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January 12, 1984 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8 -The Michigan Daily --Thursday, January 12, 1984
SPOR TS OF THE DAIL Y
Smith, Panthers stillnegotiating

By CHUCK JAFFE
Michigan quarterback Steve Smith
said yesterday that he has not signed a
contract with the Michigan Panthers of
the United States Football League, but
added that he is negotiating with the
team.
Smith said that he has not hired an
agent, but that someone is handling the
contract talks for him.
"THIS DOESN't mean that I'm going
to sign, only that we are talking about a
contract," said Smith, who finished his
career as Michigan's all-time leading
passer. "I have no idea if I'll sign, to tell
you the truth. I don't really even know
exactly what they might be offering."
Smith denied published reports that
had him close to signing with the Pan-
thers.
vyv
Smith
... no decisions were made
"I don't know where people got the
idea that I had signed. Everything here
was pretty basic, and no decisions were
made."
Smith said he plans to attend a
scouting combine tryout in New
Orleans if he does not sign with the Pan-
thers.
"If I don't sign, I'm going to New
Orleans," said Smith. "We'll have to
wait and see what happens with the
contract. I still don't know anything."

lruins 7, Red Wings 2
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - The Red Wings proved a
lot last night. They proved they couldn't
check, couldn't pass, couldn't run a
power play, couldn't kill a penalty, and
most of all, couldn't put the puck in the
net.
Unable to capitalize on any of their
five power plays, the Wings handed the
Boston Bruins a 7-2 victory before
14,682 disappointed fans at Joe Louis
Arena.
YES, HANDED. The Bruins did not
play a great game. They were outshot,
35-32, and the game was played mostly
in Boston's end of the ice.
But the Bruins defense, particularly
goaltender Doug Keans, proved equal
to the task.
Detroit coach Nick Polano was not
too disappointed. "The number of
scoring chances we had was good, but
he (Keans) stoned us. The final play to
put the puck in the net just isn't hap-
pening."
Rick Middleton led a Boston team
that wasted few opportunities with two
goals and an assist. The line of Mid-
dleton, Barry Pederson and Norm
Kluzak accounted for five of Boston's
seven goals.
It wasn't Boston's ability to score that
made the game disappointing to Detroit
fans. Rather, it was Detroit's inability
to turn opportunities into goals.
Bruin goaltender Keans said, "I
played a pretty good game, the defense
played a great game and the puck just
wasn't getting past us tonight."
- TOM KEANEY
Indiana 73, Illinois 68
BLOOMINGTON - (UPI) Freshman
guard Steve Alford scored 29 points, in-
cluding six free throws in overtime, to
help Indiana beat No. 10 Illinois, 73-68,
last night in a nationally televised Big
Ten basketball game.
The victory gave Indiana a 2-0 Big
Ten record and a 9-3 overall mark.
Illinois dropped to 2-1 in the conference
and 11-2 overall.
INDIANA LED 45-34 midway through

the second half when Illinois scored 13
straight points, led by sophomore guard
Doug Altenberger who had three
baskets.
The lead went back and forth through
the last four minutes of the game until a
basket by senior Chuck Franz, who
finished with a career-high 20 points
gave Indiana a 61-59 lead with 14 se-
conds left.
But Altenberger, who was high for
Illinois with 23 points, hit a long jumper
at the buzzer to send the game into
overtime.
In the extra period, Indiana scored
nothing but free throws. The first four,
two by Alford and two Mike Giomi,
gave Indiana a 65-61 lead with 1:28 left.
Altenberger hit one free throw to cut
the difference to three points, 65-62, but
Alford and Hoosier center Uwe Blab
each hit two more free throws to give
Indiana a 69-62 lead with a minute left.

Pistons 112, Pacers 96
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Kelly
Tripucka scored 25 points and Vinnie
Johnson added 24, including 11 in the
final quarter, leading the Detroit
Pistons to a 112-96 National Basketball
Association victory last night over the
Indiana Pacers.
Indiana, trailing most of the game,
closed within three points early in the
fourth quarter before the Pistons
steadily pulled away in the final
minutes. Bill Laimbeer had a game-
high 19 rebounds and added 12 points,
while teammate Isiah Thomas had 16
points and 11 assists for Detroit.
The Pacers were led by Clark Kellogg
with 23 points and Herb Williams with
22 points, 12 rebounds and seven assists.

NCAA changes rules;*
presidents gain, power

(Continued from Page 1)
some special priveleges which I think
they deserve," said University faculty
representative Paul Gikas, who atten-
ded the convention along with Athletic
Director Don Canham. "It helps them
get more directly involved if they so
desire."
The original proposal, which the con-
vention voted down 328-318, would have
given the presidential commission
power to adopt or alter bylaws and
resolutions governing college athletics.
A two-thirds vote by a subsequent
NCAA convention would have been
necessary to overturn a decision by the
presidential board.
In the second major issue at the con-
vention, delegates accepted a proposal
that allows Division I-A schools, mostly
football powers, to pass their own
legislation in a special June meeting.
The convention also passed a
measure allowing scholarship athletes

to receive Pell Grants from the gover-
nment in addition to athletic scholar-
ships.
"The concern with the Pell Grants
was that the poorer athletes didn't have
enough spending money at school,"
said Gikas. "Those grants have nothing
to do with athletic ability. They just
give the students money to live more
comfortably."
Regarding the newly-increased
autonomy for Division I-A schools,
Canham pointed out that arguments
between the football powers and the
smaller schools have been going on for
some time.
Larger schools, many of which are
members of the College Football
Association, hope to arrange their own
television contracts so that they do not
have to share the revenues with the
smaller schools. Some schools even
threatened to withdraw from the NCAA
if their autonomy was not increased.

Keeping Score
By CHUCK JAFFE
Gambling with recruiting ...
... Illinois loses pocket change
NICKELS and dimes
Illinois football coach Mike White took them to the Rose Bowl, gambled
with them and lost.
Now White may have to pay the price - possible NCAA probation.
Two days after UCLA crushed the Illini 45-9 in the Rose Bowl, Illinois
athletic director Neale Stoner received a letter of violations from the NCAA.
Within 90 days, Illinois could find itself on probation.
"They're trying to nickel and dime us to death," said Stoner, who refused
to detail any of the more than 30 alleged infractions. Illinois now gets 90 days
in which to reply to the charges, after which time they face a possible sen-
tence.
But it is Illinois' attitude toward the problem, and not to the possible san-
ctions, that is most frightening. The Illini don't seem to care if they go on
probation. The athletic department seems resigned to the fact that Illinois
cheated.
"It's no big surprise that this is happening," said one Illinois athletic
department staff member, who asked to remain anonymous. "It's probably
part of building a winning program. Everybody flirts with the rules."
That type of statement, however, is a cop-out from a school that has been
caught.
Illinois would become the second Big Ten school to go on probation for
recruiting violations - Wisconsin was barred from national television for
the 1984 season - and it would mark the second time in Mike White's four
years at Illinois that the Illini have taken a dive.
Do cheaters really prosper?
This philosophy of cheating to build a program is increasing at an alar-
ming rate in the NCAA. Although the sanctions against schools detected for
cheating are great, the rewards for building a program, or for taking the
risks, far outweigh the penalties.
At Illinois, Clemson, USC and Arizona, the credibility of the athletic
program has been sacrificed for winning. And even after going on probation,
the schools have been able to keep on winning, because high school recruits
want to play for a winner - or for what they perceive as a "renegade" team.
But being a renegade is hardly the proper attitude for college athletes. Ac-
cording to Michigan recruiting coordinator Fritz Seyferth, the honesty and
integrity involved in a recruiting program start at the top.
"If Don Canham and Bo Schembechler weren't so dedicated to playing the.
game 100 percent within the rules, then we might have problems with our
alumni when it comes to recruiting," Seyferth said in November. "A lot of
the violations that you see are caused by alumni who get involved in
recruiting. We have more active alumni than anyone in the country, but they
know how Bo feels about recruiting, and so we don't get any problems."
How strongly can a school like Michigan act when it comes to recruiting?
Just ask Dan Holloway an All-American linebacker from Detroit who was
heralded as one of Schembechler's top recruits last year. After signing his
letter of intent, Holloway didn't make the academic grade, and was never
allowed into the university. No one even considered offering "special help,"
according to Seyferth.
At USC, former Heisman Trophy winner Charles White admitted that
he never took some classes for which'he received passing grades. At Illinois
in 1980, Dave Wilson played, despite the fact that he was ineligible. Since
neither Stoner nor the NCAA will comment, one can only guess the nature of
the charges against the Illini this time.
Big Ten doesn't need to cheat
But what is important in this case is the example it sets. Illinois must be
severely punished - the athletic department staff member said it "won't be
so bad if we are only out for two years." The extent of the penalty must be
such that the program is damaged and the team must start again from
scratch.
This may penalize the athletes at the school, but to do anything else hurts
athletes that are properly recruited, and schools that follow the NCAA
guidelines.
A Big Ten school should not have to cheat. The quality'of such a university,
as well as its athletic programs, should be sufficient to lure the top football
players in the country.
Maybe if Illinois had not done so well this season, these allegations never
would have come to light. That might be an argument of both White and
Stoner.
Then again, if Illinois hadn't nickled and dimed the rules to death, it
might never have done so well.

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