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November 06, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 3

India's police
allow mobs to
pummel press

Council postpones
parking ticket vote

From AP and UPI
NEW DELHI - Three photographers
working for foreign news organizations
iwere attacked and beaten by a mob
yesterday as about 60 policemen wat-
ched and did nothing, the
photographers and witnesses said.
One of the photographers, Dieter
Ludwig of the Paris-based Sipa Press
photo agency, said a police inspector
pushed him back into the mob of about
30 men after he had broken free and
pleaded for help.
THE OTHER two photographers,
Alon Reimiger and Dilip Metha, both on
contract to Time magazine, were badly
beaten but escaped without "any
serious injuries," Time correspondent
Dean Brelis said.
Hundreds of foreign journalists
descended on India to cover Gandhi's
cremation and the nation's most
widespread communal violence since
independence in 1947.
Witnesses said the photographers
were standing outside a police station
serving as a makeshift morgue in the
old quarter of the capital when they
were attacked about 10 feet from where
some 60 police were sitting.

By CARRIE LEVINE
In an effort to gain more community
input, the Ann Arbor City Council last
night tabled discussion on whether to
change the city's parking ticket
policies.
The changes proposed by the
Michigan Democratic Caucus would
lower parking fines from $3 to $2 if paid
within two days and make it easier for
parking violators to pay.
THE CAUCUS introduced an amen-
dment to a city ordinance Oct.
1 as an alternative to the current
policies, which they believed harassed
people into paying on time.

"(Caucus members) decided that we
didn't have to harass people to get them
to pay their parking tickets. They wan-
ted the policy to be more reasonable
and humane," said councilwoman
Kathy Edgren.
In addition to lowering the fine for
prompt payment, the proposed alter-
native calls for the installment of
collection boxes around the city to
facilitate payment of the parking
tickets and placing locks on the wheels
of cars parked in expired meters in-
stead of towing them away.
No future date for discussion of the
proposed changes has been set.

"THE UNIFORMED police, who
outnumbered the attackers by more
than two-to-one, got up from where they
were sitting and walked away," Ludwig
said.
The assault was the latest in a series
of incidents that foreign reporters
believe is aimed at harassing them and
restricting news about the violence.
Gandhi's assassination last Wed-
nesday by two Sikh members of her
security force unleashed a wave of
violence in northern India that left an
estimated 1,100 people dead-about half
of them in New Delhi.
The worst of the deadly anti-Sikh
reprisals for Prime Minister Gandhi's
assassination subsided over the
weekend, but at least three people were
reported killed yesterday in New
Delhi-two Sikhs burned to death, and
one person shot dead by snipers said to
be Sikhs.
Yesterday, the ashes of the slain
prime minister were put into 40 urns
and placed aboard trains and air force
planes for a tour of India's 22 states and
a lastfarewell from India's 720 million
people. The ashes will be scattered by
aircraft Sunday over the Himalayas.

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Students put vote m billfold

Merill Wilson (top) tells spectators on the Diag yesterday not to support the
current system of government by not voting in the presidential election. The
member of the Communist Revolutionary Party interrupted speakers Kathy
Shulman (left) and Walter Olson in yesterday's mock presidential debate in
the Kuenzel Room of the Union.
Interruption spikes debate

(Continued from Page 1)
Hans Yentz, an LSA junior, said he
ill vote for Mondale because he offers
a sincere attempt to slow the arms race
to a "more sane pace" and also because
the Democrats promise to preserve
student loans.
Yentz said he looks beyond the fact
that Mondale has pledged to raise
taxes, saying the revenue from taxes
"will ultimately benefit us."
LSA JUNIOR Adam Kasha, said he'll
vote for Mondale because of his stands
on two specific issues: defense spen-
iung and the environment.
"Too much money and mental

resources are going to the military
Brilliant scientists' talents could be bet-
ter used in other ways to benefit
society," he said.
Kasha added that the nation's en-
vironment will be permanently
damaged if Reagan continues to im-
plement his policies.
But despite Kasha and Yentz's
specific reasons for supporting the
Democratic ticket, Markus said voting
trends show a disintegration of the
cleavage between the two parties
"because there isn't much controversy
about what the government's role in
society should be."

(Continued from Page 1)
But (her) words seemed lost with the
students, who were more startled by
the interruption than by what she actually
said.
"I THINK THE people here have
already made up their minds," said
Melissa Long, a graduate student in
linguistics. Long, like most of the other
students, wore a button advertising her
party.
Juana Scott, an LSA junior, said she
firmly supports Mondale, but came
because she thought perhaps a
"younger person could argue the issue
better than Reagan, since he has
trouble remembering what the issues
are."
Kathy Shulman, director of Youths
for Democratic Action, and Walter
Olson, contributing editor for the
National Review, fielded questions

from a panel of student journalists and
organizatgion leaders.
THEY SPARRED OVER issues such
as prayers in public schools. Shulman
contended that "voluntary" school
prayer does force children to pray.
"Schoolchildren have plenty of time
to pray if they want to. You can pray
during recess, you can pray before
school. The conservative's ultimate
goal is to make sure we're all being
good Christians," she told the crowd.
On another election issue, Olson said
comparable wage is unworkable
because it "attempts to reduce
everything to a number."
And Shulman attacked Reagan's
choice of conservative Supreme Court
justices who ignore women's issues.
"All men would be better than Sandra
Day O'Connor," she said.

*

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Gimme an

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Gimme an .I ,L*9.Y
Give the MICHIGAN DAILY
that old college try.
CALL 764.0558 to order your subscription

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Wind Ensemble and Chamber Winds under the direction of Robert
Reynolds and Larry Rachleff perform the Strauss finale from "Symphony
for Wind Instruments" tonight at 8 p.m. in Rackham Auditorium.
Film
AAFC-The Deer Hunter, 7:30 p.m., MLB 4.
Speakers
American Society of Photogrammetry-Barbera Burns, "Radar Remote
Sensing of Venus", noon, 1036 Dana Building.
Guild House-Pringle Smith, "Conversations on How Women Grow and
Change", noon, 802 Monroe.
Rudolf Steiner Institute of the Great Lakes Area-"Introductions to
Rudolf Steiner's Thought", 8-10 p.m., 1923 Geddes Avenue.
College of Engineering-K. Eguchi, "A Logical Simulation Technique for
Gate/Transistor Circuits With Precise Delay Estimation", 10:30 a.m., 1084
East Engineering Building.
Center for Chinese Studies-Brown Bag Lunch Series, "Chinese Studies of
the History of Sino-American Diplomatic Relationship", noon, Lane Hall
Commons.
College of Engineering-Eric Wagner, "Hierarchy of Powerful
Programming Languages with Simple Syntax and Semantics, 4 p.m., 2031
East Engineering Building.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club-7-11 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Academic Alcoholics-1:30 p.m., Alano Club.
Lesbian Network-7:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
His House Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann.
Center for Eating Disorders-Support Groups, 7:30 p.m., 2002 Hogback,
Suite 13.
Turner Geriatric Clinic-Newcomer's group for senior citizens, 1-3 p.m.
Miscellaneous
Center for Continuing Education of Women - "Job Hunt Club", noon. 350
South Thayer.
University of Michigan Arts Chorale - Rehearsal, 3 p.m., Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
SWomen's Volleyball-Michgan vs. Eastern Michigan University, 7 p.m.,
"CCRB.
Museum of Art-Art Break, "The Influences of Joan Miro", 12:10, p.m.,
Museum of Art.
Student Organization Development Center-Workshop, "Getting Your
Act Together: Goal Setting and Action Planning", 4 & 7 p.m.
Computing Center-Chalk Talk, "File Manipulation with Combine", 12:10
p.m., 1011 NUBS.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

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More people
have survived
cancer than
now live in
the City of
Los Angeles.
We are winning.
Please

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WHEN: Sunday, November 11th
WHERE: Sheraton University Inn
3200 Boardwalk, Ann Arbor
TIME: 1:30tp.m.
HOW: By reservation only. Call Robert or Shirley at 769-8700.

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ABOUT THE LECTURER
Sherwin Goldstein, a graduate of the University of Michigan, is Senior Vice President of
Prudential-Bache Securities. Goldstein, who now resides in the Chicago area, authors the
"Investors Forum" column for two Chicago area newspapers. He also broadcasts the stock market
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