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September 06, 1984 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STUDENTS WANT DEFENSE RESEARCH OFF CAMPUS

Milita
By PETE WILLIAMS
Yes, Virginia, the University does do
research for the Department of Defen-
se. And the University does pocket
millions of dollars a year for perfor-
ming experiments ranging from
microwave research to radar
technology .
The research is controversial and
opinions and attitudes have clashed
more than once. Some oppose the
'research because it can be used to wage
wars. Others, however, believe that
:'Professors should have the freedom to
orsue any type of research they
ihoose.
; THE ARGUMENT basically boils
down to whether or not the University is
the place for research that may help
destroy life and whether or not faculty
iembers have the right to investigate
liny subject regardless of its im-
olications.
The Progressive Student Network is'
at the forefront of the anti-military
research debate. Members of this ac-
' fivist group have vehemently opposed
the research. According to Chris Hil, a
-;ESN member, people on campus don"t
>64ealize the dangers involved with
Imilitary research.
"People have a distorted vision of
'what goes on in engineering buildings,"
Hill said. "They are not doing just basic
research. It is applied weapons resear-
ch."
LAST FALL, a group of PSN mem-
bers including Hill participated in two-
sit-ins at laboratories in the East
Engineering building. The group
claimed that the research done in these
labs, which is funded in whole of in part
by the defense department, was
morally reprehensible. They wanted it
stopped.
stElectrical and Computer
Engineering Prof. Thomas Senior,
whose laboratory was the subject of

ry research stirs debate

a PSN sit-in last fall, said he thought the
act was an unfortunate occurrence,
and that PSN's opinions could have
been made known through better
means.
"I had talked with and met most of
the individuals involved. I knew them,
and though I didn't always agree with
their intentions, these are people I
respect," he said. Senior said although
most of the protesters' hearts were in
the right place, they are "extremely
misguided" in their actions.

proved the new guidelines as did
several other organizations on campus.
The regents, however, rejected the
guidelines in a 7-2 decision saying that
they were an unnecessary infringement
on an individual professor's academic
freedom.
Senior agreed with the regents'
decision. "Guidelines are very
dangerous," he said. "Although you
implement them for moral reasons, on-
ce you start doing that. . . there is no
end."

'People have a distorted vision of what goes
on in engineering buildings. They're not
just doing basic research. It is applied
weapons research.'
-Chris Hill
PSN member

seen constraints on the freedom of
researchers.
"Freedom of research is a fairly new
idea," Aranoff said. "Now the ad-
ministration makes it seem like it has
always been that way-and it hasn't."
SENIOR SAID that he would find it
hard to believe that any professor at the
University was doing direct or applied
weapons research but that, arguably,
every professor in the School of
Engineering is involved indirectly in
military research. He added any ad-
vancement in the areas of engineering
or electronics can be applied to the
military, and the defense department
does not have to give out defined and
specific weapons related projects in or-
der to reap the benefits of the advan-
cements.
"The reason research is done at
universities is so professors can get
published," he said. "If you get into ap-
plied weapons research, none of that is
publishable. I don't see how the Depar-
tment of Defense, in all their wisdom,
could allow that type of research to be
published."
But for other University researchers,
the issue is not so clear cut. Prof.
Isadore Bernstein, who has been
criticized for defense department work
with chemicals-including the effects
of mustard liquid on the human skin-
said he is caught in a no win situation.
"War is definitely something we
don't want to do, but we shouldn't sit
back and allow out nation to become
subservient to another philosophy," he
said. "On the other hand, I believe the
University is not a place where
machines of war should be developed.
"There just isn't a black and white
answer. Maybe Tom Senior has a clear-
cut answer," Bernstein said. "Maybe
the people who are anti-war-and I
don't believe they are anti-military
research, I believe they are really anti-
war-have the answer, but I don't."

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September6b, 1984 - page 11
ACACIA
Cfe iebrating our 80th1 Annt'versarv.
805 (Ixforb
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Ft N l..UE A SI
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Your Campus Grocery Store
1352 GEDDES
(At Observatory -near the Hill Dorms)

IN 1972, THE University implemen-
ted guidelines covering classified
research projects. The guidelines state,
in part, that the University will not take
part in any research, ". . . the specific
purpose of which is to destroy human
life or incapacitate human beings." In
1982, there was an attempt to extend
those guidelines to include unclassified
as well as classified research.
The governing body of the faculty ap-

ACCORDING TO SENIOR, once one
research project is stopped for moral
reasons, there is nothing to prevent
other projects from being stopped for
another group's moral reasons. Before
long, he said, all research freedom is
gone.
Nancy Aranoff, another member of
PSN, disagrees with Senior's
assessment. She said there have always

HILL DORMS
SOUTH 'U'

GEDDES

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k

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Guardian Angels plan on coming to campus

41.
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*Beer & Wine
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By LISA POWERS
The city could get some divine inter-'
vention in the fight against crime this
fall if the Detroit chapter of the Guar-
dian Angels decides to go ahead with
tentative plans to establish an Ann Ar-
bor group.
"There's always been an interest to
get established in Ann Arbor," said
Curtis Sliwa, founder of the New York
based organization.
SLIWA SAID last lune the well-
publicized student unrest that charac-
terized the 60s, the city's high crime
rate and its proximity to Detroit makes
Ann Arbor a good candidate for the
volunteer group.
According to Sliwa, the Guardian
Angels plan to make a public presen-
tation to students this fall in order to
explain the organization and possibly to
sign-up volunteers.
Sliwa described the Alliance of Guar-
dian Angels, Inc. as a "service group
'In-state
tuition
frozen
(Continued from Page 1)
move.
Sarah Power (D-Ann Arbor) called
the freeze "an act of faith." She added
that it was a "clear signal to Lansing,
we are sensitive to what the voices in
Lansing are trying to do."
Shapiro agreed with Power. "I think
that there is a good chance that at-
titudes toward funding of higher
education is going through a tran-
sition," he said.
Last year, tuition went up an average
of 9.5 percent. In 1982, it jumped an
average of 15 percent and in 1981
students received an 18 percent in-
crease in tuition costs.
KAPPA
SIGMA
FRATERNITY
Welcomes You to
The University of
Michigan for the
'84-'85 Academic Year.
%A/C [IIVITC '%/f I T

that particularly is ... patrolling the
city and acting as a visual deterrent
toward crime. Part of the program is
escorting, sure, but we don't have
people who just sit in the dorm and wait
for a call to come in. If somebody's in
need of an escort. . . we'll already be
out there."
WEARING T-shirts and berets, and
carrying an identification card that
certifies that each member underwent
three months of training, the Guardian
Angels would patrol the city in groups
of two or more, Sliwa said.
"If, in the course of patrol, we should
see a crime in process," said Sliwa,
"we would intervene and hold them un-
til the police arrive. That is a citizen's
arrest.'
"As a citizen, you have the right to
detain a person but if you try to move
him against his will then you are

violating his rights, and he, in turn, can
have you arrested," Sliwa said.
THE CONVICTION rate for people
arrested by Guardian Angels is better
than that of most police departments,
Sliwa said. Out of 168 citizen's arrests
the group has made in incidents where
guns or knives were used, convictions
and prison terms of six months or more
were received in 89 of them.
"Never once has a Guardian Angel
been arrested for improper detention or
using force," Sliwa said.
Two Guardian Angels escort services
have been started on the campuses of
Ohio State and Northwestern Univer-
sities.
THE GROUP has met a great deal of
opposition when trying to start chapters
in other cities, much of the opposition
coming from law enforcement agencies
who see the Angels as a vigilante group.

Sliwa said he will make a public
presentation to students this fall even
if he meets stiff opposition from
University officials. "We're used to it,"
he said.
The structure of the Ann Arbor chap-
ter will not be formulated until Sliwa
and the Detroit members evaluate the
needs of the campus and the com-
munity, and most importantly, get feed-
back from the community, Sliwa said.
"It is the decision of the students,"
said Sliwa. "They woii't be forced."

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