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September 30, 1984 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-30

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The Michigan Daily - Sunday, September 30, 1984 -Poe 8

M'

downs improved Hoosiers

(Continued from Page 1)

Later, with 11 seconds remaining in the
second quarter, Bob Bergeron attempted a 47-
yard field goal. The ball fluttered in the brisk
wind and landed on the cross-bar, but bounced
back into the end zone.
THE HOOSIERS, not quite believing they
were leaving the field at halftime behind only 7-
0, came back in the third quarter with their of-
fense more polished.
Quarterback Steve Bradley moved Indiana
down to the Michigan 32 on his first drive but
was foiled by the coach's son, Mike Mallory.
The linebacker caught a ball that was tipped
straight up by safety Ivan Hicks along the
sidelines for a key interception.
From there, Michigan produced the pivotal
drive of the game, using up 10 minutes of the
clock and penetrating to the Indiana 4-yard
line.
ON THIRD-and-goal, Harbaugh threw into
the end zone for Rick Rogers and the ball was
batted away.
But after the play the referees held a con-
ference and gave Michigan the down over
because of an inadvertant whistle, leaving
most of the spectators puzzled..
On the next play, Harbaugh tossed a pass to
Eddie Garrett in the end zone and the Wolveri-
nes led 14-0.
"WHAT happened was, Rick (Rogers) was
just standing on the goal-line and the ball boun-
ced off his hands," explained Harbaugh. "The
official blew the whistle but (guard Bob)
Tabachino caught the ball before it hit the
ground. It was a bad break for them a lucky
break for us."
But both coaches didn't have quite as clear a
view of the play as Harbaugh.
"I can't understand how they called an inad-
vertant whistle on a pass," said Bill Mallory.
"God, that's an official's error and for us to suf-
fer for that, that just cuts you. Why should we
suffer for his mistake."
SAID BO Schembechler, "I thought (the of-
ficials) were back there debating how hard he
hit the kid on pass interference. I don't know
what happened."
What resulted though, was a Michigan
touchdown instead of a field goal try.
Indiana's ensuing drive ended with an inter-
ception by Andy Moeller, but when they

regained possession, they finally got some
points.
THE HOOSIERS quickly drove 80 yards,
Bradley leaping into the end zone from a yard
out with 9:05 left in the game. Mark Rogers
missed the point-after attempt wide right and
Indiana trailed 14-6.
Michigan then took the kickoff and called
time out at the line of scrimmage, Morris fum-
bled the ball to Indiana's Vince Fisher at the
Wolverine 34.
Bradley threw to flanker Terry Smith for a 12-
yard pickup and the Hoosiers appeared ready
to score again.
BUT ON second-and-8 at the 20, IU was called
for offensive pass interference. The play
proved very costly, moving the Hoosiers back
15 yards along with a loss of down. Mark
Rogers then missed a 47-yard field goal with
7:11 remaining and Indiana never got the ball
back.
"That was a big play," said Indiana's
Mallory of the pass interference call. "The ref
said our end pushed off the backer. Their
linebackers were knocking the pewilly dout of
our tight ends, and the tight ends were trying to
fight their way through. We got one of those
called."
The game ended with the Wolverine on the
Indiana three, having run out the final minute
with a 76-yard drive.
TAILBACK Gerald White, back from an in-
jury, picked up 41 of those yards on eight
carries, and Harbaugh hit Nelson with a clutch
pass for 19 yards on third-and-17 at the Hoosier
38 with just over three minutes remaining.
"It is disappointing," said Bradley, "in the
fact that our defense played a great game.
They've been fighting and fighting and finally
played a good game and the offense didn't
come through."
Schembechler must have felt good knowing
that after repeatedly saying how tough the
seemingly weak opponents really are, that he
was finally right.
"When you're in a situation," said Schem-
bechler, "you have to give the other team
credit. Everyone felt a blowout was possible.
"You see, all the teams are so even that you
can't make mistakes. Teams today are just too
good. Every game is going to be a tough game
- just ask Nebraska."

'M' offense dims .. .
.. .4D'sparks win
B LOOMINGTON - Yawn. The Wolverines beat Indiana
14-6. Ho hum.
Considering it was just last week that Northwestern
racked up 40 points against the Hoosiers, Michigan and
Indiana fans alike expected a Wolverine rout.
After all, how can a team so long downtrodden as Nor-
thwestern put 40 points on the scoreboard? Just recently,
the Wildcats would have rejoiced if that was all their op-
ponents scored against them.
So it would seem after a score like that against North-
western, the mighty 14th-ranked Wolverines would, well,
demolish the 0-3 Hoosiers.
Apparently the home town fans thought so. A mere
38,729 red-clad Indiana supporters strolled into Memorial
Stadium. But even mixed with a good number of the ever-
faithful Maize and Blue fans, they left more than 13,000
seats vacant.
Gosh, you would think that there would be.
enough Michigan fans in the state of Indiana that would
just want to see Michigan play regardless of the import of
the game. But they must have stayed home to watch the
televised games because the Hoosier athletic department
was left holding the tickets.
You can bet that those 13.000 no-shows are now wishing
they'd forked over the bucks for Michigan's visit. Had they
been here, they would have been treated to the closest
Michigan-Indiana score since the 27-21 Michigan victory in
Ann Arbor in 1979.
But fear not, all of you hoping to buy airline tickets to
Pasadena. The Wolverines are not quite out of the race
yet.
Michigan was not as bad as the 14-6 score would in-
dicate. In fact, Indiana looked pretty darned good in
places. Though the Hoosier offense failed to enter
Michigan territory until the third quarter, the defense did
the job.

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB,
Vince Bean hauls in a pass as Hoosier cornerback Jeff McBain reaches to break up the
play in the first quarter of yesterday's game. Bean had two receptions in the 14-6
Wolverine victory.

.. .our offense is
not designed to
score a ton of poin-
ts. We like to con-
trol the ball on of-
fense...'
-Jim Harbaugh

Blow goes for Bo

SCORING
MICHIGAN.......... .................7 0 7 0-14
Indiana ...................................0 0 0 6 .. 6
SCORING PLAYS
MICH-Perryman 2-yard run (Bergeron kick)
MICH-Garrett 4-yard pass from Harbaugh (Bergeron kick)
IND-Bradley 1-yard run (Kick failed)

RUSHING
MICHIGAN

Morris ..................
W hite ..................
Garrett..............
Harbaugh.............
Perryman............
Rogers...............

Att Yds
19 86
15 66
9 35
9 33
9 27
4 8

Avg
4.5
4.4
3,9
3.7
3.0
2.0

TD
0
0
0
0
0

PASSIN
MICHIGAN
Att Comp]
Harbaugh........ 18 14
INDIANA
Att Comp1
Bradley.......... 26 13

INDIANA
IG No Yd
Kenebrew.............3 59
Smith................ 4 40
Int Yrds TD Cook................. 1 12
0 135 1 Jones................ 1 11
Green................ 1 6
Caldwell.............. 1 5
Int Yrds TD Howard ..............1 4
3 141 0 Walsh............... 1 4
NG RETURNS

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

RECEIVI

First Downs........
Rushing (Att/Yrds) .
Net Passing Yards ...
Passing (Att/Comp/
Int( ............
Total Yards........
Fumbles (No/Lost)..
Punts (No/Avg) .....
Penalties (No/Yrds) .
Time of Possession ..

MICH
24
65/255
135
18/14/0
390
4/2
5/37.8
6/37
38:16

Ind
14
27/91
141

26/13/3
232
1/0
6/47.5
4/43
21:44

INDIANA
Att
Howard................ 12
0. Brown ................ 3
Walsh ................... 4
Green ................... 2
Caldwell................. 1
Bradley ................. 5

Yds
58
18
17
3
0
.5

Avg
4.8
6.0
4.3
1.5
0.0
-1.0

TD
0
0
0
0
0
1

Nelson ..............
Jokisch............
Bean..............
Morris ..............
Garrett..............
Kattus ..............
White.............

MICHIGAN
No
4
2
2
2
2
I
1

Yds
63
25
22
13
12
12
-2

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0

G. Johnson.
Garrett.......
Howard .........
Green ...........

MICHIGAN
Punts
No/Yds
3/38
INDIANA
Punts
No/Yds

Kickoffs
No/Yds
1/8
Kickoffs
No/Yds
1/17
2/27

'M' COACH DEFENDS TEAM'S PERFORMANCE:
Schembechler satisfied; gives IU credit

"They (Indiana) are vastly improving each week," said
Bo Schembechler after the game. "I was impressed with
" their offense and very impressed with their defense."
The Hoosiers. must have prepared well for the
Wolverines because it would seem that no Michigan
team, no matter how poorly it played, could only muster
less than half of the points that Northwestern did against
the same Indiana team. At leat it would seem that way.
Quarterback Jim Harbaugh had other thoughts.
"Northwestern and Michigan are two different teams,"
he said. "We know we have a great defense and that the
opponent is not going to score a lot of points. So our offense
is not designed to score a ton of points. We like to control
the ball on offense, and win by playing tough defense"
Well, he should know, he is the head honcho. But what
many fail to realize is that while the Wildcats' offense did
explode, so did Indiana's. It scored a hefty 37 points
against Northwestern's defense.
Hoosier quarterback Steve Bradley prior to yesterday's
game was ranked second in the nation for total offense,
averaging 310 yards. He is second only to Boston College's
Doug Flutie, a likely Heisman Trophy candidate.
First-year Indiana coach Bill Mallory definitely has his
offense in gear. Until yesterday, the fewest points his of-
fense managed was 14 (against Kentucky's 48). Going into
yesterday's game Indiana's offense was averaging 25
points a game, which says something for the Michigan
defense.
The Hoosier offense did not come alive until the third
quarter. The longest drive of the game for Indiana was a
15-play march leading to the sole touchdown. But the drive
took only 5:43 out of the clock and Michigan continued to
dominate the possession time by more than 16 minutes.
Okay, so we all know that Michigan has a good defense.
But the question still remains as to, why the offense could
only score two touchdowns against an undeniably weaker
Indiana squad.
But that answer remains to be seen. Harbaugh is con-
tinuing to improve, completing 14 of his 18 throws. But
that's not going to be enough in the coming weeks as
Michigan takes on the bigger boys of the Big Ten. Indiana
should just have been a tune-up for much rougher roads
ahead.

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
Special to the Daily
BLOOMINGTON - Bo Schembechler was
not bubbling with excitement yesterday at
the conclusion of Michigan's 14-6 Big Ten
victory over Indiana, but the coach was
satisfied.
Schembechler was satisfied first and
foremost with the conference victory.
Michigan is now 2-0 innthe Big Tenvand 3-1
overall.
SCHEMBECHLER was also satisfied
with the play of his defense. He saw the
Wolverine defense force six Hoosier punts,
make three interceptions, and stop Indiana
in the fourth quarter after Michigan had
fumbled the ball at its 30-yard line. At the
time, the Wolverines held a precarious 14-6
advantage.-
The General was satisfied with his offen-
sive unit, which ran the ball 65 times, com-
pleted 14 of 18 passes and controlled the ball
for 38:16 of the game.
In fact, Michigan's 16-year head coach
was satisfied with everything pertaining to
the actual gridiron battle. He would have
liked to light up the scoreboard a little more,
but he admitted that Indiana's fine play
prevented such an occurence.
ONLY ONE aspect of yesterday's game
proved dissatisfying to Schembechler - the
press.
"Indiana played well, give them credit,"
said Schembechler, forced to the defensive.
But some lusty reporters still weren't
satisfied. If Indiana is so horrible, why

couldn't the Wolverines cruise to a blowout?
"WHAT YOU want me to say is that
Michigan played bad," yelled Schem-
bechler. "Well, if you want to write that, you
can go to hell, because I'm not going to say
that. Indiana played well."
The Hoosiers did play well. They played to
their capabilities by playing hard the whole
game and by not making costly mistakes.
"I have a lot of respect for Michigan
because they went out and took it to us,"
said Hoosier head coach Bill Mallory. "But I
thought we went out and took it to them."
INDIANA took it to Michigan as best it
could and fell short because of a lack of
talent, not desire. The Hoosiers went up
against a Wolverine team that is starting to
round into midseason form.
Michigan's goal yesterday was to con-
tinue to improve on all aspects of it's play,
especially the offensive line. And the line
came through with a satisfactory perfor-
mance.
Michigan gained 259 yards rushing on four
yards . To keep the Hoosier defense on its
toes, Jim Harbaugh went to the air 18 times
and recorded 14 completions for 135 yards,
one touchdown and no interceptions.
"HE'S STARTING to read my moves bet-
ter and we're getting our timing down pat,"
said Wolverine tight end Sim Nelson, who
caught four Harbaugh aerials for 63 yards. "I
think he's going to be one of the best (quar-
terbacks) around in years to come. He's

progressing each week and each day in
practice."
All told, Michigan's offense totalled 390
yards and sustained drives of 15, 19 and 14
plays. The Wolverines ran out the final 7:11
of the game on their final drive.
Defensively Michigan wassomething bet-
ter than satisfactory. Indiana ran off only 53
plays to Michigan's 83. The Hoosier ground
game netted a paltry 91 yards on 27 carries
and heralded quarterback Steve Bradley
completed 13 of 26 passes for 141 yards and
three interceptions.
MIKE MALLORY was the leader in
subduing the Hoosiers, making nine tackles
and grabbing an interception. Kevin Brooks
and Mike Hammerstein played strong
games, with each recording a sack. And
freshman Erik Campbell emerged as a for-
ce in the secondary by making six tackles
from his free safety position.
"You're just not going to see as many0
blowouts anymore" said Mike Mallory,
echoing the sentiments of Schembechler.L
"We knew it would be a tough game, that
they would come out and fight. I knew it
would be tight at the end. It's characteristic
of my dad's team to fight back."
Schembechler, Mallory and the entire ,
Wolverine lockerroom were excited by the
14-6 victory. They knew Indiana was gun-

ning for a big upset. "We went out to play,
to win that play game," said a dejected Bill
Mallory, Indiana's first-year head coach.
Schembechler was only too happy to point
out that Nebraska fell to Syracuse, and that
both Pittsburgh and Alabama were losers
yesterday and that the Panthers are winless
this season.
The killings of the past will not be as
frequent. Each triumph is exciting, fulfilling,
and to Schembechler, satisfying.

Blue Banter

*Freshman Erik Campbell saw extensive
action at free safety, where he replaced the
injured Tony Gant. "(Campbell's) a good
player," said teammate Garland Rivers.
"Right now, we've only got one experienced
player in the backfield, Brad Cochran, but
we're confident that we can do the job."

rushing for 82 yards in the first half. But the
freshman tallied only four yards in the last 30
minutes as Gerald White saw most of the
playing time at tailback. Morris now has 304
yards on the season.
eDefensive back Ivan Hicks made his first
start as a collegiate. He is the brother of for-

Big Ten Standings

Conference
w 1 I

Overall
w t.

*~xz Nx

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