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September 06, 1984 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page 6- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 6, 1984
Ther e's a place for you in the
Michigan Student Assembly

North Campus beats the
Central Campus blues

We're working with you and for you on issues
that concern us - including financial aid, affirma-
tive action, campus safety, teaching quality and

University decision-making.

man1

consists of 39 elected members and many, many
volunteers. We want you to be one of us.

ms

- sponsored activities
you can get involved in:

By PETE WILLIAMS
For aspiring artists and engineers, it
is inevitable. For other students it is
merely an escape from their daily
academic routines. For still others, it is
the way home every night after classes.
The two-mile journey by bus to North
Campus.
It was way back in December 1949,
when the regents decided the farmland
north of the Huron River would be a
logical direction for the inevitable ex-
pansion of the University. Since that
time, North Campus has become the
stomping grounds for countless
musicians, artists, engineers, and ar-
chitects as well as a winter home for
about 7000 graduate and undergraduate
students in University housing.
The University's largest housing unit,
with a capacity of 1246 fun-loving male
and female undergraduates, is located
on North Campus, this multi-winged
monster is Bursley. It is a popular place
for a large population of the incoming
freshman class to get stuck.
But don't despair, the ride is free and
the buses run frequently between the
two campuses - except on weekends
when they are scheduled at half hour in-
tervals.
BURSLEY is not the only alternative
for students interested in a residence up
north. Baits housing, located right next
door to Bursley, houses 1152 un-
dergraduate and graduate students in a
more apartment-like atmosphere. Nor-
thwood apartments, designed for
married students and students with
families, has about 5000 tennants.
According to Director of Research for
the Housing Office Edward Salowitz,
the facilities are 40 to 45 percent
cheaper for families than comparable
apartments and houses in the area.
Salowitz said that the University built
the family housing on North Campus
because the wide open spaces and quiet
environment fostered in the area is
more conducive to family living than
that of bustling, crowded Central Cam-
pus, located inthecenter of Ann Arbor.
HE ALSO SAID economically, North
Campus is a desirable location. "To try
to build on Central Campus would cost
you an arm and a leg," Salowitz said.
And you can't beat the bus fare home.

" MSA News - an alternative bi-weekly journal providing
in-depth analyses of campus and non-campus issues.
* Advice- Academic Development Via Instructor and Course
Evaluation. Course evaluation booklet published; also works
to improve campus teaching practices.
" Internal Committees- Join an internal committee -
there are a dozen, concerned with issues such as Financial
Aid, Minority Affairs, Academic Affairs, and Women's issues,
to name a few.
" External Committees -- MSA appoints students to
University and Faculty sponsored committees, such as the
Board on Intercollegiate Athletics, the Civil Liberties Board,
and the Student Legal Services Board.
Student Services Provided by EIS
" Low-Cost Health - Property Insurance
" Student Legal Services- Funded by students through
the MSA fee, SLS provides pre-paid legal help to all students
and works to reform housing law, benefitting student con-
sumers.
* Tax Assistance Program -Knowledgeable assistance
provided to all students on a walk-in basis.
* Registration of Student Organizations
-Registration provides access to University facilities and services.

Daily Photo

A stark metal sculpture rests outside of the Art and Architecture Building on
North Campus. Inside the building, students can learn the art of painting,
sculpture, pottery, and architecture.

The
Daily

But the 35-year-oldicampus offers
more than a place to live that is off the
beatenpath. It is also the location of
several of the University's
technological laboratories. These in-
cluding the Pheonix laboratory, a
nuclear reactor,han automotive lab, the
space research facility, and various
other engineering and science research
labs.
The Institute of Science and
Technology, also on North Campus,
coordinates research activities bet-
ween University departments and
promotes research of specific interest
to the University, the Federal Gover-
nment, and the private sector.
"THE BENTLEY Library is another
unique feature of North Campus, and
the University's library system. Accor-
ding to Mary Jo Pugh, an archivist, the
library serves two basic purposes. Fir-
st, it is the archives of the University,
containing such off-beat items as old
course catalogues, student notes,
student diaries, and documents from all
corners of the campus.

The Gerald R. Ford Library, af-
filiated with the federal government
but on University land, is another ar-
chive library located on North Campus.
This library houses documents, letters
and diaries from former President
Ford, a University alumnus, and others
involved in his presidential ad-
ministration and throughout his career.
The Ford Library of course, also has
a few documents from the former
president's career as a center in the
football team while at the University.
University
growth is

"Bascially, the library is an ar-
chive," Pugh said. "All of these
materials are unique because there is
only one copy of everything here."
Secondly, the Bently also serves .as
the keeper of the Michigan Historical
Collection, a catalogued group of items
of historical significance to the State of
Michigan.
Interesting and otherwise
unavailable items in this collection in- i
clude the papers from the state's
governors and old legislative documen-
ts.

0

____a

THE NROTC COLLEGE PROGRAM.
$2,000 EXPENSE MONEY AND
A NAVY OFICER COMMISSION.
The two-year NROTC College Program offers you two years of expense
money that's worth up to $2,000, plus the challenge of becoming a
Navy Officer with early responsibilities and decision-making authority.
During your last two years in college the Navy pays for uniforms.
NROTC textbooks and an allowance of $100 a month for up to 20 months.
Upon graduation and completion of requirements. you become a
Navy Officer, with important decision-making responsibilities.
Call your Navy representative for more information on this
challenging program.
CONTACT LT. JOHN COSTELLO, NORTH HALL
764-1498
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.

0

Find out how you can
get involved.

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
"Health Care for the UM Campus Community".

reflected in
Ann .Arbor
(Continued from Page 2)
DURING THE short six-year term of
the next ptresident, Erastus Haven ac-
cepted two black students in 1868.
Although it was shortly after the Civil
War, no disruption occurred at the 4
University. The complete opposite
awaited another minority entry two
years later.
When"Henry Frieze became interim
president in 1869, he also made Univer-
sity history through the virtue of a
single admission. In 1870, Madelon
Stockwell became the first woman
enrolled in the University. Stockwell
Hall dormitory is named after her.
When Stockwell attended classes, the
male students pretended that she did
not exist. When they did notice her, they a
hooted her and called her names.
The University of Michigan became
the largest university in the country
during James Angell's 38-year term as
president. During the Angell years
which began in 1871, the University ex-
panded in student enrollment,
prestigious faculty members, and 50
campus buildings. The Michigan Union
was one of these buildings constructed
late in Angell's term. It helped students 4
meet without having to attend classes
together.
IN THE EARLY years of his term,
Angell knew many of the students by
first name basis. He and his wife
frequently invited students to the
President's House for a snack. Mrs.
Angell once even made chicken soup for
a student who was sick.
Angell gained the reputation as the
perfect university president during his
l1nc farm Wail li.--a y th e n .. n

Information for Students and Their Families:
Enrolled UM students are entitled to care through-
out each semester atno cost in most oftherclinics and
departments of the University Health Service, lo-
cated at 207 Fletcher Street (across from the Michi-
gan League). STUDENTS DO NOT RECEIVE FREE
CARE ATTHE UNIVERSITY OF MICH IGAN HOSPITALS
ORCTHEIR CLINICS.
SERVICES' Provided only at University Health

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1984
7:30 PM
KUENZEL ROOM, FIRST FLOOR
MICHIGAN UNION
mmS

Service -

COST

MEDICAL CLINICS....................... NONE
(apporntnrnts &" -rget o e" vsits
NURSE HEALTH AND TREATMENT
CENTERS...........................NONE
GYNECOLOGY CLINIC . .......... , . NONE
(fee for oco..alorescnrbed conastccpzn.s)
ALLERGY. CLINIC............NONE
(fees for Antigen)
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC.......:........ NONE
SPECIALTY CLINICS:
Dermatology, Neurology, Ear Nose
and Throat (ENT), Ophthalmology,
& Orthopedics........................NONE
(Medical Clinic er/oraL required)
EYE CARE CLINIC.......................Fees
(incuding contact lens fttngs)
NUTRITION COUNSELING.. NONE
(fen for rmaiariafs)
PSYCHIATRIC COUNSELING...............Fees
HEALTH EDUCATION..................NONE
(calf 763.1320 for programn fferngs and

-... Keep This By Your Telephone -
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
MEDICAL CLINIC HOURS"
September-April
Monday-Friday 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday 8:30 am - 12 :00 noon
Sunday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm.
(EMERGENCY' ONLY)
May-August
Monday-Friday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Full staff and services are not available during
Emergency hours; patients with non-emergency
problems maybe asked to schedule an appointment
to return.
Patients with medical emergencies when UHS is
closed may ail the UHS Nurse Health Center (763-
4511) or University Hospital Emergency Room (764-
5102) for information. UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
DOES NOT PAY FOR CARE RECEIVED AT UNI-
VERSITY HOSPITAL OR OTHER MEDICAL FACILITIES.
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
MEDICAL & SPECIALTY CLINIC
APPOINTMENTS ........... 764-8325
INFO HOTLINE....................... 764-320
*AFTER-HOURS EMERGENCIES........763-4511

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