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March 30, 1984 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-30
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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Fuchsia silk dress
by Maria Scotto,
Italy, $375 (left).
Window-pane
double-breasted
grey wool suit
with pleated
trousers by Canali,
Italy, $575; cotton
Shirt by Ingirami,
$60; silk bowtie,
by Prochownick;
$25. Available at
Renaissance.
Background:
Escoffier.

ANN ARBOR THEATER
210 S.5th; 761-9700
CARMEN
No, not the opera, but a purportedly good film
adaptation. Music, bigger than life, and
cinematography above and beyond most traditional
operas.
LIQUID SKY
When you're looking for dinner in the Big Apple,
you probably don't think of heroin and orgasms.
You're not an alien in a barbeque, though. This
negative approach to post-punk cinema, seriously, is
so far the: film of '84.
MOVIES AT BRIARWOOD
Briarwood Mall; 769-8780
AGAINST ALL ODDS
Not nearly so existential as some have said, but
quite intriguing, especially to those with a strong in-
terest.

THE DRESSER
Not furniture, but rather Tom Courtenay, who
plays Skakespearian actor's Albert Finney's
"dresser." One of this year's more artistic efforts.
FOOTLOOSE
A modern cultural thing viviantly expressing
American youth's predilection for freedom. A
possible successor to Flashdance.
MISUNDERSTOOD
A recently completed film treating an ephemeral
and often sequencious trepidation of existence tem-
porally coinciding with an interesting denounient.
Occasionally mauve and very taupe.
ROMANCING THE STONE
Kathleen Turner (Body Heat . . .) and Michael
Douglas star in "this action-packed" adventure film
trailing through underdeveloped territory. Some
people have not compared it to Raiders of the Lost
Ark.
CAMPUS THEATER
1214 S. University; 668-6416
GREYSTOKE
Inspired probably not by a lack of previous inter-
pretations, this movie again recreates the Tarzar
myth of Edgar Rice Burr'oughs.
the proceedings. See it. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB
4 7-00,9:15)

FOX-VILLAGE THEATER
Maple.Village; 769-1300
TERMS OF ENDEARMENT
A widow (Shirley MacLaine), tries to settle some
of the confusing points of a mother/daughter
relationship with her daughter (Debra Winger).
ICE PIRATES
Star Wars may have had seven good years, but it
seems that its luck has run out. It's called a "space
comedy," but parody may be closer to the mark.
REUBEN REUBEN
Tom Conti cuts an erotic swath through the college
lecture curcuit as a philandering poet just trying to
earn a buck. Co-eds, housewives, and the east-coast
atmosphere combine to stimulate his creativity.

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EAST OF EDEN (Elia Kazan, 1955)
James Dean, great idol of the fifties, is one of two
brothers competing for their father's affection. From
the John Steinbeck novel. (Classic Film Theatre;
Michigan Theater, 7:10)
EAST OF EDEN (Elia Kazan, 1955)
James Dean, great idol of the fifties, is one of two
brothers competing for their father's affection.
From the John Steinbeck novel. (Classic Film
Theatre; Michigan Theater, 7:10)
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Nicholas Ray, 1955)
James Dean again, this time with Natalie Wood
and Sal Mineo in a look at juvenile delingquency. Af-
terwards, there will be a James Dean lookalike con-
test, which should begin at 11:20. (Classic Film
Theatre; Michigan Theater, 9:30)
IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT (Frank Capra, 1934)
Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert fall in love
while she tries to escape mariage to another. The
winner of a ton of Oscars. (Cinema Guild; Lorch
Hall, 7:00)
BRINGING UP BABY (Howard Hawks, 1938)
Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn in a comedy
that sounds delightfully implausible - her dog takes
a dinosaur bone from Grant, a very dedicated
paleontologist. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 9:00)
PASSION (Jean-Luc Godard, 1982)
An Ann Arbor Premiere of the most recent effort
by the French director. The characters talk about
capitalist oppression and aethetic vitality, while the
audience tries to put the two together. (Cinema 2;
Aud. A, 7:00, 9:00)
THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES (Clint Eastwood,
1976)
An earlier Eastwood attempt at making our day.
It's a chase in the post Civil War west as Eastwood
wants revenge after his family is slain Also with
Chief Dan George and Sandra Locke. (Alternative
Action; Nat. Sci. Aud.,7:00)
HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER (Clint Eastwood, 1973)
Eastwood plays the title role, too. It appears as if a
bunch of outlaws are trying to take over a town, and
the people decide drifter Eastwood is just the protec-
tion they need. (Alternative Action; Nat. Sci. Aud.,
9:30)
BREATHLESS (Jean-Luc Godard, 1959)
A double feature that is definitely not for the easily
out of breath; starts with the original version of the
film about a gangster on the run befriending a lady.
French with subtitles. (Mediatrics; MLB 3, 7:15).
BREATHLESS (Jim McBride, 1983)
The remake of the French version stars Richard
Gere in the title role. . . Valerie Kaprisky is the love
interest. (Mediatrics; MLB 3, 9:00)
HAIR (Milos Forman, 1979)
Saving the best for last, the final film of a busy
Friday is a splended musical adaptation of the
Broadway musical with great music, choreography.
The plot sneaks up on you, leaving a poignant end to

THE UNDEAD (Roger Corman, 1957)
The start of a B movie extravaganza by the master
of the genre. A warning: Some of the films listed on
the AAFC schedule were pulled. The information
here is correct. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci
Aud., 7:00)
CREATURE FROM THE HAUNTED SEA (Roger
Corman, 1960)
A night of Corman films continues with a classib B
movie mixture of cheap-looking monsters,
derivative gangsters, Cuban exiles, etc. If only it had
Annette Funicello. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 8:20)
THE TERROR (Roger Corman, 1963)
The final Corman experience of the evening, Boris
Karloff, Jack Nicholson, and a girl stuck in the castle
of a madman. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci. Aud.,
9:30)
THREE STOOGES FESTIVAL.
Larry, Curly and Moe. Chances are you heard of
them. Tonight you can see a whole bundle of their
trips down slapstick lane. (Hill Street Cinema; 1429
Hill, 8:00,10:15)
BARBARELLA (Roger Vadim, 1968)
Jane Fonda travels through space, where
everything seems to be a plot to keep her clothing
down to a bare minimum. Definitely a different Fon-
da than the one we have today. (Cinema 2; Aud. A,
7:00,9:00)
THE LAST WALTZ (Martin Scorcese,1978)
A documentary rock movie all about the last con-
cert of The Band in 1976. In addition to The Band,
there are many guest stars such as Bob Dylan, Joni
Mitchell, and Eric Clapton. (Mediatrics; MLB 4,
7:00,9:00)
APOCALYPSE NOW (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
Marlon Brando is in the center of a very long and
dull Vietnamese heart of darkness, which deals with
the attempt by Martin Sheen to terminate him with
extreme prejudice. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 6:30,
9:15)
ZELIG (Woody Allen, 1983)
This is not a masterpiece, by any means. But it is an
entertaining ninety minutes as Allen plays a man
with no personality who just takes whatever is lying
around. Worth seeing. The cinematographjy is up for
an Oscar. (Alternative Action; MLB 3, 7:00, 8:45,
10:30)

THE APPLE GAME (Vera Chytilova, 1976)
It took a while, but this Czech film about a doctor
who finds all the women on hospital staff objects for
his affection finally gets an Ann Arbor Premiere.
Czech with subtitles. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB4,
7:00)
FLYING DOWN TO RIO (Thornton Freeland, 1933)
Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers team up for the
first time and do the Carioca. Also a production
number on an airplane wing. (Mediatrics; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 7:15)
FUNNY FACE (Stanley Donen, 1957)
Fred Astaire again, this time with Audrey Hep-
burn. The setting is Paris, and the music is by the
Gershwin brothers, Ira and George. (Mediatr cs;
Nat. Sci. Aud., 9:00)
SORCEROR (William Friekin, 1977)
Roy Scheider stars in a movie by the director of
The Exorcist about a dangerous trek with
nitroclycerine through the wilds of Central America.
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, 9:10)
DRAGONSLAYER (Matthew Robbins, 1980)
A fantasy movie with a very typical plot about a
boy who has to kill the dragon to save the princess
and the kingdom. (Classic Film Theatre; Michigan
Theater, 2:15,7:00)
EXCALIBUR (John Boorman, 1980)
A bit episodic, but otherwise a wonderful retelling
of the Camelot legends by the director of Deliveran-
ce. The photography is beautiful. (Classic Film
Theatre, Michigan Theater, 4:30, 9:15)

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FRONT LINE (David Bradbury, 1980)
A look at a cameraman who spent eleven years on
the front of the Vietnam War. (Alternative Action;
East Quad, 8:40, FREE)
KLASSEN-FEIND (Peter Stein, 1983)
The Nigel Williams play called Class Enemy is. the
source material. Following the film, a professor
from the University of Cologne will be on hand for
discussion. (Goethe Institut; East Quad, 7:00,
FREE)

KRAFTPROBE (Heidi Genee, 1982)
Translated, the title means "Test of Strength,"
and the movie chronicles just that for a fifteen year
old who has been living on her own. (Goethe Institut;
East Quad, 7:00, FREE)
DAS ENDE DES REGENBOGENS (Uwe Friessner,
1979)i
The German series concludes with a look at a boy
trying to escape from a life of crime. This, like the
other German films, is German with subtitles.
(Goethe Institut; East Quad, 8:40, FREE)

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THE CONTRACT (Menahem Golan, 1974)
From Israel, a comedy about families feuding over
insurance. (Hill Street Cinema; 1429 Hill, 6:45, 9:00)
THE BIG CARNIVAL (Billy Wilder, 1951)
A rescue attempt becomes an opportunity to make
money and fame, while the man waiting for rescue
suffers through the time-consuming hoopla. Kirk
Douglas stars as one of the exploiters. (Cinema 2;
Aud. A, 7:00)
THE BIG HEAT (Fritz Lang, 1953)
Glenn Ford attempts to unravel a big crime ring
that seems to have sunk roots into the police like ivy
to the side of a building. Gloria Grahame and Lee
Marvin are also on hand. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 9:00)

White tank dress, $52; belt, $12. Available at Collected Works. Background:'
Michigan Theater.

Girbaud khaki pant, $66; and sweater, $50; Willi Wear shirt, $34; Bron straw hat,
$50. Available at Bivouac.

TOM JONES (Tony Richardson, 1963)
Another one of those films that won so many
Academy Awards the engraver gave a bulk discount.
This one is an adaptation of the Henry Fielding novel

10 Weekend/Friday, March 30, 1984

31 We

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