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November 07, 1984 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.4

Hockey vs. Michigan State
Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS

Women's swimming
vs. Pittsburgh
Friday, 6:00 p.m.
Matt Mann Pool

.. ........

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, November 7, 1984

Page 10

I%

Frieder lands third
pre-season recruit
By JOE EWING

'M'DEFENDER LEAVES TROUBLES IN D US T
Cochran: a crack back

Michigan basketball coach Bill
Frieder added another name to his
list of recruits for next year when
Loy Baught, a forward out of East
Kentwood, made a verbal commit-
ment to the Wolverines on Monday.
The 6-9, 210-pound Baught was the
third high school senior to announce
his intentions to come to Michigan
before the official November 14
signing date. The others were J.P.
Oosterbaan, a 6-10 center/forward
out of Kalamazoo, and Billy Butts, a
6-2 guard from Muncie, Ind.
Last year as a junior at East Ken-
twood High School, Baught averaged
24 points, 12 rebounds and six
blocked shots per game while

playing center. He plans to switch to
forward when he comes to Michigan.
"I played center in high school, but.
I'll be playing forward in college."
He was also a Street and Smith's
pre-season All-America pick this
year.
Baught cited numerous factors
helping him to make his decision.
"It was mainly because it was close
to home," he said from his home last
night. "There were really a lot of
reasons. My family liked Michigan.
I liked it and the players; it's the
class place."
He also mentioned that the
coaching staff was another reason
that figured in his choice.

THE FFIE OF MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS
Patty Donahue and
Thie WUaitresses

With
Mar
Nove:
Tickets availabl
and other Ticke

p'.
Dom
cet Office,

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
Three games into his freshman
season (1982), Brad Cochran quit on Bo
Schembechler and Michigan football. If
there is one kind of individual that
Schembechler will not tolerate, it is a
quitter.
"By far, that was the worst period of
my life," said Cochran, now a junior,
majoring in communications.
DESPITE WINNING a starting
position in the Wolverine defensive
backfield as a mere freshman, the
pressures of playing football and doing
school work became too much.
"The pressure to win at this level is a
lot greater than what people think,"
said Cochran yesterday. Cochran said
that the pressures of big-time college
football still bother him, but that today,
at 21, he knows how to handle them bet-
ter.
When Cochran left Michigan, he went
to the University of Colorado, an excur-
sion that lasted only a few weeks.
Returning to his home in Royal Oak, he
worked out in his high school gym at
Brother Rice and settled down.
TESTS TAKEN in Colorado revealed
that a hereditary chemical imbalance
had been the cause of Cochran's
troubles. The stress placed on the
young Cochran made the physical im-
balance manifest itself. Medication was
prescribed and worked. Today Cochran
is off the medication.
Surprisingly to Cochran, in late June
of '83, Lloyd Carr called and invited
him back to the team. Carr is
Michigan's defensive backfield coach.
Cochran accepted the second chance
and has been a terrorizing factor in the
Wolverine defense for the last two
seasons.
"Give Cochran credit," said Schem-
bechler last spring. "When he came
back, he was the thirteenth and last
defensive back (on the depth chart). He
had to earn that starting position."
COCHRAN STARTED all 12 games a
year ago and was second on the team in
tackles (64) behind linebacker Mike
Mallory. Cochran finished the season in
a flourish, picking off two passes again-
st Ohio State and one in the Sugar Bowl
against Auburn. He also recovered a
fumble in Michigan's, 9-7 Sugar Bowl

loss. In all, he led the Wolverines with
five interceptions.
"When you look at Brad in com-
parison with all the great defensive
backs that have played at Michigan,
you see that he doesn't have any
weaknesses," said Carr. "He can
totally do it all."
According to Carr, Cochran is 6-4, 208
pounds and runs the 40-yard dash in 4.5
seconds. "He has such tremendous size
for a defensive back. Physically, he's a
great talent," said Carr.
THE PHYSICAL assets as well as his
impressive '83 campaign were not lost
on the pre-season pollsters, many of
whom tabbed Cochran a likely '84 All-
American.
"He's played well, he's had a good
year," said Schembechler, who has not
had many positive comments for his
players during this 5-4 season.
Cochran is ahead of his '83 pace with
58 tackles in nine games this season. He
also leads the team with four intercep-
tions.
HIS BEST game of the season came
two weeks ago against Illinois. He
made 12 tackles (10 unassisted) and
returned an interception 49 yards as
Michigan upset the Illini, 26-18.
"I think it was (my best game) per-
sonally, since I've been at Michigan,"
said Cochran. "Losing to them last year
was inspiration enough. And we weren't
treated too well down there by the
fans."~
Oddly, his best game was im-
mediately followed by his "most
frustrating" game, last Saturday's, 31-
29 loss at Purdue.
"I COULDN'T tell you what went
wrong," said Cochran searching for an
explanation. "I felt so helpless. They
just went up and down the field on us at
will. For that to happen I don't under-
stand. Everyone wanted to win, we
knew it was a big game. I've never been
more frustrated before."
Michigan has two big games
remaining on its schedule, including the
slugfest in Columbus. Cochran agreed
that wins over the Gophers of Min-
nesota and the Buckeyes would salvage
the season and might propel Michigan
to a bowl game.

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Brad Cochran during Michigan's 26-18 victory over Illinois. It was the cor-
nerback's best game as a Wolverine as he made 12 tackles and returned an

Special Guest
y's Birthday
mnber 8, 8pn
inUnion Bal
e at the Unlion Tick
t World outlets.

interception 49 yards.
Cochran is e.xperiencing a boyhood
dream by playing for the Wolverines,
especially in the big games.
"I LIVED and died with Michigan
while I was growing up. I used to turn
off the volume of the T.V. and turn on
Bob Ufer (the legendary voice of the
Wolverines who died in 1981)." He ad-
mits that as he grew up he used to
visualize Ufer announcing his name
while he was on the field.
Cochran no longer visualizes about
playing for Michigan, he now visualizes

making the big play in the crucia4
situation. "You never really stop
(thinking about football during the
season)," said Cochran. "I'm always
putting myself in game situations. Fi'm
always thinking about it."
But for all his prowess on the field,
there is a tinge of regret in Cochran's
voice when he talks about his total
devotion to football as a collegian.
"That's about all I am around here."
True, Cochran may not be as well-
rounded off the field as he would likel
but once on it, he does it all.

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:

USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS Hernandez

takes MVP honors

\ 6

NEW YORK (AP)-Relief ace Willie
Hernandez of the world champion
Detroit Tigers was named the Most
Valuable Player in the American
League yesterday, completing a sweep
of the league's major postseason awar-
ds.
Hernandez, who saved 32 games in 33
opportunities and posted a 9-3 record
with a 1.92 earned run average, won the
A.L. Cy Young Award last week.
Eastern nips spikers
What do you get when you cross a
fired-up Eastern Michigan women's
volleyball team with a complacent
Michigan squad? A Huron triumph over
a more skilled Wolverine team.
Eastern Michigan (now 10-17) took
the wind out of Michigan's season last
night in the CCRB, nipping the

Wolverines three games to two.
DOWN 10-5 EMU rallied to take the
first game, 15-12, behind the spirited
play of the entire Huron squad. The
Hurons then unleashed themselves
from a skimpy 10-9 advantage in game
two to grab a 15-11 win, causing the
Wolverines (now 10-16 overall) to
cringe in frustration.
Game three saw a Michigan spurt
that transformed a 6-3 Huron lead into a
15-8 Michigan crucification. The poor
blocking the Wolverines displayed in
the first two games disappeared.
The newly-found blocking pumped
new life into the veins of Michigan and
looks of frustration became looks of
determination as it took game four,15-
10. Michigan never looked back after
Andrea Williams smothered a slam into
the face of a Huron defender.

Permlanent Cetes pe
ens PLt~~,efs
Ho prly8 C~os oover 10lctos
* Trasfer -t +1 ,.

(100

Michigan volleyball coach Barb Can-
ning surmised the Wolverine effort,
"The same motivational problems and
the same mistakes that have hauntedE
us all year plagued us again. The EMU
players didn't give up. Our team makes
mistakes when getting points is crucial.
We get down on ourselves."
- ANDREW J. ARVIDSON
GRIDDE PICKS
The Daily's ballot box was flowing
over yesterday as residents from as fa4
away as Ypsilanti waited in hour long
lines to cast their votes in the weekly
Griddes contest. The Daily's
psychoanalyst explained the surge In
interest by saying "people just want to
vote around this time.".
It's not too late to cast your votes, just
drop by the Daily and you could win
that free small, one item pizza from
Pizza Bob's.
1. Minnesota at MICHIGAN (pick score)
2. Ohio State at Northwestern
3. Illinois at Indiana
4. Michigan St. at Iowa
5. Purdue at Wisconsin
6. Washington at So. California
7. Houston at Texas
8. Nebraska at Kansas
9. Florida St. at So. Carolina
10. Maryland at Miami, Fla.
11. Georgia at Florida
12. Army at Boston College
13. LSU at Alabama
14. SMU at Rice 6
15. TCU at Texas Tech
16. Missouri at Oklahoma St.
17. Wake Forest at Duke
18. Stanford at Arizona
19. William and Mary at Colgate
20. Minnesota Golden Showers at Daily
Libels

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