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November 01, 1984 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-01

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 1, 1984
Jones finds success on Red's ice

By MIKE REDSTONE
Once upon a time, a five-year-old boy
passed the Fraser Ice Arena and asked
his father if they could go in. They did,
and the boy saw a hockey game. The
youngster liked what he saw and within
a week he was on the ice in his first pair
of skates.
Brad Jones has been playing hockey
ever since.
JONES, A sophomore who now stan-
ds 6-1 and weighs 190 pounds, has
blossomed into a dangerous goal scorer
and currently leads the Wolverines with
six goals in six games, including a hat
trick earlier in the season against;
Ferris State.
In his twelve years of organized
hockey before coming to Michigan,
Jones played for teams in both Canada
and the United States.
As a junior in high school, the Sterling
Heights native played for a Michigan
National Hockey League team which
placed second in the state. The
following season Jones played, in
Canada where he was recruited by
former Wolverine assistant coach Mike
Turner.
" I WAS playing in Canada and living
with a family up there. I thought if I
played in Canada it would improve my
chances of being recruited," said
Jones. "When Turner talked to me I
was still looking at Western and'
Chicago Circle (Illinois-Chicago)."
But Jones picked Michigan, and with
the way his offensive skills have
developed this year under new coach
Red Berenson, the high-scoring center
is glad he did.
"Coming to Michigan was the best

Credits Berenson 's wide open
offense for scoring barrage

decision I've made in my career," said
Jones, who had eight goals and 26
assists to finish third among Michigan
scorers last year. "I chose Michigan
because they had a rich tradition in
hockey and I thought I could step right
in and play.
"I THOUGHT I had a good year last
year but (former head coach John)
Giordano stifled us offensively. We
were too confined up on the forward
line. This year I'm trying to contribute
a whole lot more and with our new of-

fensive style I think I can."
This new offensive style was brought
to Ann Arbor this year by Berenson, a
one-time center himself in both the
NHL and Maize and Blue. The first-
year coach believes Jones' raw talent
could lead him to an NHL career, but
Berenson is cautious about making any
predictions.
"If he continues to improve he may
have a chance to play in the pros, but
right now I want him to play the role of
being one of our leading forwards,"
said Berenson. "He has the ability to be
a strong two-way player, but like most
college players, he has a lot to learn
about playing defense."
JONES ALSO attributes his early
success this year to Berenson's arrival.
"Coach Berenson knows what he's
talking about. He knows the little things
that no other coach knows about
because he played and coached in the
NHL."
A key preseason move for Berenson
was putting Jones on a line with junior
Tom Stiles. The two played together on
the same line for several games at the
end of last year's campaign and ap-
peared to click. When Berenson found
himself short of left wings early this
season, he converted Stiles to that
position and teamed him with Jones
and freshman Brad McCaughey.
THE LINE has responded well,
scoring nine goals and 11 assists in the

first six games while the team has
compiled a 4-2 record.
"The last four weekends last year I
switched to left wing with Jones at cen-
ter," said Stiles, who leads the team
with seven assists. "We started clicking
right away. This year we're looking for
each other. He's the smartest center
I've ever played with. He's not selfish
and he has good speed coming down the
ice."
"I just try to put players together that
I think will compliment each other,"
said Berenson while explaining how the
line was formed. "Jones, I feel, is an
up-and-coming, strong and talented
player. Stiles and McCaughey are also
solid performers.
JONES CAN only be optimistic about
a future pro career after his fast start
this season and several accomplish-
ments last summer.
In addition to being drafted in the
eighth round by the Winnipeg Jets of
the NHL, Jones survived cuts in Lake
Placid to make the U.S. National Junior
Team. The team is composed of the 20
best junior players in the country.
"I went into Lake Placid with a con-
fident attitude and played well," said
Jones who is enrolled in the school of
education. "Getting drafted by the NHL
and making the Junior National Team
were both big thrills."
If Jones can keep his confidence up
and play well in his remaining years at
Michigan, he may be able to achieve his
career goal of playing in the NHL. Who
knows, maybe he will thrill some five-
year-old boy enough so that he will ask
his dad for a pair of skates.

I

4

4

Jones
... leading goal scorer

Daily Photo by MATI PETRIE
Sophomore Brad Jones controls the puck in Michigan's 8-6 win over Ferris
State in early season action. His six goals are tops for the Wolverines this
season.

Rodneys finish in top
half of NY Marathon

By DEBRA deFRANCES
After missing three days of
classes, and enduring almost four
hours of painful running, senior Jeff
Rodney said that the New York City
Marathon was well worth the hours
he spent training.
Amidst 18,000 starters in Sunday's
race, Jeff Rodney and his father Bud,
a 1960 graduate of Michigan, both
finished in the top half of the field.
After predicting he would run a 3:45
hour marathon, for his first ever, the
younger Rodney finished in 3:44:51
hours.
"SEE, I was pretty close to what I
said I'd do. I think I could've done it
in 3:30 but it was. so hot," he said.
The streets of New York City were

hot and humid Sunday morning. The
94 percent humidity forced 1500 run-
ners to drop out of the event and
caused problems for many of the top
finishers.
"I lost ten seconds every time I
stopped for water, and that was
every water stop," Jeff said.
ONE OF the things that inspired
Rodney to keep running, was the
great amount of support from
Michigan fans. "The first 20 miles I
looked for and heard a lot of 'M-Go
blues" Rodney, who wore a
Michigan t-shirt said. .
The father and son duo did not see
each other during the course of the
race, as Bud Rodney finished in 4:19.
Jeff Rodney completed the 26.2 mile
event in the top 20 percent at 3513.

I

_ _ _
_

FOR YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY
AND THE PROTECTION Of YOUR RIGHTS
WHILE A STUDENT AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ELECT
GEORGE WAHR SALLADE
(Democrat)
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY OF WASHTENAW COUNTY

Canned Harris awaits opening

Harris,34, was waived by theaSeattle
Seahawks Tuesday after it became in-
creasingly clear he wasn't going to fill
the gaping void left by the knee injury
to Curt Warner.
IN EIGHT games with the Seahawks,
Harris rushed for 170 yards on 68
carries, an average of just 2.5 yards. He
looked slow and his -productivity was
dropping even more in recent games.
Harris rushed for only three yards on
three carries in his final appearance in
the Monday night game against San
Diego.

Harris' release by Seattle suggests he
has reached the end of a 121/2-year pro
football career highlighted by four
Super Bowl titles with the Pittsburgh
Steelers and the third highest career
rushing total in NFL history.
Bart Beier, Harris' Pittsburgh-based
agent, admitted it's unlikely any team
will want to sign the veteran running
back for the remainder of the 1984
season.
"I think it's tough at this point in the
year for another team to pick him up,"
said Beier.

As Prosecutor, Sallade will establish a special team to protect you from criminal sexual
assaulty and spouse abuse. The right to dissent and the right to Picket will be safeguarded
VOTE FOR
George Wahr
SALLADE
for Prosecuting Attorney - WASHTENAW COUNTY
Paid for by the Committee to elect George Wahr Sallade for Prosecuting Attorney. Fulton Eaglin, Treasurer

Action SportsWear

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GRIDDE PACKS

OK, we've tried everything. We've
begged, we've pleaded, we've tried cute
little gimmicks, and still no one is tur-
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Even the lure of a free, small one-
item pizza from Pizza Bob's has not at-
tracted the plethora of entries it should.
There's only one thing left to do. Its
time to pull out the emergency bait:
Slim Whitman plays Griddes. Need we
say any more? Bring your picks to the
Daily, 420 Maynard, by Friday evening.
1. MICHIGAN at Purdue
2. Indiana at Ohio State

3. Minnesota at Illinois
4. Wisconsin at Iowa
5. Northwestern at Michigan St.
6. California at Washington
7. Missouri at Oklahoma
8. Texas at Texas Tech
9. Mississippi at Louisiana St.
10. Miami, Fla. at Louisville
11. No. Carolina at So. Carolina
12. Kansas St. at Oklahoma St.
13. Boston College at Penn St.
14. Auburn at Florida
15. Memphis St. at Georgia
16. Florida St. at Arizona St.
17. So. California at Stanford
18. Iowa St. at Nebraska
19. Duke at Georgia Tech
20. Frats against Fritz at Daily Libels

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