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October 15, 1984 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-15

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 15, 1984 - Page 3
34 arrested, 1 killed in fan violence

From AP andd UPI
TIGERTOWN - Hundreds of fans
roamed streets blockaded by buses
early today as police tried to limit
World Series victory parties. that left
dozens injured, at least 34 arrested and
streets littered with burnt-out cars and
debris.
Thousands of Detroit fans poured into
downtown streets last night when the
Tigers beat the San Diego Padres 8-4 to
win their first series appearance since
1968.
Raymond Dobrynski, a 27-year-old
Pittsfield Twp. man was shot and
killed near a downtown restaurant.
Detroit police said this morning they
had no suspects in the shooting.
THE AIR along Michigan Avenue
outside Tiger Stadium smelled of bur-
ning tires, marijuana, beer, and horse
manure soon after the victory. Broken
glass crunched underfoot.
A police car and a taxicab were tor-
ched in hours of violence that forced
authorities to close a park, an office
complex and freeways leading down-
town.
A man walked to an overturned
taxicab outside the stadium, removed
the gasoline tank cap, and tossed in a
match. The cab burst into flames with a
roar. Later, the crowed tossed a motor-
cycle into the fire..

"I KNOW there were some rowdy
fans tonight," said Pam Collins, 23, of
Royal Oak. "But this is the World
Series, and you've got to expect some
kind of rowdiness."
Scores of police, some clad in riot
gear, some brandishing broken boards,
struggled until 10 p.m., more than two
hours after the game ended to control,
the crowds.
One police car was burned and two
sustained major damage, and four of-
ficers were treated for minor injuries
that did not require hospitalization,
Williams said. He said 32 adults and two
juveniles were arrested on charges
ranging from disorderly conduct to
robbery.
POLICE could not immediately
provide an estimate of property
damage.
A man lay in the middle of Michigan
Avenue, a piece of sod from the field
was tucked under his head for support.
Maureen Nystrom, 20, of Dearborn
Heights, said she saw police officers hit
the man.
Rescue vehicles could not respond
quickly because the crowds made
streets surrounding the stadium nearly
impassable.
Early today, several hundred people
continued honking car horns, waving
pennants and shouting, and private
parties rocked on. Police used city

buses to form blockades on several
major streets leading downtown in an
effort to keep the crowd from
spreading.
ABOUT THREE hours after the
game, plolice closed the downtown
Renaissance Center, an office, hotel,
and retail complex. Freeways leading
into the downtown area were closed to
all but emergency vehicles.
Police also closed Hart Plaza, a
downtown riverfront park, and disper-
sed another rowdy crowd there.
Despite the unrest, Williams said the
crowd was more orderly than the one
that poured into the streets after the
Tigers won the 1968 series.
"They were orderly considering the
people," he said. "If you could have seen
the number of people down here. They
were on the streets for miles."
The chaos spilled into the ex-
pressways as cars tried to leave the
area. In the worst multiple-car ac-
cident, 10 people suffered minimum in-
juries on the Lodge Expressway.
The streets finally emptied in the
early morning hours after a heavy
downpour, leaving policemen in yellow
rain jackets at major intersections and
the broken remains of the celebration.

Detroit police officers ring the infield at Tiger Staium as fans fill the field after the World Series winning victory.

1111.1 p4i Gi~bson homers cook oose

(Continued from Page 1)
Thurmond offering into the upper deck
in right center field putting the Tigers
up 2-0.
Detroit's opening inning barrage con-
tinued as Lance Parrish, Larry Her-
ndon and Chet Lemon followed with
consecutive singles. Parrish scored on
Lemon's single and Thurmond was
yanked in favor of long reliever Andy
Hawkins.
San Diego had threatened in the top of
the first when Alan Wiggins opened the
game with a sharp single off Dan Petry.
While National League batting cham-
pion Tony Gwynn was striking out,
Wiggins stole second. The second
baseman moved to third when
Parrish's throw sailed into center field.
But Wiggins was thrown out at home
plate on a sharp Steve Garvey groun-
der.
WHILE HAWKINS got one in the
third when Bobby Brown beat out anin-
field hit, moved to third on two infield
outs and scored on another infield
single by Garvey.
In the fourth, San Diego scored twice
to tie the game at 3-3 and knocked Petry
out. Petry, who had a regular season
record of 18-8 and along with Jack
Morris was the staff's stopper, failed to
win a post-season game for the Tigers.
KURT Bevacqua walked to open the
frame and went to third on Garry Tem-
pleton's double after Carmello Mar-
tinez had struck out. Bobby Brown's
sacrifice fly scored Bevacqua and then
Wiggins ripped a single to plate Tem-
pleton, at which point Detroit manager
Sparky Anderson lifted Petry for Bill
Scherrer. Scherrer got Gwynn to fly out
to end the inning with the game tied.
With two away in the fifth and Nettles
at second via a single and a fielder's

choice, Anderson decided to bring in
reliever Aurelio Lopez, who fanned
Bevacqua to end the inning.
Detroit took the lead for good in the
bottom of the fifth when Gibson singled
off Nettles' glove, took second on a deep
sacrifice fly by Parrish and went to
third after consecutive walks to Her-
ndon and Lemon.
RUSTY KUNTZ came on to pinch hit
for Grubb and lofted a short but high fly
to right.hRight fieldersGwynn lost the
ball in the light -and second baseman
Wiggins had to make the catch while
running away from home plate.
"I lost it as soon as it went up," said
Gwynn. "That's the worst feeling as an
outfielder. I hate to have a World
Series decided on a play like that, but
that's what happened."
Showing his blazing speed, Gibson
scored easily from third as Wiggins'
throw trickled toward Padre catcher
Terry Kennedy.
LOPEZ MOWED down the next six
Padres with ease, retiring all seven
Padres he faced in the game.
In the seventh, after Gibson struck
out, Padre manager Dick Williams
decided to bring in relief ace Rich
"Goose" Gossage in an effort to slam
the door on the Tigers, thus keeping his
club within one run.
BUT TO THE dismay and surprise of
Williams, Parrish clobbered Gossage's
second pitch into the left field seats in
what proved to be the game-winning
RBI. For the flame-throwing Gossage,
it was the first run he had allowed in his
last seven World Series appearances.
Sparky Anderson then brought in his
relief wizard and American League Cy
Young Award favorite, Willie Hernan-
dez, to preserve Detroit's 5-3 advan-
tage.

SAN DIEGO
ab
Wiggins 2b ..... 5
Gwynn rf.... ...5
Garvey lb .....4
Nettles 3b .....3
Kennedy c ..... .4
Bevacq dh .....3
Martinez if .... 4
Salazar cf .....0
Templtn ss ....4
Brown cf ...... 2
Bochy ph ......1
Roenick pr .... 0
Totals ...... 35

DETROIT

r
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
0
4

h
2
0
1
1
0
1
2
0
1
1
1

bi
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0

ab r
Whitakr.......4 1
Trmmll ss......4 1
Gibson rf ......4 3
Parrish c ......5 2,
Herndon if ....4 0
Lemon cf.......3 0
Garbey dh .....1 0
Grubb ph ......o 0
Kuntz ph ......0 0
Johnsn ph ....1 0
Evanslb ......4 0

h
1
0
3
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
11
200
010

bi
0
0
5
1
0'
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
8
010-4
13x-8

0 0 Bergmn lb ....0
Castillo 3b .....3
10 4 Totals...... 33

0
1
8

San Diego ..........

... ........ ...............001

D etroit .........................................300
Game-winning RBI--Kuntz (1).

E-Parrish, Wiggins. DP-San Diego 1. LOB-San Diego 7,

Detroit 9. 2B-Templeton.

HR-Gibson 2

(2),
(1),

Parrish
Lemon

Associated Press
Tiger Kirk Gibson is greeted by pitcher Jack Morris after his eighth inning
home run last night.

Bevacqua (2). SB-Wiggins (1),
S-Trammel. SF-Brown, Kuntz.
San Diego
Thurmond ............ ............
Hawkins (L 1-1) ...................
Lefferts . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . .. . . ..
Gossage ........:...................
Detroit
Petry .............................
Scherrer........ . .. . . . . . . . . . .
Lopez (W 1-0) ...................... .
Hernandez ( 2) .. .. ... . .. . .. . . .. .. .

IP H R
% 5 3
4 2- 1
2 1 0
1% 3 4

ER
3
1
0
4

BB
0
3
1
1

Parrish

(1),
SO
0
1
2
2

32/3
21/3
2

6
1
0
3

3
0
0
1

3 2 2
0 0 0
0 0 4
1 0 0
A-51,901.

HBP-by Hawkins (Grubb). WP-Hawkins. T-2:55.

Local partiers raise hell for Tigers

(Continued from Page 1)
We marched down State Street to Nickels Arcade, and then back to State.
We were a happy mob, all of us leaders and all of us followers. We ran to the
diag. Someone shouted "UGLi!" Now the real fun would begin.
We poured through the entrance of the library, obtrusive intruders in the
quiet world of academia. As hundreds of us streamed past the open glass
doors on the main floor, a panicky librarian quickly phoned security. The
look in her eyes reminded me of those great old Japanese monster movies,
when one of the helpless Tokoyoans would look up and say, "Oh no! It's God-
zilla !" She was that rattled.
Two security officers did eventually come but they knew it was useless.
They watched, speaking into their walkie-talkies. Nothing could stop us and
they knew it. Not even The Code could stop us. Our numbers were growing,
up to 500, maybe more.
Next we decided to pay a visit to President Harold Shapiro's house. "Come
out and play, Hal," someone yelled. Apparently Hal wasn't home. Maybe he
was celebrating downtown.
The law library was the next stop. I have to admit I was uncertain about
this one. This was sacred ground, not to be defiled by our buffoonery. I
hesitated, and then joined my comrades inside. I'll bet years from now
they'll still be talking about the party in the law library reading room.

We converged on the center of the room, thro*ing confetti, spraying each
other with beer. The noise was deafening. I stood up on a table, swinging my
jacket around like a crazy fool. I stopped to look around the splendid room.
Mouths were hung open. Eyes blinked in disbelief. The sturdy studiers
probably had a hard time believing their eyes. An orgy of sweaty, half-
drunken idol-worshippers were violating their holy ground. After the initial
shock wore off, however, I saw smiling faces. They understood. It was a
World Series study break the magnitude of which they will never experience
again.
That turned out to be the climax of the evening. After that we should have
rolled over and smoked a cigarette. But we were insatiable. We wanted it to
last all night.
It was on the to the Union, and then the grad library. Someone got smart at
the grad. They locked us out. "We wanna study! We wanna study!" we
screamed. We laughed, pleased with our collective sense of humor.
After that it was strictly denoument. We split. into two groups, one
headed for Stockwell, the other staying to harrass the grad. It was probably
quite a thrill for the Stockwell girls. My group went on from there toward
Markley, but I had had enough. The best of the evening was over. I was hap-
py. The celebration I waited all my life for was over.
I wonder if they had this much fun downtown?

Post-game partiers took their party to the streets

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' .,
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1.

(Continued from Page 1)
The security people knew the end was
close too. In the fifth inning a small
contigent of security guards moved out
onto the field and took up positions near
the screen behind home plate. For the
t
top of the ninth, however, half the
Detroit Police force walked out onto the
:. field clad in riot gear, showing its
potential strength to those in the stands.
A warning even came over the PA
system telling fans to keep off the field
when the contest was over.
But it was all to no avail. When Larry
Herndon caught Tony Gwynn's popup
for the final out. the fans flooded the

The police formed a circle around the
infield and made numerous arrests, but
there were just too many people to han-
dle.
Meanwhile, other fans remained in
the stands merely watching the spec-
tacle. Many on the field threw pieces of
sod to those up in the stands, assuring a
momento to nearly everyone who wan-
ted one.
Outside the stadium, the 51,901 in at-
tendance were met by hundreds of
thousands of other Tiger fans who had
come downtown to join the party. All
the major streets and many of the side
streets around the stadium were

Music blasted and strangers hugged
and high-fived each other. People
passed around beers and jammed the
bars and clubs. It started to rain, but-
that didn't dampen the party - it never
does when you have something to

celebrate. The fans in Detroit had
waited a long time and taken a lot of
knocks from critics of the game, so this
was all worth it.
Next time, though, let's not wait so
long.

With fine darkroom products from :

JOBO

I FORD

AG FA

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