100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 1984 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

---U-- -~

. ,

w

--
qpL

_.

C 7-'EP

Selected

Work

S

Be

S

t

kt, . , .. "....r , R +.. ,.. .. ., : . ,r .? .. .......fit .. ,.,... ,...:. . ..:......: .... .............,...-.....
. . .... . . . . . . . ......*........ ....... .............?. . . . . . . ............ *.".*,..,..."...x...............,........,:,:..,......,...,. h,.~.y.ii":::n"v"v: .:"::: ~ ..:,:

.v::::::..,} ."."....: :v:-}:. ::. }X:i{v:::::: \v :: ......:: ..: :v:: ::::::Yip :4X":{":{.}};: }};4 "}.4:i"}}:'ti"..". .. r}'v f.......???:i"?.??:?::::: ;:::?}:}}: - :}}:":: Yr:'i h.:.... ......{. ....... . .. ..r .. .. v. .k.. v. ... :.+.:....:.. t....
...............v........v..:......4:. ...... ...... r.............. .... . .............. n.....v............. v .. v. ..k.. ... -krv'"r: "": ":..:
.........v..........v..r..v .................. :.. ::.:. . _.:::.: }....,..,.,.,., :.,.,.. v..v.x:": .. :. hnv: "x:.vv. ...{v.A..".n kvv: ::":: ::::. :..".-.:-..: .....--:: .... v.vvr v. v".r ...vv:L:"}:":ti'"i'.:}}: .r._.....:-:::v:v::::.".-::::.v:..-.......... i.,.
".w::: n"n .......:........ r{..1......................... ... r.."::. ..n..v:.s".;.;.;:.-.vv"J.^v iv:4::}:{::4: }::.".{:v:::xriv:.4 }} <'.nxvvv. v.{xv.vA:v{::::.x ti is{{i:%: $:"::v}:::.:'tiik :ti :':.v}:"i

Dropping pumpkins

By David M. Stein gold
Rich
"We got nothing to do on Halloween
anymore. We don't go out anymore, you
know, too old. So Smitty said let's go for
a ride, hit kids or something. He was
kidding, I mean."
Sheriff Carlton
"Usually we expect something like
this on Halloween. Not a kid getting
shot, of course, but some trouble. The
night before is bad, too."
Farmer Kelley
"These punks come by my house
every year, and they soap up the win-
dows, and throw eggs at my dogs. This
town don't do anything about
delinquents. I don't like taking the law
into my own hands. I don't like to do
something like that."
Rich
"Mike asked if Smitty's dad minded
us taking the camper. Smitty said he
wasn't going to ask, you know, to use it.
His dad had to stay home to give out
candy, I mean."
Sheriff Carlton
"It was quiet the whole evening, up to
the time I got the call from theV&C. I
wasn't surprised at the call. I couldn't
understand why it was so quiet."
Farmer Kelley
"They cut one of my dog's ears with
an eggshell. They thinks it's funny,
mutilating a man's dogs."
Rich
"Nothing was happening around the
neighborhood, out on the streets. We
couldn't go to a party, even though most
of us was invited, because Mike wasn't
in school, and nobody invited him."
Sheriff Carlton
"Sometimes I really hate my job.

This town has a big problem with kids,
and nobody knows what to do about it. I
have to take a lot of responsibility."
Farmer Kelley
"I bought my rifle to shoot deer. I go
over to Brennan's Woods, and shoot
deer. I've been using a gun since I was
13.1 keep it loaded all season."
Rich
"We went to the V&C Grocery. Smitty
said he was'going to buy some beer. We
got in a fight about having no ID. Mike
said skip the beer. We can take some
pumpkins (they got pumpkins out front
of the V&C, for Halloween) that's left
over, and throw them off the old quarry
cliff. So we just picked them up, and put
them in the back of the camper. Nobody
ever saw, I mean."
Sheriff Carlton
"The first call was sort of a relief.
Kids stealing pumpkins. I was hoping
that would fill the night's quota. I sent
out of Peterson, but I knew there was
nothing we could do."
Farmer Kelley
"I grow pumpkins, yeah. But that's
what was growing on the farm when I
bought it. They don't take up too much
of my time. Kind of like a hobby, like
hunting. And I sell them to the stores in
October.'
Rich
"We threw all the V&C pumpkins off
the quarry cliff. Smitty and Vince were
down at the bottom, and they watched
them hit. It was great. Mike and me
didn't have enough pumpkins."
Sheriff Carlton
"I don't have any kids. In this town,
it's not worth the risk. Besides, I'm
already like a father now, with all the
dropouts I have to keep an eye on. Mike
Parker was a dropout."
Farmer Kelley
"My pumpkins don't bring in a lot of

Long
play
By ByronL. Bull
7THE YEAR IN music has had its
share of surprises. Some of
them were bad; Pete Townshend broke
up The Who, The English Beat broke
themselves up, while the Clash kicked
Mick Jones out who promptly recruited
previously expelled Topper Headon,
and formed their own band, called (and
the lawyers have just begun to fight)
The Clash. The Rolling Stones, mean-
while, have shown no sign of breaking
up.
Warren Zevon was dropped from his
label. Yet bleach-blonde Sting, a
songwriter of little depth, wrote an
album of cheap Psych 101 references
and pathetically self-pitying con-
fessionals about his divorce, that young
girls just ate up. Michael Jackson, that
one-dimensional plastic eunich of cor-
porate PR machinery convinced
Rolling Stone he was a consumate ar-
tist and continued to sell millions of
records. Fittingly, he also became the
ultimate celebrity whore, turning one of
his own hits into a Pepsi jingle.
Lastly, techno-pop continues to
thrive. The instrument of the decade,
the synthesizer, grew even more
sophisticated as those who relied upon
it ( Talk to me, like lovers do. Walk
to me, like lovers do)grew less so.
. 1

money, but everyone says they're
bigger than any other pumpkins around
Dowagiac. People call them Kelleys,
like MacIntosh apples. I get women
coming to buy pumpkins all fall, even
after Halloween, for pies and such. And
like I said, the stores buy some too."
Rich 4
"Smitty said there was a pumpkin
patch he'd seen on the road to the
quarry, and we could get some more
pumpkins there. We were joking on the
way about the Great Pumpkin, you
know, like Charlie Brown. It sounded
like fun, so we went out there."'
Sheriff Carlton
"I was about to go out and get some
coffee. I thought this year it would be
quiet after all."
Farmer Kelley
"When my dogs started barking, I

r

I _________ g

vrrAi.4[F

ECKRICH slender sliced meats
COCA COLA products y. litres
(thru April 23)
GRANNY SMITH APPLE S e.
31b bags IDA RED apples
%gallons MILK
HAAGEN DAZS pints
11oz CHIPS AHOY
OozWHEAT THINS
_ Sb RITZ9
' ,6oz S. Forest 995,

w71 Wi

.49

knew something was up. I thought
maybe the delinquents were back, I
grabbed my .22. I don't know why."
Rich
"When the dogs started barking, we
all got scared shitless. I dropped my
pumpkin, and ranto the camper. Smit-
ty had two big ones, and so did Mike,
and maybe Vince had some. They
didn't drop theirs. I don't even think
they were worried about getting
caught, just the dogs barking."
Sheriff Carlton
"I was sure I heard shots. It's a quiet
county. But they were so faint, I
thought maybe I was dreaming. I didn't
go for coffee, anyway."
Farmer Kelley
"I saw them running out of the field to
the road from my front porch. At first I
See PUMPKINS, Page 25
IT'S THE CHOICE
OF THE COACHES
JERRY ERICKSON'S
Personal Distinctive
Hair Care
668=8669
Appointments Available
Open Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 p.m..
Wednesdays 8:30-8:00 p.m.
Saturdays 8:30-3:00 p.m.
806 S. STATE ST.

music available it's impossible not to
miss some gems. To examine even
a reasonable representative chunk of
new music would take up all of one's
time and bank account. And in this
great desert that is called the Midwest,
much of it simply isn't available.
Case in point, I went into a local
record store to look for Van Dyke
Park's Jump, a highly praised album
on a major label, and got only shrugs
from the gentlemen behind the counter.
So out of necessity I've had to draw
some rather strict lines to work in
which will, quite understandably, an-
noy many people. I've excluded
classical because there are so many
fine recordings of Chopin's Nocturnes
that one more, even on digital, fails to
excite me. I've ignored funk because
outside of Bill Laswell's fringe work it's
all trend-consciously silly (turn on a
funk station and just try to find a song
without scratching and vocoder effec-
ts). And though I respect jazz, I openly
admit to inexcusable ignorance for the
most part.
As a result, my top ten recordings fall
into that vaguely encompassing term,
popular music. Rock and pop and
anything that the artists within care to
extend and draw upon. What we have
here is a collection of ten recordings
that I feel extremely fortunate to have
run into, and a brief description as to
why.
1. T-Bone Burnett - Proof Through
The Night (Warner) 2. Richard Thom-
pson - Hand Of Kindness (Hannibal)
3. Talking Heads - Speaking in
Tongues (Sire) 4. Laurie Anderson -
Mister Heartbreak (Warner) 5. Peter
Gabriel - Plays Live (Geffen) 6. Joe
Jackson - Body And Soul (Warner) 7.
Paul Simon - Hearts and Bones
(A&M) 8. Aztec Camera - High Land,
Hard Rain (Sire) 9. Ronald Shannon
Jackson & The Decoding Society -
Barbecue Dog (Antilles) 10. Jerry Gold-
smith - Under Fire Soundtrack (War-
ner)
If I were forced to pick the one album
of the year that impressed me the most,
Proof Through The Night wins by a
margin so wide it wasn't a race. T-
Bone Burnett writes with a level of in-
sight comparable only to Randy
Newman, and with greater conviction.
Burnett's songs are sad, bitter,
hilarious portraits of the human soul,
set to a charged blend of rock, folk, and
Texas blues, aided in its delivery on this
album by session work from Pete
Townshend, Mick Ronson, and Ry
Cooder. All of whom play with more
inventiveness here than they have on

tAURM-

tyPi0q-50N

any of their own recent works.
Proof is not as cohesive an overall
work as Burnett's previous solo works,
but it's by far his most impassioned in
its sardonic, painful look at the rem-
nants of the American dream and the
sort of people who haunt its wreckage.
Burnett sketches them with com-
passion and dignity. And as pessimistic
as his tone often is, he refuses to
relinquish hope. If America is sinking
into the mire, Burnett, with his teeth
and claws sunk into its hide, and heels
dug into the ground, isn't going to let it
happen without a fight.
On Hand Of Kindness, Scottish
songwriter/guitarist Richard Thom-
pson, a Fairport Convention alumnus,
released a collection of more personal,
but deeply compelling songs. Mixing
Celtic folk elements to rock (often hard,
often gentle) Thompson explores the
human heart through the most direct
route, his own.

In the more modern vein of music,
the Talking Heads released their best
album yet, Speaking In Tongues. With
Brian Eno's auro of sterility no longer
hanging over their heads, the band has
finally achieved the boldness and full
oloodlessness they've striven for, and
only managed to capture before on
their live album.
Orson Wells once commented that
a movie studio was the best toy a kid
could have, but Laurie Anderson's
Mister Heartbreak makes a strong case
for the recording studio. This is a stun-
ningly original album, fill of witty,
quirks musically and lyrically, done in
a grand fashion. Anderson's music is a
mix of pop and the avant garde,
drawing heavily upon funk, African
rhythms, and traditional Japanese and
Caribbean melodies, among many
other sources. The result is a
singularly beautiful aural tapestry, full
of catchy hooks at the oddest place.
Peter Gabriel, who contributed to
Mister Heartbreak and to whom Ander-

son
mak4
live
conc
ts, i
man
ener
a ra
reini
alive
Mi
Body
mid-
char
ban
nosta
'50s;
air o
topic
tros
balla
fun a
Pa
also
more
Too
self
Dista
faile
indic
Azb
Land
of air
acous
amaz
Fran
are a
be a
adole
you s
Ba
cross
drum
my o
fusio
borrc
freely
into
Fir
smith
Fire.
contr
Often
acces
Gol
Herr
tryin
hence
of h

Choosing the ten best albums of the
year is a task I wouldn't curse my worst
enemy with. It's like trying to find the
ten most exquisite snow flakes in a bliz-
zard. With the wealth of recorded

On
a I
.--

£

SELF SERN
Additional c

opies 34
Expires 6-30-84

1 C4

-3 /2C

Per copy depending on copies/original
ORIGINALS MUST BE FEEDABLE -
20 lb. white paper
24 hour turnaround MAY be required

I

;,w 818

I

FREE BIC PEN
with a 504 order

not good on course packs

Expires 6-30-84

Corner

SUN-THURS
FRIDAY
SATURDAY

8-12
9-12
9-1

'A
523
994
Rare
514 E

DOLLAR BILL COPYING
611 Church 665-9200 - Open 7-Days

DOLLAR BILL COPYING
611 Church 665-9200 Open 7-Days

L'

6 .. ._ . _. _ _,

24 Weekend/Friday, April 13, 1984

a ~17W

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan