale was
asked if he felt like the late Adlai
Stevenson, also a losing candidate, who
once said, "I am too old to cry and it
hurts too much to laugh." "There is a
little bit of that," he said.

common denominator
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Election landslid

0

(Continued from Page 1)
enthusiastic" about supporting Reagan
because "I thought (Reagan) was
stronger in foreign policy."
Many students seemed to share
Tanasijevich's sentiments about who
would win the election, but not all of
them agreed that Reagan's foreign
policy is very effective.
Hillary Straus, a junior in LSA, said she
disagrees with Reagan's approach to
diplomacy because "he blames the
Russians for everything." Straus also
had reservations about Reagan's sup-
port for issues like school prayer
because "I don't think he has any right

to bring religion into government."
LSA JUNIOR Karl Christiansen
agreed with Straus. He said that
Reagan tries to make the Soviet Union
look like "an evil source," but doesn't
consider the flip side of the coin.
"(The Russians) are just as concer-
ned about survival as we are. I think
Reagan has got to learn that we have to
cooperate, "Christiansen said.
Students seemed to support Reagan's
economic programs nearly
unanimously. And those who had reser-
vations about Reaganomics conceded
that they may actually work out for the
best. "If (Reagan's economic

e surprises
program) eventually works, it's not as
bad as it seems," Straus said.
HEATHER Huston, a freshman in
LSA, was pleased when she heard about
the Reagan landslide. "I was happy.
I'm very much for Reagan," she said.
"I pretty much agree with everything
he says."
Huston had mixed feelings about
Mondale's choice of a woman for his
running mate. She said she wasn't sure
if Rep. Geraldine Ferraro was qualified
for the number two position and that
"she ran for the wrong reasons."
Most students seemed to think that
Ferraro didn't help the ticket very
much since voters who would be most

none
impressed with having a woman on the
ticket were already going to vote for
Mondale.
Straus said she appreciated the
move, but added that "I don't think it
helped the ticket at all."
7 HAIRCUTTERS
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Student input
(Continued from Page 1).
short speeches on the code are given by
Shapiro, Prof. Martin Gold, and Eric
Schnaufer, chairman of MSA's code
committee.
Because there will be no debate bet-
ween the three panel members, specific
questions must come from the audien-
ce, Schnaufer said.
MSA has said it will not discuss the

key to forum
code with the administration unless
Shapiro first agrees that he will not ask
the regents to revoke MSA's right to
veto the rules. Shapiro, however, has
consistently refused to work under that
precondition.
The forum begins at 7:30 p.m. and
will be held in Angell Hall Auditorium
C.

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
University President Harold Shapiro, Prof. Martin Gold, and Eric
Schaufer will discuss "The Code of Nonacademic Conduct," tonight at 7:30
p.m. in Angell Hall, Auditorium C.
Film
Program in Judaic studies-compulsion, 8 p.m., Hutchins Hall, room 150.
Womens' Studies-Calling the Shots, noon, MLB 2.
MTF - Cutter's Way, 7 p.m., Silkwood, 9 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
AAFC - Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 7 and 9:15 p.m., Aud. B,
Angell.
Performances
Soundstage-Greek Night-"Resistance Free," Jeff Theuer andStuart
McCubbery on guitar, U-Club.
Musical Society - Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig, 8:30 p.m., Hill
Auditorium.
Union Arts Program - "Music at Mid-Day," noon, Pendleton Room,
Union.
Michigan Union Student Program-Music at Midday Series, Richard
Morgan, saxophone, Elizabeth Steen, piano, 12:15 p.m., Pendleton Room,
Union.
Office of Major Events - Patty Donohue and The Waitresses, 8 p.m.,
Union Ballroom.
Speakers
English-Jeffery Barnouw, "Appropriateness and Appropriation in Inter-
pretation," 7:30p.m., E Conference Room, Rackam.
Center for Research on Economic Development - Patrick Thomas,
Migration, Agriculture, and Livestock," 12:40 p.m., 3400 Lorch Hall, CRED
conference room.
English Language and Lit. - Normand Berlin, Beckett in Context leture
series, 4 p.m., W Conference Room, Rackham.
Center for Japanese Studies - Nan Hodges, "Dr. Benajah Ticknor, Wit-
ness to America's First Attempt to Open Japan, July, 1846," noon, Lane Hall
Commons.
Chemistry - Samuel Danishefsky, "Applications of the Hetero Diels-
Aider Reaction to Organic Synthesis," 3:30 p.m., 1210 Chemistry Bldg.
Entrepreneur and Innovator Series - William Weiss, "Business,
Education and Government: A Partnership to Create Eonomic Oppor-
tunity", 2 p.m., MLB 4.
Meetings
Anxiety Disorders Support Group - 7:30 p.m., Children's Psych Hospital,
3rd floor conference room.
Medical Center Bible Study -12:30 p.m., Chapel, 8th floor Main Hospital.
Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship - noon, 220 E. Engineering Bldg.
Agape Compus Christian Fellowship - 6:30 p.m., South Quad Minority
Lounge.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship -7 p.m., League.
Miscellaneous
Student Wood and Craft Shop - Advanced power tool safety class, 6 p.m.,
537 SAB.
Scottish Country Dancers - Beginners 7 p.m.; Intermediates 8 p.m.,
Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood.
Museum of Art - Art Break, "The Influence of Joan Miro," 12:10 p.m.,
Museum.
School of Business Ad. - "Advanced New Product Management,"
"Management of Managers," "Management II: A Mid Management
Development Program," "Effective Use of Computer Resources," "Finan-
cial Analysis, Planning, Control," "How to Improve Classroom Training
Techniques," "Basic Management for the Newly Appointed Manager,"
"Team Development for Team Effectiveness." For information, call 763-
1000.
Computing Center-Chalk Talk, "Using SORT for Sorting and Merging,"
12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS; Lab, "The Zenith z-150 as an MTS Terminal," 1:30
p.m. and 3:30 p.m., NUBS, z-150 room.
ACS/Student Affiliate - Tutoring in any 100 or 200 level chemistry course,
6 p.m., 3207 Chemistry Bldg.
Ark - Greg Brown, 8 p.m., 637 S. Main.
League - International Night, Germany, 5-7:15 p.m., Cafeteria.
Mim.1*Lnum Fwncatinn Cnter - "Intro to the Macintosh Personal

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