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November 06, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-06

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Page 5
Party reviews Reagan promises

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON-By his own party's count, President
Reagan made 117 campaign promises and kept more than 100
during his first year in office.
This time around he has hardly made any, giving voters
few clues to what he will do if he wins re-election.
FOR MONTHS Reagan's only campaign pledge was to
simplify the federal income tax system, and he has yet to tell
anyone how he would do that.
Then, during a brief slump in the poll just after the first
presidential debate, Reagan promised never to cut Social
Security benefits for those not getting them or for future
retirees.
The Republican National Committee counted 147 promises,
and one year after Reagan's inauguration listed only three,
including the balanced-budget pledge, that he had not kept.
It claimed he had fulfilled 104 and had made progress toward
fulfilling 40 more.
CAMPAIGNING IN1984, Reagan makes promises of a dif-
ferent kind. He promises a continued "Second American
Revolution," a "great national renew" and an "opportunity
society."
Reagan has said, in increasingly narrow terms, that he
won't raise taxes, which leaves only economic growth and
spending cuts to reduce the giant deficits that have ac-
cumulated during his presidency.
But except for occasional references to the cuts Congress
wouldn't give him in his first term and a commission's
proposal to make government more efficient, Reagan has not
said what programs he would cut.
He has campaigned for the tools he says he needs to finish
the job of trimming the size of federal government: a line

item veto empowering him to clip programs he doesn't like
out of multibillion-dollar appropriations bills and a balanced-
budget amendment to the Constitution.
THE OBJECT of conservative anger on both those issues is
the U.S. Supreme Court, and Reagan could have a profound
effect on its makeup in a second term. Five of the nine
justices are 75 years old or older and all have experienced
some health problems in recent years.
Reagan's promise of "a complete overhaul of our tax
system" has been compromised by simultaneous proposals
to give tax breaks to favored groups ranging from parents
with children in private schools to businesses involved in
high-technology research.
Although any tax simplification plan could be expected to
cut away many of the exemptions, deductions, credits, and
deferrals that complicate the existing system, Reagan
already has promised to preserve the deduction for home
mortgage interest payments.
In their final day of campaigning, Reagan told voters that
peace and arms control would be the main goals of a second
term and Mondale asked voters to make history by giving
him an upset and electing Geraldine Ferraro the first woman
vice president.
"We're gonna win" Mondale claimed, with vice presiden-
tial nominee Geraldine Ferraro virtually the only voice
seconding his own. A political prisoner, Ferraro was in
the final hours of her campaign, as well, racing from Ohio to
Pennsylvania to New Jersey to New York with her message:
"Stand up and fight for Fritz Mondale."
A National Public Radio/Louis Harris Poll Broadcast
yesterday showed Mondale has closed to within 11 points of
Reagan-a gap that stood at 19 points in the poll last week. It
showed Mondale gaining strength in the East, particularly.

Associated Press"
President and Mrs. Reagan wave to the thousands of well-wishers and supporters on hand for Reagan's last Los
Angeles rally yesterday at Pierce College in Woodland Hills, Calif.
Profs chart rates Reaganomics

(Continued from Page 1)
flation down. And there's stability in
this country because Reagan's taking
the problems Carter created and tur-
ning them around."
r Justin Louenberger, a friend of
Geiringer's also from Port Washington,
t added, "Carter was a smart man, but a
poor president." He thinks "Reagan
fantasizes about how the country can
be," although "he has done a lot for the
economy."
According to Gramlich, increase in
government borrowing from credit
' markets contributes to higher interest
rates. These rates have boosted the
value of the dollar. Relative to foreign
currency, the dollar value is superior
"While this is good for American
travelers abroad, for example, or for
Americans who like to buy foreign
products, the costs for industry are

high." There is a flood of investment in-
to the United States by foreign in-
vestors, he said, and this makes exports
and goods that compete with imports
non-competitive and reduces their
sales.
TERRY WARE, from the Republican
party office in Lansing Headquarters,
pointed out however that other in-
dicators reveal a positive economic
climate. "The downfall in home pur-
chases has been turned around from 1.3
million units in 1981 to 2.8 million units
in 1984 and inflation is down and has
given new strength to purchasing
power.''
Gramlich attributed the lowering of
inflation to Reaganomics. He pointed
out that normal stimulation of the
economy through tax incentives for in-
vestment, across-the-board cuts in con-

sumption taxes, and a decline unem-
ployment, inflation goes up.
However, at the end of his term,
Reagan has kept unemployment down
while creating six million new jobs in
the last 21 months. Overall, the rate of
growth has held steady to that of the
Carter administration, Gramlich said.
Ware pointed out that increases in
auto sales and the lowering of the prime
rate, the rate at which government len-
ds money to businesses, are positive
signs of the economic growth.
A University computer science
major, Wiltse Carpenter, feels differen-
tly about the economy and is supporting
candidate Walter Mondale. "I'm voting
for the lesser of two evils," he said, "I
don't like supply-side economics or the
idea that government is operating on
borrowed money."

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r.-------------------------------------------------

Students for Simon travel to Ill.
(Continued from Page 1)

because the Simon campaign is built on
volunteers, whereas the Percy cam-
paign is built on money."
The student assistance "says to Paul
that there's something out there he
should really listen to," she said.
Crossing state boundries "shows that
people care about the nation as a whole,
POLICE
NOTES
* A
Woman assaulted
A 25-year-old Ann Arbor woman was
assaulted at 3:15 a.m. Saturday while
walking alone in the 3800 block of
Packard, according to Ann Arbor
Police Sgt. Jan Suomala.
Two male subjects approached the
woman and demanded that she give
them a gold chain she was wearing,
Suomola said. When the woman
refused, the subjects pushed her to the
ground, Suomala said.
The victim screamed, fought off the
attackers without surrendering the
chain, and fled with minor injuries,
SSuomala said.
Taco Bell robbed
An employee of Taco Bell handed
over a small amount of cash to an ar-
med robber Sunday night. The man,
who threatened the employee with a
handgun, entered the restaurant about
. 10 p.m. and fled after receiving the
j money.
-Molly Melby

and aren't limited to their own states,"
she added.
KARP, who helped form the group
because he was "irritated at the latent
support for Israel, but the student un-
willingness to do anything about it,"
said "350 students from all over the
Midwest could certainly make a great
impact."
Gil Preuss, the group's treasurer,
said that "at minimum, we should get
25-40 votes per/person."

IMPAC members pointed to a 1982
precedent where the United States Rep.
Paul Finley, who was considered
another strong opponent of Israel, was
defeated by 1400 votes by Dick Durbin,
partly because of student volunteers
from the University of Illinois.
"Representative Durbin has told me
the students had a high impact on
bringing out the vote, and may have ac-
tually influenced the results," said Bill
Durbin, Field Coordinator for Durbin's
re-election.

The Israel
University Center
515 Park Avenue
2nd Floor
New York, NY 10022.
1 want to find great
study abroad in
Israel. Please send me
more information.
F

Last Name First Name
Current school
School Address . city State Zip
School Phone Home Phone
Major Graduation Date

i I

THE FUTURE IS IN
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
A representative will be on campus
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1984
to discuss
GRADUATE STUDY
THUNDERBIRD
AMERICAN GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
GLENDALE, ARIZONA 85306
Interviews may be scheduled at
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.

UofMIFB

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QQD.

-. a ", Z, "

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f f s
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r~ .

7

Ross
University
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of study leading to qualified degrees in Med-
icine and Veterinary Medicine. The Schoots
are located on the beautitut Caribbean Is-
lands of Dominica and St.Kilts. AlIcourses
are taught in Engish by outstanding tac-
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semesters.
TRANSFER APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED
FOR CLINICAL CLERKSHIIPS
FROM QUALIFIED STUDENTS
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
American Medical School curriculum.
We have affiliations and working agree-
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and internship in U.S. Hospitals. We have
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PWhat Tom Wl dorthe
orl inal astronauts Steve Levy
has done for HACKERS."
Meet Peter Deutsch, who was still in
short pants when he stumbled on the
TX-0 at MIT; Bill Gosper, the Horowitz
of computer keyboards and guru of the
Hacker Ethic; Richard Greenblatt, who
went into night phase so often that he
zorched his academic career; Steve
(Slug) Russell, who hacked the first Y a
video game and never made a dime from
it; Lee Felsenstein, who brought the
"junkyard approach" to computers;
Efrnm I inin whn Invin machines hit __

YO)URS.
Help U of M defeat Ohio State in the
Annual Blood Donor Battle.
It's time for friends of Michigan to lie down and fight.
Time to get out there and beat Ohio State by giving
more blood to the Red Cross than they do. Join the
Michigan team at your nearest Red Cross Donor Center
in Washtenaw, Wayne, Oakland, Macomb or St. Clair
counties from November 5 through 16. Help Michigan
win the Blood Donor Trophy.
MONDAY, NOV. 5 - BURSLEY - 3 to 9 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOV. 6 - COUZENS - 1 to 7 p.m.
wEnMc@n AV UnV 7- " ___ MADVADEI V - 4 t 7n . .m

I

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