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April 13, 1984 - Image 15

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-13

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 13, 1984 - Page 15
Two of a kind

Larkin, Kamieniecki vie for Olyi

By JOE EWING
Barry Larkin and Scott Kamieniecki
of the Michigan baseball team are alike
in many ways.
Both were selected by their
hpmetown teams in the 1982 major
league draft; both were catalysts for
Michigan as freshmen last season as
the Wolverines made it to the College
IWorld Series; and both were pre-season
All-America picks this year.
THEY BOTH ALSO will have a shot
at Olympic glory this summer.
t-r
Last fall, after making it through two
series of tryouts, both Larkin and
Kamieniecki were named to a list of 44
finalists for the United States Olympic
Baseball team. Now, the Olympic
organizers will be keeping a special eye
on them this year to see if they have
what it takes to represent the U.S.
"They're both fine young ball
players," said Rod Dedeaux, head
coach at the University of Southern
California and coach of the Olympic
squad. "We'll be giving both of them a
good look this year."
AND IF DEDAUX likes what he sees,
Larkin and Kamieniecki could be in-
vited to Louisville in mid-June to
try out for a 25-man traveling squad
that the final 20 for the Olympic squad
will be chosen from.
So making the 44-man list doesn't

mean that any player has made the
team yet. In fact, Dedeaux claimed
that there are probably players who did
not make the list that will make the
Olympic squad. "Obviously we don't
know yet," he said. "There might be
people out there who are not on the list
who are better than the ones on the
list."
So really, making the list of finalists
gets a player nothing more than an ex-
tra look that a player not on the list
might not bet. But it could be that extra
look that helps Larkin and Kamieniecki
impress the Olympic coaches like they
have impressed other baseball experts
in the past.
LARKIN, A SHORTSTOP out of Cin-
cinnati Moeller High School, was
thought enough of by the Cincinnati
Reds to become their number two draft
pick right out of high school in 1982. But
instead of playing professional ball
right away, he chose to come to
Michigan. His reasoning for this choice
was simple.
"I knew I wasn't ready to go and live
by myself," he admitted. "I felt I
needed the college atmosphere to do a
little growing up. I wasn't mature at
all."
But once he arrived in Ann Arbor, he
showed plenty of maturity on the
diamond, winning the starting shor-
tstop spot and hitting .352 as a fresh-
man. Last year he was also named
Most Valuable Player of the Big Ten
Tournament and was a member of
Baseball America's Freshman All-
American squad.
AFTER LAST SEASON, Larkin,
along with about 60 other players from
the area, attended an Olympic camp in
Ann Arbor run by Wolverine coach Bud
Middaugh. From that camp, he and
Kamieniecki were selected to move on
to the next set of trials in Louisville,
Kentucky, where the 44-man list was
picked.
"I think I did pretty well in
Louisville," said Larkin. "I hit the ball
well and played pretty good defense."
Kamieniecki went about making the
44-man roster a different way - he took
the hard route. After making it through
the Ann Arbor camp, Kamieniecki
decided not to go to Louisville because
he wanted to rest his arm.
"I HAD BEEN throwing here so
much during the year that my arm was
really tired," said Kamieniecki. "I
wouldn't have been able to show much
down there anyway.
"But they sent the list out and I was
on it," he continued. "I was kind of sur-
prised."
Evidently, Kamieniecki had im-

npic spots
make it, it will be based upon what they
do this year. But at least they both got
off on the right foot this season, as
Larkin was named to Collegiate
Baseball's Pre-Season All-American
team, while Kamieniecki was an
honorable mention pre-season All-
American pick by Baseball A merica.
An early-season ankle injury had
kept Larkin out of the lineup for nearly
half of the Michigan games this year,
but he has still managed to hit at a .463
clip with four doubles. Kamieniecki,
meanwhile, is 2-1 on the mound with 16
strikeouts and a 2.61 ERA.
The Olympics could be just over the
horizon. Still, though, neither of them
want thoughts of the Olympics to inter-
fere with their efforts at Michigan this
season.
"When I'm playing I try not to think
about it," said Larkin. "I don't think
about it because I want to do well for
this team. If I play well enough and
people think well enough of me, they'll
pick me to play on the Olympic team."
"I think about it in the off-time," ad-
mitted Kamieniecki. "But when I'm in
a game, I don't think about it because if
I don't have a good year for Michigan,
then there's no way I'm going to make
the team."

ImAgine Snummer'84

Kamieniecki
... does it the hard way
pressed someone somewhere along the
line, just like he had impressed Detroit
so much that the Tigers made him their
second-round pick in the 1982 draft right
out of Redford St. Mary's High School.
BUT LIKE LARKIN, he chose not to
play professionally until after going to
college. And like Larkin he got off to a
great start at Michigan, knotching a no-
hitter against Cleveland State for his
first victory in a Wolverine uniform. On
the year, he posted-a 5-1 mark with a
2.84 earned run average.
Nonetheless, neither of the Michigan
duo is going to win spots on the Olympic
team on last year's merits. If they
m
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the Family Financial Statement mailed to ACT by:
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Application material is available at the OFA.

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1:00 - 4:00

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