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October 05, 1984 - Image 11

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-05

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 5, 1984 - Page 1],

The weekly Doily line

Phillis Ocker, take a bow. Last week
Michigan's women's athletic director
went an AWSOME 9-1.
All week long, the Daily sports
editors have been receiving complaints
'rtaining to Ocker's presence as our
spe ial guest. "Who is Phyllis Ocker?
Or. even more desultory, "Who cares
about the women's athletic director."
PHYLLIS HAS silenced the critics
once and for all.
This week's special guest should be
properly referred to as 'the Savior.'

Red Berenson has come home to
Michigan to coach Wolverine hockey.
Berenson ('62) was twice Michigan's
MVP and twice an All-American before
skating to a brilliant 16-year National
Hockey League career. Berenson
distinguished himself as a coach in
1980-'81 when he guided the St. Louis
Blues to the Stanley Cub semi-finals
and won NHL coach-of-the-year honors.
Last year Berenson was an assistant
coach under Scotty Bowman for the
Buffalo Sabres when Michigan came

calling after having dismissed John
Giordano as hockey coach.
As for being special guest of the Daily
Line, Berenson may have one problem.
"Until last Saturday, I hadn't been to a
college football game in 22 years,"
claimed Berenson a few days after
Michigan's 22-14 victory over Miami-
Fla.
Person to watch: Paul Helgren who
had his best week last week going 7-3.
"It was easy, I just copied McGraw's
picks."

White cut f
By PAUL HELGREN
Gerald White, who was scheduled
to start at tailback for Michigan this
week, suffered an arm injury in
South Quad Tuesday evening that
will keep him out of the lineup
Saturday and possibly longer.
According to assistant head coach
Gary Moeller, White suffered a
laceration to his right forearm that
required ''about 20 stitches." He
said White sustained the cut after his
arm smashed through a glass door.
"HIS ARM is wrapped up to here
(pointing just about his elbow) with
ace bandages," Moeller said yester-
day. "No, he won't play (against
Michigan State)." Moeller was un-
certain how long White would be out.
White, a 6-1, 205-pound sophomore,
could not be reached for comment.
But his roommate, sophomore
linebacker Carlitos Bostic, said that
White had been told not to speak to
the press.

'om lineup
"Bo told us if anyone calls not to
say anything about it," Bostic said
from his South Quad dormitory
room. Schembechler was not
available for comment yesterday.
ACCORDING to one South Quad
resident, White was taken away in
an ambulance, his arm bleeding.
Blood stains were visible on the fifth
floor where the accident occurred.
Moeller said he was uncertain
about the circumstances surroun-
ding White's accident but said that
mishaps like this were common.
"I'm surprised we don't have more
of them," he said.
White is the second-leading rusher
for Michigan with 239 yards in three
games. A bruised thigh reduced
White's playing time, forcing him to
miss the Wisconsin game, but it had
healed for Saturday's game. White
and freshman Jamie Morris were to
have shared time at tailback.

Berenson

-'m Oi 0 'A

Katie Blackwell

Paul HeIgren

Douglas B. Levy

Mike McGraw

's

Michigan St. at MICHIGAN..
Ohio St. at Purdue:...... . ....
Wisconsin at Illinois .. ....
Iowa at Northwestern .......
Indiana at Minnesota ........
Oklahoma St. at Nebraska ...
Georgia at Alabama .........
North Carolina at Clemson
,-Miami-Fla.at Notre Dame ...
Stanford at UCLA..........

MICHIGAN
Ohio St.
Illinois
Iowa
Indiana
Nebraska
Georgia
Clemson
Miami-Fla.
UCLA

MICHIGAN
Ohio St.
Wisconsin ]
Iowa
Indianal
Nebraska
Alabama 1
Clemson
Miami-Fla.
UCLA
7-3f

MICHIGAN
Ohio St.
Illinois
Iowa
Indiana
Nebraska
Alabama
Clemson
Miami-Fla.
UCLA

MICHIGAN
Ohio St.
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Nebraska
Georgia
Clemson
Miami-Fla.
UCLA

Special Guest
Red Berenson
MICHIGAN
Ohio St.
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Oklahoma St.
Georgia
Clemson
Miami-Fla.
UCLA

, .
. .

Stickers end scoring
draught in 3-1 win

Last wee................... 7-3

41-4

7-3

9-t

20-20

26-14

29-11

27-13

Friendship at center of gridiron rivalry

By PAUL HELGREN
Sometimes the fiercest rivalries are
not between enemies, but friends.
Such is the case in tomorrow's
Michigan-Michigan State matchup.
While recent Wolverine domination of
the series has taken some of the lustre
out of the annual clash, to many of the
a players it's still the rivalry. Especially
to those who have something to prove to
their friend on the other side of the
firrig line.
MICHIGAN State's John McDowell
and, Michian's Andy Moeller, who
graduated together from Ann Arbor
Pioneer, will get their chance to lock
horns. When McDowell glances up from
his center position on special teams, the
man poised across from him will be a
familiar sight - his life-long buddy
Moeller.
''It's probably the biggest game of
my. life," said McDowell, who has
known Moeller since kindergarten.
McDowell, a junior, is the Spartan's
long-snapper on special teams and a
reserve offensive tackle.
Moeller, son of Michigan's assistant
head coach and defensive coordinator
Gary Moeller, is second-string
linebacker who also covers the center
on punts and field goal attempts. Like

McDowell, Moeller hasn't played much
until this season.
"THIS IS gonna be the first time we
get a chance to go against each other,"
Moeller said of their personal matchup.
"Neither of us have played much until
this year." But now both play impor-
tant roles on their teams, just like in the
good old days at the corner of Stadium
and Main.
McDowell, a Detroit News blue chip
lineman out of high school, was not
recruited by his favorite team,
Michigan. After some vascillation, the
four-sport letterman settled on
Michigan State. Now he wants to show
the home folks what he can do.
"I want to get home and show the
people I can play," said the 6-4, 272-
pound lineman. "It's a real big game
for me . . . maybe because I wasn't
given an opportunity to play at
Michigan."
UPON reflection McDowell confessed
he may have left Ann Arbor even if he
had been recruited, "just to get away."
But it took a while for McDowell to
break from his past as a Wolverine
backer. Even after he signed a letter of
intent in the winter of his senior year at
high school, McDowell felt torn by
divided allegiances.

"It was hard that spring," McDowell
said of his adjustment. He continued to
be a Wolverine fan "even into the fall"
of his freshman year. But before long
he became 100 percent Spartan.
Said Moeller, "After paying the price
for a couple of years he knows where
his allegiance is. When you get your
butt kicked on demo team enough, you
have no problem with your allegiance."

With Moeller's father on the
Michigan coaching staff, he never even
faced much of a recruiting decision, let
alone a change in allegiance. After a
solid career at Pioneer, collecting 106
tackles at middle linebacker his senior
year, Moeller paid his dues for a year
on the demonstration squad. He saw in-
frequent action in 1983, but has been a
visible contributor on defense and a
standout on special teams this season.
He is ninth on the team with 12 tackles.
No one has been more pleased than the
defensive coach.
"Yeah, I'm proud of him," Gary
Moeller said with a slow, easy smile.
And when Andy Moeller is in there on
Michigan State's first punt, you can
bet he will try to level the Spartan cen-
ter. Likewise, McDowell will try to flat-
ten that Wolverine trying to shoot up
the middle for the block.
But it's nothing personal, you under-
stand. A .good rivalry will do that to
even the best of friends.

By JOE EWING
It may have taken awhile, but the
Michigan field hockey team finally
broke into the win column this season
by downing Eastern Michigan, 3-1,
Wednesday in Ypsilanti.
The victory brings the Wolverines
overall record to 1-3-2; but more impor-
tantly, the team also achieved a few
things aginst EMU that they had set out
to do.
"WE HAD set some goals during the
week," said assistant coach Andrea
Wickerham. "The one that we talked
-most about was our passing. We worked
hard on our passing game and it
worked out pretty good in the game."
Evidence of how well it worked was

provided by forward Jamie Fry, who
collected two assists and helped the
Wolverines to break out of an early-
season scoring drought. Prior to the
win, Michigan had only managed two
goals in five contests.
Michigan got things going early when
Maura Brueger knocked in a loose ball
during a scramble in front of the Huron
cage at 1:22 of the first half. The
Wolverines then added to their lead at
22:30 when Fry set up Tracy Gaskins
for a tally.
FRY NOTCHED her second assist
nearly six minutes later when she
dished out a perfect pass from the
penalty corner to Lisa Schofield, who
quickly deposited the ball in the net.

It's the choice of the coaches
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McDowell vs. Moeller

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61

GRIDDE PICKS

1. Michigan St. at MICHIGAN (pick
score)
2. Ohio St. at Purdue
3. Wisconsin at Illinois
4. Iowa at Northwestern
5. Indiana at Minnesota
6. Texas at Rice
7. Oklahoma St. at Nebraska
18. Maryland at Penn St.
9. Washington at Oregon St.
10. Brigham Young'at Colorado St.

11. Florida St. at Memphis St.
12. Georgia at Alabama
13. No. Carolina at Clemson
14. USC at Washington St.
15. Miami, Fla. at Notre Dame
16. Stanford at UCLA
17. No. Carolina St. at Georgia Tech
18. Auburn at Mississippi
19. Dartmouth at Holy Cross
20. East Lansing Farm BQys at Daily
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