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April 05, 1984 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-05

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Women's Softball
vs. Indiana
Saturday at 2:30 p.n
The Michigan Daily
Sizemo
By RICH WIEDIS
1984 will be a banner year for our
national pastime as baseball will for the
first time appear in the Olympics. And
former Wolverine batsman and eleven-
year major league veteran Ted
Sizemore has been doing his part to
make sure that baseball fever catches
on around the world.
In 1983, Sizemore, who ended his
professional career four years ago,
stepped into the world of international
baseball. The '66 Michigan graduate
took on the post of vice president in
charge of player development for the
Rawlings Company. Rawlings, a major
:N sporting goods manufacturer, in con-
junction with the Los Angeles Dodgers
v and General Electric has been one of
he tbiggest forces in bringing base-
ball to this year's summer games.
"RIGHT NOW baseball is only an
exhibition sport, " said Sizemore. "In
the future we are hoping that Olympic
baselball will generate the same kind of
enthusiasm that the United States
hockey team was able to produce in
1980."
One of Sizemore's goals as a world-
wide developer of baseball is to in-

m.

SPORTS

Men's Tennis
vs. Northwestern
Friday at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 5, 1984

Page 7

re now sizing up Olympic baseball talent

crease the number of countries with
teams capable of competing at an
Olympic level. If this can be accom-
plished by 1988, the next summer
games in Korea may feature baseball
as a gold medal sport.%
"My work has been on an amateur
level as well as the professional," said

For Sizemore, Los Angeles was also
the first stop on a major league
itinerary that covered five cities during
his career. The 5-10 second baseman
played for St. Louis, Philadelphia,
Chicago, and Boston before retiring in
1980.
Even though Sizemore's career ap-
peared mediocre (he never batted
higher than .281 in a full season clinging
around a lifetime mark of .264) he was
valuable enough to remain in the
majors longer than the average ball
player.
"HE'LL NEVER BE in the Hall of
Fame," said former Michigan baseball
coach Moby Benedict. "But he was
very important to his teams because he
would give up his at bat for you. When
you're a manager, Ted is the type of
player you love to have."
After a one year stint with the
Dodgers in 1969, Sizemore was dealt to
the Cardinals for slugger Dick Allen. In
St. Louis he developed a reputation for
being a team player. During the 1974
season Sizemore batted second behind
base-stealing great Lou Brock. This
was the year the speedster flew past
Maury Wills on the all-time base

stealing charts, posting a season record
of 118 thefts.
"I'm sure Lou (Brock) would give
Ted alot of credit for his record," said
coach Benedict.
SIZEMORE MADE batting behind a

Sizemore. "Rignt now, asiae from tne
Olympics we: are helping to develop
leagues around the world with high
quality players like those in Italy and
Holland."
"WE ARE VERY excited about the
Olympic baseball exhibition," he con-
tinued. "There are six finalists (Cuba,
Korea, Taiwan, Nicaragua, Italy and
the United States), each was the winner
of a regional tournament and will play
in an eight day round-robin tournament
at Dodger Stadium."

base stealer into an art. "My job was to
take until he went," said the strategist.
"I used to stand as deep as I could in the
batter's box and use the longest bat I
could find. This forced the catcher to
throw an extra two feet," he recalled.
"I always believed in the team con-
cept," Sizemore said. "If I could take a
pitch for Lou so he could steal second,
then hit the ball to the right side forcing
him to thiril, (Joe) Torre would come
up with one out and drive him in."
For eleven years Sizemore
capitalized on his ability to do the dirty
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work. While he turned double plays and
sacrificed his turn at bat, his team-
mates received publicity. The situation
is much the same today working behind
the scenes at the Olympics. The veteran,
however, revelled in the importance of
his role.
"The glamor people will always be
the big hitters but the players know
what the little guy does for the team."
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Sizeore
.developing Olympians

'Lousma comes to town to learn about education

(Continued from Page 1)
today's multi-million dollar his oppo
engineering complex on North Campus. nominatio
"I've seen the campus just grow," Dunn, but
Lousma said. "Clearly the University is over 1,000
going to continue to be one of the $25,000 of c
leaders in the country and we'll con- DUNN A
tinue to support it" he said. bor yeste
Lousma declined to say much about women's
Reagan defends
(Continued from Page 1) developing
debate in public." Reagan said foreign worldwide
policy must be in the province of the Soviet Un
president, the constitutional comman-
der-in-chief. plying to
"I DON'T think that a committee of He was
535 persons can offer the guidance represents
needed," he said in his nationally to approp
televised news conference. weapons,
% Reagan opened his news conference several ye
with an announcement that Vice "I don't
President George Bush will go to stand up,'
Geneva in two weeks with a new haven't pr
American proposal aimed at breaking 15 years.
stalled 40-nation United Nations
negotiations on a treaty banning
development, production and stock- 3
piling of chemical weapons. i
*Reagan said this- country is

nent for the Republican
n, East Lansing builder Jim
he did say his organization of
volunteers is now taking in
contributions a week.
ALSO campaigned in Ann Ar-
erday, addressing a local
group before moving on to
Meese
ig "bold and sound" means of
eban on the weapons ; the
ion has proposed a ban ap-
Europe.
asked whether his proposal
s an attempt to get Congress
priate money for chemical
which it has refused to do for
ars.
I think the accusation would
" the president replied. "...We
roduced any such weapons for
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th A,* o' Lb" 76"*700

meet students and faculty members at
Eastern Michigan University.
Dunn has repeatedly demanded a
debate with Lousma, and Lousma said
he has accepted and will meet Dunn
shortly before the August primary. The
primary will decided which candidate
will face Democratic incumbent Carl
Levin in the general election.
Lousma began his day at Ann Arbor
Pioneer High School, and then visited
Thurston Elementary School to look at
their use of computers in the
classroom. After his campus visit,
Lousma observed job training classes

at Washtenaw Community College, and
ended his day speaking before a group
of home builders.
Today, Lousma is scheduled to teach
a class at Central Michigan University
and will continue to visit grade schools
and other colleges.
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State must
downsize
colleges,
study says
(Continued from Page 1)
it," he said.
ANOTHER CHARGE of the com-
mission was to find ways higher
education could spur economic growth
in the state.
Colleges should "encourage spin-off
industries through innovative research
and make efforts to dissolve im-
pediments to the transfer of
technology," such as conflicts of in-
terest between business and resear-
chers, said James Robinsen, chairman
of the commission.
The commission also predicted that
enrollment in colleges statewide will
drop 10 percent by the year 2000, and
recommended that schools hold off on
new programs until a better statewide
review process can be created.

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We also take the pain out
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That's a lot less than
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(R O
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