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September 06, 1984 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 6, 1984 -Page A-7

Student fights
:to get degree
back from 'U'

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*,

"Gimmea D
Gimme an A
Gimmean I...L...Y
Givethe MICHIGAN DAILY
that old college try.
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription

By ERIC MATTSON
For most students, receiving a
degree from the University signals the
end of a long, arduous journey. But for
W one student it was only the beginning.
-In 1980, Wilson Crook had his 1977
Master of Science degree rescinded by
the regents after a disciplinary panel
decided that he had falsified data in his
thesis.
CROOK appealed the decision.
charging that he had not been afforded
his constitutional right of due process.
U.S. District Court Judge Anna Diggs
Taylor agreed with Crook and ordered
the University to return Crook's degree
in Geology and Minerology.
Prof. Donald Peacor, who initiated
the investigation into Crook's thesis,
said "there is absolutely no doubt in my
mind that virtually everything in his
thesis was falsified . .. in my view, the
judge made a ridiculous decision."
The University is currently appealing
Taylor's decision and it could be a year
or more before the issue is resolved.
SPENDING RESOLUTION of the
.matter, the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of
Appeals issued an injunction allowing
the University to withhold Crook's
diploma.
In his thesis, Crook claimed to have
discovered a new mineral, "Texasite,"
which was later found to resemble a
synthetic compound missing from a
professor's lab.
But the issue in court was not whether
Crook had fabricated his data; it was
1h whether the University had given Crook

due process.
JUDGE TAYLOR blasted the
University for "the inquisitorial, cir-
cus-like free-for-all which constituted
(Crook's) 'hearing,' " and said Crook
was not given adequate notice of the
charges and evidence against him.
Further, Diggs said, Crook's lawyer
was not allowed to participate
meaningfully in the hearing and the
regents did not see any evidence-they
merely acted upon the recommen-
dation of the disciplinary committee.
The arbitrary recission of a degree,
after a university has supposedly
determined with all due deliberation
that one has met all of the requirements
for that degree, damages the univer-
sity's academic integrity as much as, if
not more than, the student's fraud in
obtaining that degree," Diggs wrote.
But University General Counsel
Roderick Daane disputed Diggs'
decision. "I think she's just flat
wrong," he said.
Daane said although the University
did not afford Crook the due process he
would have received in court, the
procedure the disciplinary committee
followed was entirely fair.
Crook's Detroit attorney, George
Bushness, said the University's hearing
showed a "lack of fair play that would
be afforded any individual."
As to the allegation that Crook did in-
deed fabricate his data, Bushnell
refused to comment. "That's just a
goddamn dumb question," he said.

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Former President Gerald Ford kicks off the University's drive to raise $160
million from alumni and private corporations last October.
University leans on
alumni to raise funds

f
5

o-Al

Kelly set to appeal
'82 murder conviction

By ERIC MATTSON
More than three years after the Bur-
sley Hall shooting which left two
students dead, convicted murderer
Leo Kelly is appealing his guilty ver-
dict.
Kelly was convicted in July 1982 of
killing freshman Edward Siwik and
Douglas McGreaham, a resident ad-
visor, on a sixth floor Bursley hallway
where all three were residents. The
conviction carried a mandatory sen-
tence of life in prison.
BUT KELLY'S attorney, Chokwe
Lumumba, says his client did not
receive a fair trial.
According to Lumumba, the all-white

jury was racially biased. "In other
words, they screwed all the black
people," he said.
LUMUMBA cited pre-trial publicity
as another basis for the Kelly appeal.
According to the attorney, his client's
trial should have been moved outside
Washtenaw County.
But the prosecuting attorney Lyn-
wood Noah said the proceedings were
entirely fair and equitable.
"I don't think there was any real
prejudice in the jury's mind," he said.
If the lower court's decision is rever-
sed, the case will be retried. The court
has not yet announced when it will ren-
der a verdict.

By MARLA GOLD
When students run out of ready cash
they turn to their parents to bail them
out. The University is trying a similar
approach to raise money which
President Harold Shapiro said can't be
generated from tuition increases or
state aid.
"Campaign for Michigan," the of-
ficial name of the eighteen month-old
drive by the University to raise $160
million for colleges, faculty endowmen-
ts, and building projects, is a plea to
this institution's 250,000 alumni to
donate money or other gifts needed to
keep tuition down and the quality of the
University high.
THE CAMPAIGN kicked off officially
on October 14, 1983, after having raised
$46 million from individuals and cor-
porations.
Among the corporations who have
donated money or gifts to the Univer-
sity include a $5 million donation by the
Ford Motor car company, Burroughs,
General Motors, Chase-Manhattan
Bank, Chrysler, K Mart, and Michigan
Bell telephone.
The fundraising attempt was initially
aimed at regional areas, said Cosovich,
who was hired specifically to head the
fundraising campaign.
"THE UNIVERSITY has to have
significant endorsement displayed by
local people before going on a nation-
wide campaign," he said.
In the regent's July report, donations
were listed at $62 million, which
Cosovich thinks is right on schedule.
The campaign is scheduled to end in
1987.
He added that the fundraiser is not
merely intended to raise revenue, but
also to "raise the level of awareness of
alumni" so that they will continue to
donate funds in the future, long after
the formal campaign is over.
THE HIGH priority areas for fun-
draising include the humanities and the
chemistry departments, with a large
percentage of the funds going for
building renovations throughout the

campus, including;
" $20 million to update and enlarge the
chemistry building;
9 $15 million for additions to the
business administration building, in
cluding a new library and computer
system;
* $9.5 million for the Kellog Eye Cen-
ter;
" and $1.4 million to build a slide library
onto Tappan Hall for the Art History
Department.
So far the business school, Kellogg
Eye Center and the Tappan Hall ad-
ditions are the closest to reaching their
goals.
In addition, different colleges in-
cluding the art school and the School of
Natural Resources, which received
major budget cuts as part of the
University's five-year plan to trim
costs from various parts of the Univer-
sity, are "taking advantage of the cam-
paign umbrella," Cosovich said by
working with it to raise badly needed
money.
Although the largest gifts to the cam-
paign are from major corporations,
Cosovich said, "In any effort of this
kind, most of the gifts come from in-
dividuals. People provide well over one-

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half of the money." He added that 85
percent of the gifts come from aboutO CIT IZEN
five percent of the people.
Cosovich, who has previously done
similar fundraisers for large private w
institutions across the country, said N
that "Campaign for Michigan" is the om
largest fund raising campaign ever at a En.
public institution. s..
Because of his expertise in fun-
draising, and the importance of his job,
Cosovich is the highest paid vice
president, and even makes more than
the University president.
Although the end of the fundraiser is
three years and one hundred million
dollars away from its final goal, Cosovi-
ch is confident that the goal will be
reached.
"I think it is within the capability of
this institution."

(Continued from Page 2)
the International Center, which has
been doing its best with its limited
resources," said Ema Ema, a Nigerian
doctoral student in communication.
ACCORDING TO Ema, foreign
students have tried for months to
arrange a meeting with University
President Harold Shapiro to discuss the
problems foreign students face here on
campus.

Ema, a member of the Michigan
Student Assembly's Foreign Student
Advisory Board and the International
Center's Foreign Student Council, said
that students are pushing for a social
orientation program to introduce
foreign students to American culture.
"We want the International Center to
have a major status on campus," Ema
said.

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