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October 05, 1984 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-05

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 5, 1984 - Page 5
Depression common, suicides rare at 'U'

By ELIZABETH REISKIN
While depression is a very common
experience among the general
p Aulation, suicidal behavior is a
distinct and relatively rare
phenomenon, according to Evelyn
Gauthier, a clinical psychologist for the
University student counseling office.
Officiats seek
moiato f or
South Quad
RA 's suicide
(Continied from Page 1)
as Sunday night, she. was dealing with
residents' concerns, dealing with house
business, and generally being a very
participatory and active staff mem-
ber," said John Heidke, associate
housing director.
. Mary Antieau, South Quad's building
director, said "there just didn'tseem to
by any clear indication that there was
a atything big (wrong)."
IN SOME of these cases, you never
k tow why,"she said.
kIn fact, Duffy's credentials and per-
f rmance in the first five weeks of her
j(b showed only that she was an out-
s anding RA, these officials said.
,Before being an RA she had done
volunteer work for the Public Interest
research Group in Michigan and was
t e chairperson of the Couzens Hall
lcoming committee one year. She
a o' was on a business internship
pfogram last summer and two sum-
njs .ago worked as a counselor at a
Sc p for the mentally impaired.
"THERE IS everything to indicate
that she would be a prime and excep-
tional RA," Heidke said.
Both officials said that the death was
not an indication of problems within the
housing system. Both felt that the
amount of crisis and advisory training
given resident advisors is adequate.
"Are we going to keep looking at
stress and how we handle it? Yes," said
Heidke. "We always have and will con-
tinue to. Will we double our efforts? No.
We are doing as much as we can.'
Meanwhile, residents of Thronson
House who did not know of the death
were informed late Wednesday night
and yesterday morning.
Housing officials trained as coun-
selors and officials from University
counseling services stayed in South
Quad Wednesday and yesterday to aid
residents.
PPOLICE
NOTES
Cassette player stolen
A cassette player, book bag and radio
headset were stolen during a break-in
on the 500 block of North Division, Ann
Arbor Police Sgt. Jan Suomala said
yesterday. The items were valued at
less than $125, he said.
According to Suomala, the break-in
Occurred between 7 and 9 p.m. Oct. 2.
Entry was gained through an unlocked
door, he said.
Robbery attempted
A man was the target of an attempted
armed robbery early yesterday in the
Diag, Ann Arbor Police Sgt. Jan
Suomala said.

The man was approached at about
12:30 a.m. by three Hispanic males, as
he was crossing the Diag, Suomala
said.
The assailants pulled out a four- or
five-inch knife and attempted to rob
him. The three men also, reportedly
tried to coax an Irish Setter into at-
tacking the man but the dog refused to
cooperate.
The man ignored the would-be rob-
bers, and left the Diag. "I guess they
jpst went their way and he went his," he
sad.
GRADUATE
STUDENTS!
Resident Advisor
Position Available
at Alice Lloyd Holl!
Pilot Program
COMPENSATION:
Room and Board
Apply at 1500 SAB
or
Call 764-7521 for Information
A Non-Dsicriminatory!
- ~ Affirmatiye Action Fmr loyer

Signs of depression often include
changes in sleeping or eating patterns
and perhaps even neglect for one's
health, she said. It may or may not in-
clude overt signs of sadness; some
people who are depressed just look
numb, she said.
SHE described depression as an "in-
ternal feeling of a subjective. sense 'of
loss, and sense of failure."
"When you have a very competitive
population like (the University), a B
can seem like a failure," she said.
Although many people believe that
suicidal behavior is the deep-end of
depression, Gauthier said that it is
really a very distinct attitude.
Depressed people recognize that their

feelings are temporary, while suicidal
individuals tend to feel that their con-
dition is permanent, she said.
"It's a sense of despair," she said.
"(But) it has a sense of time about it,
that life is hard and it's never going to
get any better."
EXTERNAL pressures make a dif-
ference in both depression and suicidal
behavior, but they are not what creates
despair, she said.
The important factor is how people
interpret those pressures. The same
pressures can challenge one person and
cause despair in another.
"The presence of pressure is not what
makes people depressed. "It's their
own internal interpretations."

SHE SAID that the best way to
prevent depression and suicidal
behavior is to provide a strong support
system of friends and relatives which
people in stressful situations can fall
back on.
"With every challenge we offer
people, we need to offer them supports,
too . . . most of what we know about
student suicides is that they tend to be
students who focus a lot on academic
achievement but are less well connec-
ted socially.
"My hunch 'is - particulary from
what I know about South Quad - that
there is also a tremendous amount of
esprit de corps. . . from what I've seen
on this campus the support is there."

THE NROC COLLEGE PROGRAM.
$2,000 EXPENSE MONEY AND
A NAVY OFFICER COMMISSION.
The two-year NROTC College Program offers you two years of expense
money that's worth up to $2,000, plus the challenge of becoming a
Navy Officer with early responsibilities and decision-making authority.
During your last two years in college the Navy pays for uniforms,
NROTC textbooks and an allowance of $100 a month for up to 20 months.
Upon graduation and completion of requirements. you become a
Navy Officer. with important decision-making responsibilities.
Call your Navy representative for more information on this
challenging program.
CONTACT LT. JOHN COSTELLO, NORTH HALL
764-1498
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.

torn apart by qt
temptation...
kept apart by pride...
but brought together
by a miracie!

im

Challenges...
And Opportunities
Abound At Harris

am%

A WORLD WIDE PICTURE

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MOTOWN I TOP 40
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DOORS OPEN AT 9:00
THE HEIDELBERG LOUNGE
215 N. MAIN - ANN ARBOR
Presented by Kostle Productions, Inc.

Harris Corporation is a $2 billion producer of state-of-the-art information processing,
communication and microelectronics products for the worldwide information technol-
ogy market. We employ 30,000 people and operate 35 plants in the U.S. and abroad.
Our products, systems, networks and components-which are used to process and
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You can learn more about rapidly expanding GSS as well as other high tech units of the
Corporation during...
On-Campus Interviews
Thursday (October 18)
See your Placement Office for details
Plan to attend our OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday (Oct. 17) from 6:30 to 8:30 PM
Marriott Inn (check board in lobby for room #)
Several of our Technical Managers will be there to talk with you.
Refreshments will be served.
We are an equal opportunity employer. M/F/HV
U.S. Citizenship is required for employment with our
Government Systems Sector
IF IT'S HAPPENING IN ELECTRONICS,
IT'S HAPPENING AT HARRIS.

$

THE 1984 HONEYWELL
FUTURIST AWARDS
COMPETITION
TRAVEL AGENDA: Your mission,
should you decide to accept, is to trans-
port yourself 25 years into the future,
take a look around and write three essays
of up to 500 words each. For the first
two essays, you are to write about signif-
icant developments in any two of the
following subject areas:
1) Electronic Communications,
2) Energy, 3) Aerospace, 4) Marine
Systems, 5) Biomedical Technology or
6) Computers. In a third essay, you
are to write about the societal impact
of the changes you've predicted. Your
entries will be judged according to
creativity (30%), feasibility (30%), clarity
of expression (30%) and legibility (10%).
PASSENGER QUALIFICATIONS:
Any person enrolled as a regular
full-time student at an accredited U.S.
college or university may enter, with
the exception of full-time faculty mem-
bers, previous winners and Honeywell
employees.
PACKING LIST: To enter the contest,
type (or clearly print) your name,
address, college and declared major on
andsx 11" sheet of paper We also
need your T-shirt size so we can
send you a Honeywell Futurist T-shirt
designed by French illustrator Jean
Michel Folon. Each of the three essays
should be typed, double-spaced, on
separate 8'I x 11" sheets without your
name at the top. All sheets should be
stapled together and sent, unfolded, to:
The Honeywell Futurist Awards
Competition, P.O. Box 2009F,
600 South County Road 18,
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55426.
All entries must be postmarked no
later than December 31, 1984. Winners
will be notified by mail by February
1, 1985. All prizes will be awarded.
PAYLOAD: A total of 30 winners will
be selected and awarded the following
prizes:
10 First Place Winners will receive
$2,000 and an all-expense paid trip for
two to the Honeywell Futurist Awards
Banquet in Minneapolis. They will
also be offered a paid 1985 Honeywell
Summer Int'ernship.
10 Second Place Winners will receive
(Z 7 l

FANTASY IS THE FUEL OF THE FUTURE.

THE 1984 HONEYWELL
FUTURIST AWARDS
:. COMPETITION
Beyond scientific speculation and extrapolation, perhaps
the richest inspiration for imavinine the future comes from

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