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October 26, 1984 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-26

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 26, 1984 - Page 3
All-male dorm boasts
tranquility and diversity

By ELYSE KIMMELMAN
When someone says dormitory living,
the University's Fletcher Hall usually
doesn't come to mind. But, located
behind the Intramural Sports Building
between Hoover and Sybil Streets,
Fletcher Hall really does exist.
With only 69 residents, the all-male
dorm is probably one of the Univer-
sity's "best kept secrets," said resident
director Jinny Bartel, a graduate
student.
FLETCHER Hall is the only dorm on
campus that is predominantly upper-
classmen and graduate students. This
year no freshmen live there and two-
thirds of the residents are gradute
students.
Although it is small, for the most
part, residents are happy living in Flet-
cher. There is a waiting list to get into
the dorm, and only two students are
trying to move out, Bartel said.
"Everyone knows each other and
there is a spirit of camraderie," Bartel
added.
"YOU GET to know all the people and
it's like livinig in a little frat," added
dorm president Mike Schule, LSA
sophomore.
Some students choose to live in Flet-

cher because it is not right in the center
of campus. "It's a nice place to come
home to and doesn't feel like I'm at
school," said resident and LSA
sophomore Eric Burton.
Fletcher is also the most inexpensive
dorm on campus. Although there is no
meal plan, students can purchase meal
cards to use at other residence halls, or
use the kitchen in the dorm.
THE AVERAGE age of residents is 22
and half of the residents are foreign
students, which create an atmosphere
different than in any other dorm.
One benefit of this diverse at-
mosphere, according to resident Chris
Priebe, a junior in the business school,

is that he can go down to the kitchen
about 12 o'clock every night and find
foreign students cooking dishes from
their countries.
The dorm is quiet because of the size
and nature of the students. Most of the
graduate students are tired of large
parties and want a quiet place where
they can study.
"If you want to party then do it
some place else," said one resident who
asked to remain anonymous.
Students who live in Fletcher do have
a social life, however. Dorm activities
include pre-football game parties, in-
formal get-togethers, and intramural
sports.

Associated Press
Chew-chew
Engines of two Illinois Central and Gulf trains collide head-on in Columbia, Mo. yesterday. The State Highway Patrol
say four trainmen suffered minor injuries.

-HAPPENINGS
Highlight
To promote school spirit, the Student Alumni Council will be holding a
Diag rally at noon and a Trivial Pursuit Party from 8-10 p.m. in the Pen-
dleton Room of the Union.
Films
Mediatrics-All That Jazz, 7 & 9p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Act. - Casablanca, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - Mad Max, 7, 8:45, 10:30 p.m., Lorch.
AAFC - The Human Factor, 7 p.m.; Women in Love, 9 p.m., Nat Sci.
Cinema II - The Big Chill, 7 & 9 p.m., Angell Aud A, Angell Hall.
Performances
Theatre & Drama - Antigone, 8p.m., Trueblood.
Ark - folksingers Peter & Lou Berryman, 8 p.m., 637S. Main.
Performance Network - Dance Theatre II, 8 p.m., 408 West Washington.
Brecht Co. - Play, Thirteenth Night, 8 p.m., Residential Colege
Auditorium.
Reader's Theatre Guild - Halloween reading, "Things that go Bump in
the Night," 8 p.m., Anderson Room, Union.
Speakers
Anthropology Colloquium Series - Richard Stoffle, "Development and
Native American Sacred Sites: Exercises in Public Interest Anthropology,"
4 p.m., 4051 LSA.
Statistics - Prof. Thomas Louis, "Time-Ordered Adaptative Design," 4
p.m., 451 Mason.
Meetings
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., Memorial Christian
Church, corner Hill & Tappan.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Study - 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church,
1001 E. Huron.
Korean Christian Fellowship - 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship -8 p.m., 225 Angell.
Press Club - 9 a.m., Ann Arbor Inn.
International Students Fellowship -7 p.m., 4100 Nixon.
Miscellaneous
Korean Studies Group - Seminar, W.C. Kim, "Confucianism & Today," 8
p.m., Rm. D, League.
Computing Center - Tell-A-Graf, 1:30 p.m., 171 Business Administration.
School of Nursing - Open House 1:00 P.m., North Campus Commons.
WJJX - Hockey Game, U-M vs. Bowling Green, 7:30 p.m.
Martha Cook - International Tea, 3:30 p.m.
Guild House - Luncheon Series, "Women & Social change," Joyce
Kornbluh, noon, 802 Monroe.
Extension Service - Michigan Association Concerned with School-Age
Parents, 8 a.m., Marriott Inn.
International Folk Dance Club - Teaching Macedonian dancing, 7:30
p.m., Angell Elementary School Gym.
Continuing Medical Education - Course, "Magnetic Resonance &
Ultrasound Physics," 8 a.m., Towsley Center.
Army, Navy & Air Force ROTC - Haunted House, 7 p.m., basement of
North Hall.
Michigan Ensian - Senior pictures, 420 Maynard St.
Intrafraternity Council - Big Ten I.M. Football Championship, Univer-
sity of Illinois Sigma Chis vs. Phi Delta Theta from Michigan, 7 p.m., Mit-
chell Field.
Mathematics and Language - Conference, 9-11:45 a.m. Founders Room,
Alumni Center; 1- 4:35 p.m., MLB Aud 3; 6:40 - 8:25 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud.
B.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
For the best selection of quality
ADULT COSTUMES

Redgrave suit centers
on donations, safety

ANN ARBOR CANTATA
SINGERS
BRADLEY BLOOM, Conductor
Performing Music of Palestrina, Bach, Brahms, Copeland
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
Sunday, October 28 - 4:00 P.M.
Tickets $6 Students and Seniors $4
HAUNTED

BOSTON (AP) - Actress Vanessa
Redgrave testified yesterday that a
booking agent feared she might be shot
if she appeared with the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra, but the orchestra
manager says he worried that her work
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization would cut Jewish con-
tributions.
The Academy Award-winning actress
is suing the orchestra for $5 million for
canceling a series of performances in
April 1982 because of her PLO sym-
pathies.
TESTIFYING yesterday in her own
behalf for about an hour, Redgrave
angrily said, "People have got a right
to decide if they want to see something
themselves."
She said a "fantastic" number of
people opposed her hiring to narrate
Igor Stravinsky's "Oedipus Rex."
"We expected protest, but nothing
like this," she said a booking agent told
her a month before the performance.
She quoted him as saying: "What will
you do if you're shot?"
"I think that was a bit excessive,
because what can you do," she said.
HER TESTIMONY was to continue
today.

Orchestra officials contended more
was at risk than just protests over the
performance.
By sponsoring the famous PLO sup-
porter, the orchestra could have lost the
support of Jewish patrons, BSO general
Manager Thomas Morris said. "If
we went ahead, it very well might af-
fect fund-raising."
REDGRAVE SPARKED an uproar in
1978 when she branded Jewish demon-
strators "Zionist hoodlums" after
receiving an Academy Award.
She became a center of controversy
again in 1980 when she played a Jewish
survivor of a Nazi death camp in the
television movie "Playing for Time."
A member of the British left-wing
Workers Revolutionary Party, she has
narrated two documentaries by the
PLO and accused Israel of crimes
against Palestinians that "hideously
mirror the crimes of the Nazis."
Redgrave, famous for her roles in
such movies as "Camelot" and
"Julia," has sued for breach of contract
- $31,000 for the six performaces
scheduled for New York City's Car-
negie Hall and western Massacheuset-
ts' Tanglewood - and $5 million for
violation of her civil rights.

Come ...
If You Dare
To the MORGUE

Follow the screams
or look for us next
to the U-M
Dental School.
North Hall
October 26, 27, 28
Admission: $1.00
All proceeds go
to UNICEF
Hours: 7 till 11pm

F I

We're celebrating
HALLOW EEN!

Build a career on
your language skills
at the
Monterey Institute of
International Studies

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Graduate Study - The Monterey Institute specializes
in graduate language studies and career-oriented programs
for students with strong language backgrounds. Master's
degrees are offered in the following areas: International
Management (MIBA), International Policy Studies,
International Public Administration (MIPA), Language
Studies, Translation and Interpretation, Teaching
English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL),
Teaching Foreign Languages (MATFL).
Undergraduate Study - The Monterey Institute offers
Junior and Senior level coursework leading to the BA
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Intensive Summer Language, June to August -
Intensive course for beginning and intermediate
language students. Up to 12 semester units of credit.
Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), English (ESL), French,
German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian
and Spanish. Language houses available.
A school representative will visit this campus:
October 30, 1984
Please make arrangements with:
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
For more information, contact Monterey Institute of
International Studies, Office of Admissions,
425 Van Buren, Monterey, CA 93940.

BUSIflESS

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UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT WITH ADMISSIONS REPRESENTATIVES
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INFORMATION ON ADMISSIONS, COURSE REQUIREMENTS, AND CAREER
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