100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 11, 1984-- Page 5
Reagan wins over black leader

WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Reagan's personal charm worked at
least partially yesterday to persuade a
critical black religious leader that he
will do "some of the things we asked" to
improve economic opportunities for
blacks.
Reagan met with six leaders of the 7-
million-member National Baptist Con-
vention in the Oval Office after its
president, -the Rev. T.J. Jemison,
criticized him publicly last week at the
group's meeting.
ASKED IF he had softened his view
during the meeting, Jemison said,
"Well, once you see a man personally
and talk with him personally, views
that you have when you don't know him
personally - you do have different
points of view."
The president was continuing his
drive to win over minority and white

ethnic voters this week with a speech to
about 240 Hispanic leaders on the oc-
casion of his singing of a proclamation
marking Hispanic Heritage Week.
The drive began Sunday with
Reagan's visit to a Polish Catholic
shrine in Doylestown, Pa., and was to

continue later in the week when the
president campaigns among Polish-and
Italian-Americans.
Jemison, who supported Jesse
Jackson in the Democratic primaries,
told his group's annual meeting last

week: "I don't believe the present ad-
ministration feels the heart-beat, they
desires, the concerns of black people...
I don't believe our nation under the
present leadership will move us into the:
mainstream of American life."

Mondale details deficit program

(Continued from page 1)
THE CUTS include $25 billion from
Reagan's defense buildup; $12 billion
from a plan to hold down health care in-
creases; and $4 billion from farm
programs.
The $30 billion in add-ons would go for
programs such as education, the en-
vironment and school lunches.

The balance of the deficit plan en-
visions savings of $51 billion in lower in-
terest costs on the national debt, the
result of a presumed decrease in in-
terest rates, and another $17 billion
resulting from a healthier economy.
In all, Mondale's plan would trim $177
billion from what thesCongressional
Budget office estimates would other-

wise be a dificit of $263 billion.
To reduce spending, Mondale would
eliminate most of the big weapons
urged by Reagan, including the MX
multi-warhead missile, the B-1 long-
range bomber and "Star Wars"
proposals for development of satellites
as launching platforms for nuclear
weapons.

Associated Press
Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale, right, and Philadelphia
Mayor W. Wilson Goode tour the Pennsylvania City during a campaign stop.

Council nixes lenient scalping rule

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
The Ann Arbor City Council last night defeated a proposal
to decriminalize ticket scalping by a vote of six to four.
If passed, the measure would have made ticket scalping
punishable by a five dollar fine instead of the state's steeper
puinishment of a $100 fine and 90 days in jail.
"(TICKET SCALPING has) been going on for about 100
years and will probably go on for another 100, said Mayor Lou
Belcher, who voted against the proposal.
Belcher added, however, that the proposal would not have
I given community members free access to sought-after foot-
ball tickets. Professional ticket scalping rings deplete access
to tickets, he said.
- But if passes, the proposal which was sponsored by Coun-
cilmember James Blow (R-Second Ward) would have en-
titled the city police to also enforce the state's penalties if

large numbers of tickets were being re-sold.
COUNCIL member Larry Hunter (D-First Ward), who
voted in favor of the proposal, told council members that
students often scalp footbal tickets in order to enjoy events
such as trips home. "I think there's nothing in the world
that's wrong with that," he said. "That may be the initial
problem that we are trying to regulate... do we really need a
law?" Hunter said.
Hunter labeled ticket scalping "free enterprise" and said it
does not cause problems in the streets of Ann Arbor.
The only way to limit ticket scalping, said councilmember
Dick Deem (R-Second Ward), is for the University to request
student identification at football games.
Although this proposal was defeated, Belcher said he would
support an ordinance with a' slightly higher fine of $25
because scalpers would be taking a loss by paying the $25.

highlight ,
andUw
~ quick as a "flash
more than just a highlighter
Switch from highlighting to jotting notes without changing pens. Textar
comes in six bright fluorescent colors, each with a blue ballpoint pen.

Available now at your college store.

Lobsters

race for
needed
research
(Continued from page 1)
squirt guns, flashlights and whisks to
* egg the athletes on, and the race began.
Two minutes and 10 seconds later, the
winning lobster, sponsored by Goldstar
Products and jockied by Ted Heusel of
WAAM radio, crossed the finish line to
the roar of the convivial crowd.
The race, held as a benefit for the
Michigan Eye Bank, was the brainchild
of Gandy Dancer general manager
Kurt Romans. Romans supervised the
event in a blue bowtie dotted with white
lobsters.
ROMAN organized similar races to
benefit the American Cancer Society.
four years ago in Cleveland, Ohio and
this year he decided to bring the idea to
Ann Arbor.
With the help of the Ann Arbor Lion's
Club and 17 local businesses, a race was
organized. Each business contributed
$100 to sponsor a lobster and local
celebrities, including University
Medical School Dean James Taren and
former Michigan football player Bill
M Dufek, contributed their time as lobster
jockies.
The event raised $1,800 for the eye
bank. The money will be used to help
build a research center in the Univer-
sity's W.K. Kellogg Eye Center. The
eye bank, which does not receive many
benefits of this kind, spends $60,000
each year for corneal preservation and
processing, aiding the return of vision
to the blind.
-SPONSOR BILL Bolgos of Bolgos Ice
Crean in Pittsfield Township said he
thought the event was very well-
rounded although he was not pleased
with his lobster's performance.
"I think my lobster was drugged,"
Bolgos said. "It would only sit in a cor-
ner."$
Although most of the other lobsters
looked more energetic than Bolgos', the
judge assured the crowd that steroids
were prohibited.
After the bleachers had cleared and
the lobsters had met their fate - a place
on next week's menu - Becky Keller of
Albin Business Copiers summarized the
affair: 'A good cause, a good time."
The Gandy Dancer, in cooperation
with the Lions' Club, is hoping to raise
nearly $5,000 more through the Great
Lobster Raffle. Tickets, costing one
dollar each, are available through
October 13 and can be used as a dollar-
off coupon for the restaurant. The win-
ner will receive a 25-pound lobster and
dinner for 10 at the Gandy Dancer.
Barbara Gilbert filed a report for
this story.
764-0558

WHAT EVERY STUDENT
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN LEASING A TELEPHONE AND
LEASING .A CHICKEN..

.---
r .;
G ,
U
_

-e 1 44

r-

Tt'
-

I

44

.
7 .

i

Yes, there are differences.
And we think yOu should
know what they are.
Ask yourself these
questions.
WHEN YOU LEASE A -
CHICKEN, DO YOU
GET THREE MONTHS
FREE DURING
THE SUMMER?
Probably not. But when
you lease your telephone
from AT&T this fall, you won't

y' ARE LEASED CHICKENS
SHIPPED DIRECTLY
TO YOU? -
Ship a chicken? Don't be
silly. However, your AT&T
leased telephone will be
shipped directly to you after
one call to 1-800-555-8111,

1 5

IF

-1

fi

pay any lease charges next summer.
You can use your phone at home, and
bring it back to school in the fall.
DO LEASED CHICKENS COME IN A_
SELECTION OF COLORS AND STYLES?
No. Chickens don't come in many colors.
But the AT&T telephone you lease
this fall comes in a variety of
colors and three popular styles.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS
REPAIRED FREE?-
Don't kid yourself. Repairing a chicken is a delicate
process that requires the work of expensive professionals.
However, in the off chance your AT&T leased telephone

r --
... ,-
._
1

or you can pick up your
phone at any of our AT&T
Phone Centers.
ONE FINAL QUESTION: DOES
IT COST THE SAME TO LEASE
A CHICKEN AS TO LEASE A
TELEPHONE THIS FALL?
Hardly. While we have no hard data
on the exact cost of leasing a chicken,
we can tell you with some certainty that
the cost of leasing a telephone this fall
is far less than you might think.
The decision to lease a chicken or a
telephone, of course, rests with you.
But should you opt for the tele-
phone, remember: you get three
months free next summer, and you can take
the phone home with you. There's a choice
of colors and styles, free repair, and
we'll ship you the phone or you can pick
it up at any of our AT&T Phone Centers.
It doesn't cost much either. And

that's something to crow about.
AT&T Consumer Sales and
Service. To order your telephone, call

..........

I

- > _

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan