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October 12, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-12

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4

Page 2 -,The Michigan Daily - Frid
Mother
WASHINGTON (AP) - After post-
poning childbearing into their late 20s
as they pursued careers in recent
years, large numbers of American
women are now waiting even longer -
often to - their late 30s - to have
children, new government statistics
show.
"An increasing proportion of women
who have been delaying childbearing
seem to be postponing their first births
until their mid- or even late-30s," the
National Center' for Health Statistics
said in its final report on births in 1982.
BETWEEN 1981 and 1982, the first-
birth rate fell by less than 1 percent for
women 15 to 19 years old, by 1 percent
for women 25 to 29 years and by 2 per-
cent for women aged 20 to 24, the report
said.
"In sharp contrast, the rate in-

ay, October 12, 1984
s postpone
creased by 10 percent for women aged ths and
30-34 years and by 18 percent for women also fell.
aged 35-39 years," the study said. In a w
Out of 1,000 women interviewed, 14.6 women tc
percent had their first child between major ec
the ages of 30 and 34. This rate has out.
doubled in the past decade. For those And b
women aged 35 to 39, late childbearing take par
has increased by 83 percent. -increase
THE TREND to postpone child- problems
bearing into the middle or late 20s has offspring
been widely noted in recent years as "A CO
young women pursued education and have chi
established themselves in careers value th
before embarking on motherhood. time, car
But the new statistics indicate even and mob
further delays than have been reported in a stud
in the past. There was a substantial in- tember
crease in first births to women in their, Demogra
30s, while those in the 25-29 age group The stu
actually had a small decline in first bir- women in

childbearing

the rate for younger women
orld where it is the norm for
o work, this decision also has a
onomic component, he pointed
iological considerations also
t, with physicians indicating
ed possibility . of medical
s for older mothers and their
UPLE decides if and when to
ildren based on the relative
ey place on children, leisure
reer, and a lifestyle of privacy
ility," David Bloom observed
dy of childbearing in the Sep-
issue of American
aphics magazine.
udy found that children both to
n the 25-29 and 30-34 age groups
st likely .to have a low birth
1982, while those most at risk
n to teen-agers and to women

over 40.
The median weight of babies
delivered in 1982 was 3,370 grams, 7
pounds, 7 ounces, slightly more than the
1979-81 average' of 3,360 grams. But
there was a sharp racial difference,
with white babies averaging a half-
pound heavier than blacks.
THE 1982 births report disclosed that
while 99 percent of births occur in
hospitals there has been a sharp in-
crease in use of home births attended
by midwives.
The study, released this week, also
found use of midwives to assist in birth
has been increasing and reported a rise
in childbearing by unmarried women.
Births occurring outside of hospitals,
attended by midwives, totaled 14,375 in
1982, 12 percent more than the year
before. And midwives also assisted in
63,062 hospital births, up from 55,537 in
1981.

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weight in
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Campuses ar
(Continued from Page 1)
THE 125 educators attending the con-
ference compared notes on how to en-
courage responsible drinking by
students and to hear pledges" of support'
from representatives of the major
breweries.
The conference was organized by
BACCHUS - Boost Alcohol Con-
sciousness Concerning the Health of
University Students - a project started
at the University of Florida in 1976 that
now has chaptersat 180 colleges in the
United States and Canada. The con-.
fereace also marked the start of the fir-
st National Collegiate Alcohol
Awareness Week.
Dennis Roberts, assiciate dean of
students and director of housing at
Southern Methodist University in
Dallas, expressed fear that educators
are being "blackmailed by students
saying, 'Well, if you're not going to
allow us to drink on campus, we'll drive
drunk."'
ROBERTS SAID he has misgivings
about the age 21 bandwagon, saying
that traffic statistics"show thatsmale
drivers age 21-24 have just as high a
rate of accidents as those age 18-20.
"Why not go to 25?" asked Roberts,
whose own campus imposed a tem-
porary ban on drinking this fall after
problems with fraternities and
sororities. The drinking age in Texas is
19.
Nancy Schulte, assistant director of
residence life for Louisiana State
Univerrsity in, Baton Rouge,a state
with an age 18 law, said, "We in student
affairs are doing lots as far as positive
alcohol education, but one block away
off campus there are all the bars with
the 3-for-1 drinks every day and quar-
ter-beer nights."
SOME STATES lowered their
drinking ages in the early 1970s when-
the voting age was lowered to 18.New
Jersey and Maryland already have

e sobering up
moved them back to 21. Wisconsin
moved its age to 19 in July, and
Arizona, and Nebraska will move up to
21 in January from 19 and 20, respec-
tively. Ohio moved its age to 19, but
voters rejected a move to 21.
Michigan's drinking age has been 21
since 1980..
Gregory Moore, 24, president of a
lobbying group called the U.S. Student
Association, said the loss of jobs at pubs
is a major concern for students. "It's
totally unfair," he said, "Prohibition
didn't work in the 1920s, and prohibition
from 18 to 21 won't work in this instance
either."
Dr. Edward Hammon, vice president
for student affairs at the University of
Louisville, told of a $137,000 judgment
against an Ohio State University
student organization that sponsored a
party followed by a fatal car crash. ,
OTHER eductators worried that
closing the pub could crimp the student
activities budget.
Max Vest, director of student ac-
tivities at the University of Richmond
in Virginia, said, "Like the other cam-
puses, I depend quite a bit on that sale
of beverage to finance my student ac-
tivity programs."
Terry Callahan, director of alcohol
programs for the U.S. Brewers
Association, said the brewing industry
has revised its voluntary advertising
guidelines this year. Among the new
strictures is a ban on any beer ad that
portrays "beer drinking as being im-
portant to education" or that "directly"
or indirectly degrades studying," she
said.
BACOHUS and the national organiz-
tions of deans and housing chiefs have
developed their own marketing
guidelines, including a ban on chugging
contests and a requirement that food
and non-alcoholic drinks also be offered
if beer is given away in a promotion.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
U.S. woman takes space walk
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Kathy Sullivan jubilantly broke another
American sex barrier yesterday by walking and working for three hours in
the hostile vacuum of space 137 miles above Earth.
"Oh, this is really amazing," she said 21/2 hours into the space walk.
"We're coming over Venezuela. They never described it this way in the tour
guide."
At one point, the 33-year-old geologist floated over the side of the winged
spaceship, grabbing a hand rail with one hand, and fixed the ship's broken
data transmission antenna in time to beam back television of the final
minutes of the spacewalk.
"Orbital Repair strikes again," she said.
Sullivan and Leestma, wearing multi-layer pressure suits worth $2 million
each, spent more than three hours working outside, circling Earth twice at
17,500 mph. They remained leashed to the shuttle by lifelines at all times.
Whooping cough still kills kids
ATLANTA - Pertussis, the once-common childhood disease also known
as "whooping cough," remains a serious health problem and will not disap-
pear soon, federal health officials reported yesterday.
The national Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said 2,463 cases of per-
tussis were reported last year, up from 1,895 cases the year before. So far
this year, 1,764 have been reported. An epidemic, which has since subsided,
was reported in Seattle earlier this year. Pertussis can be a serious disease
causing pneumonia, hemorrhaging, seizures, brain disease and death. Fif-
teen deaths were reported in the years 1982-83.
Peitussis vaccine has been in widespread use since the 1950s, but
eradication of the disease likely will not come anytime soon, said Dr. Alan
Hinman, director of the Atlanta-based CDC's immunization division.
"I don't think it's feasible" to talk about eradication, Hinman said,
"There's enough that we do not know about the disease...."
In that regard, pertussis differs from childhood, diseases such as measles
and rubella. Researchers say strongly that those may be wiped out in the
United States in coming years.
In the '82 and '83 cases, 43 percent of the victims - and all but two of the 15
who died - were less than 6 months old, the CDC said in its Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report. Those cases were in children too young to get per-
tussis vaccinations, "so you cannot call them strictly preventable," Hinman
said.
Hispanics not utilizing state
mental health care facilities
LANSING, Mich. - A report released yesterday suggests Hispanics who
need help are not utilizing Michigan's mental health system.
The Michigan Hispanic Mental Health Association, which prepared the
report, said increasing the number of bilingual and bicultural mental health
professionals is key to solving the problem.
The most serious mental and emotional problems suffered by Hispamcs
are depression, alcoholism, anxiety and identity, the report said.
Mental health director Patrick Babcock said the department plans a num-
ber of steps, including training more bilingual doctors and counselors and
reaching out to Hispanics through their community centers, to deal with the
problem.
Babcock said the department is seeking $1 million in fiscal 1986 for
professional training and internship programs. A portion of that will be
earmarked for bilingual and bicultural trainees, he said.
Panama vows to protect treaty
PANAMA CITY, Panama - Panama's new civilian president
promised in an inaugural speech yesterday that his administration will
"scrupulously" respect the U.S. canal treaties.
Nicolas Ardito Barletta, an American-educated economist, was sworn in
for a five-year term at a ceremony in.the capital's Atlapa Convention Cen-
ter. Secretary of State George Shultz headed the U.S. delegation to the
inauguration.
Ardito Barletta, 46, 'a graduate in economics from the University of
Chicago, was the first civilian president directly elected in Panama in 16
years. All the others were chosen by means of an indirect process controlled
by the military.
Under the U.S. canal treaties - which will give Panama full control of the
canal by the year 2000 - Panama promised to remain neutral and to allow
unhindered passage through the canal to ships of all nations.
"We will respect scrupulously our commitments and international
agreements and we hope that the nations of the international community do
the same with us, especially the United States of America regarding the
Torrijos-Carter treaties about the Panama Canal and its neutrality," the
new president said.
Court denies murderer's story
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court voted 7-2 yesterday to let convicted
Virginia murderer Linwood Briley die today.
The justices rejected an emergency request aimed at keeping Briley alive
untilhis lawyers could file a formal appeal challenging his conviction for the
1979 slaying of a Richmond disc jockey.
Briley, scheduled to die in Virginia's electric chair at 11 p.m. today, lost
his latest previous appeal before the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on

Tuesday - the same day the Supreme Court left intact by a 7-2 vote a
previous 4th Circuit court ruling in Briley's case.
The high court's denial of Briley's request for a stay of execution drew
dissenting votes from Justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall,
who oppose capital punishment under all circumstances.
gaa
Vol. XCV - No.32
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
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(Continued from Page 1)
table in January to try and iron out a
new contract with the University., The
current contract was ratified by the
Union last November. It was the
union's first successful contract.
Controversy over the tax issue arose
last winter after TAs found that the
University was the only institution in
the country to withhold the money.
Since January, TAs have paid an
average of $75 a month more in taxes
because the law expired.
GEO filed a grievance to get the
University to make up the difference in
pay because the union said the tax was
not figured in to the existing contract.

The University refused to meet the
demand, but offered loans to TAs who
were experiencing financial dif-
ficulties because of tht tax.
Corrections
A lecture by South African novelist
Nadine Gordimer will speak today at 4
p.m. in MLB 3. Yesterday's Daily in-
correctly reported the date of the lec-
ture.
Nobody for President-supporter
Spacy Schlecter was incorrectly iden-
tified in yesterday's Daily. She is not a
member of the tour who related a story
about the tour's visit to Madison, Wis.

14

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Pilgrimage Toward Justice, Peace and Hope
led by brothers from the Ecumenical Community
in Taize, France.
October 19th and 20th
FRIDAY: 7:30 p.m. - Evening Prayers around the Cross in solidarity with
suffering people around the world. St. Francis of Assissi Catholic Church,
2250 E. Stadium Blvd. Social Time.
SATURDAY: 9:00 - Morning Prayers; Scri eStudy, silence, discussion
around the Theme of the pilgritage.
Noon Prayers
Above events at Second Bptist Church, 850 Red Oak, Ann Arbor
3:00 - 5:00 p.m. Visits with people from places of justice and hope in
Ann Arbor during apeacefairat First Baptist Church, 512 E. Huron, Ann Arbor
6:00 p.m. Supper at First Raptst>Church
7:00 p.m. Candle-lightvwalk to St. Andres's; 306 N. Division, Ann Arbor
7:30 p.m. Festival of resurrection, St. Andrew's, 306 N. Division, Ann Arbor
Sponsored by a widely Ecumenical Group of Christian Churches
For more information call 668-7421 or 761-6273

s

II

The Medieval and Renaissance Collegium
ANNOUNCES
THE LADY
A un ~TLuC U'iiinuiT

l

Editor in chief ......................BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors.................CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors.............LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor .......................SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors ................. JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Lily Eng, March Fleisher, Bob Gordon,
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Sports Editor ...........
Associate Sports Editors

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SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretho, Mark Borowski Joe
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Morgan. Jerry Mth. Phil Nussel Mike Redstone
Scott Solowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan Warner.

Business Manager.
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Display Manager
Nationals Manager ....

STEVEN BLOOM
MICHAEL MANASTER
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