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March 30, 1984 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-30

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Women protest U.S.
missiles in England

The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 30, 1984 - page 9
Hunter encourages

GREENHAM COMMON, England
AP) - Defiant women protesters have
endured cold, jail terms, fines, court in-
junctions and demolition squads for
two-and-a-half years in makeshift
camps outside this cruise missile base.
But bureaucracy, with bulldozers
looming behind, is tightening its control
around the world's. best-known "peace
camp." Frustrated officials hope to
drive away the women whom guards,
patrol dogs and barbed wire have failed
to intimidate.
"I THINK they're finally going to
throw the book at us this time," said
Hazel Pegg, 24, a college dropout who
came here 15 months ago. "But we
won't go. Some women may give up, but
others will come."
Pegg was with 20 other women
wearing jeans and muddy boots as they
boiled lunchtime .eggsover a fire out-
side the main gate of the U.S. Air Force
base where U.S. nuclear-tipped cruise
isiles are deployed.

Established Sept. 5, 1981, after NATO
announced its plans to deploy 96 U.S.
cruise missiles at the base 50 miles west
of London, the camp is the oldest of
seven strung round the nine-mile
perimeter fence. The camps - clusters
of plastic sheeting, broken furniture,
fluttering peace symbols, and over-
flowing garbage cans - have rotating
populations of between a half-dozen and
50 women.
THE WOMEN'S protest is based on a
combination of pacifism, anti-nuclear
sentiment and feminism; men are not
permitted to join.
Since the protest began, about 1,500
women have been fined, mainly for
breaking into the base or blocking
roads, Pegg estimated, and another 500
jailed for between a week and a month.
In addition to the 96 missiles at
Greenham Common, another 64 cruise
missiles are scheduled to be deployed
at Molesworth near Cambridge by 1988.
The missiles are part of the total of 572
cruise and Pershing 2 mid-range
nuclear missiles NATO has agreed to
deploy in Britain, West Germany, Italy,
Belgium, and the Netherlands to coun-
ter Soviet SS-20s already in place
Eastern Europe.
MOST OF THE camps are on land
owned either by the local Newbury
District Council or the largerBerkshire'
County Council, which have stepped up
attempts to evict the women since Feb.
25 when 'the councils decided on joint
action.
The joint push against the
women's camps by the councils, both
controlled by the ruling Conservative
Party, appears to have had little effect
sofar.
But the Transport Department has
said it means business. "We know what
a sensitive issue this is and it's just not
true to say we're doing it in conspiracy
with the councils," said spokeswoman
Trudy Shah.
"We need the land. If they don't go,
bailiffs will move them physically.
Don't ask me how they'll do it, but
we're going to start work on April 2 or
thereafter," she said.
Last month, the Defense Ministry
discovered it owhs a patch of land on
which one camp is located. "We're con-
sidering what to do...we'll do
something," said a spokesman.
"We don't really know what's going
to happen now either, but somehow it'll
continue," said American Teresa Fit-
zgibbon, 47, of Trenton, N.J., a former
teacher-who splits her timehbetweenher
apartment in London anid the camps.

downtown
(Continued from Page 1)
paying for the programs and letting a
non-profit organization run daily
operations.
BUT THE recent plan by a local non-
profit group to purchase an old church
and convert it into a homeless shelter
is temporarily stalled due to funding
problems. Council initially considered
advancing a $25,000 downpayment on
the shelter, but delayed " making a
decision at this week's meeting.
Council put off the vote, according to
Hunter, because members are concer-
ned about their public images. Council
backed off on their offer to avoid com-
plaints by residents of Lune Terrace, a
senior citizens home, near the old chur-
ch on West Huron Street.
But Council's delay will only increase
tensions between neighborhood
residents and those using the shelter,
Hunter said.
"THEY JUST, in my opinion, did not
have the courage to deal with the
decision they had to make," says Hun-
ter.
Despite Hunter's concern that the
city pay more attention to human ser-
vices, Hunter favors downtown expan-
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expansion
sion - unlike many of his fellow
Democratic Council members.
"You've got to have some planned
growth," he says. But that expansion
must serve interests of the city and not
simply increase the tax base.
Republican councilmembers rely too
heavily on market considerations when
deciding where or how the city should
expand instead of focusing on what ser-
vices are needed, he says.
"I believe the market is a factor, but
not the only factor," he says.
Hunter has served on Council since
1982 and worked last year as a minority
student research for the Michigan
Student Assembly.
For the first time since 1978,
Democrats have a shot at gaining con-
trol on Council. If that happens, Hunter
expects some changes, but cautions
that the GOP will "still have the
mayor's veto."
USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
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Continued from Preceeding Page
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Guiding light Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF]
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Students call for code vote

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Hello . . . is that right?
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The Michigan Daily?
Carries Bloom County ...
THE BLOOM COUNTY?

(Continued from Page 1)
as to how to vote on the question.
"I think students who may have wan-
ted some type of code wouldn't have
known how to vote. I think people were
voting so quickly that in a lot of cases
people were responding to the screams
of 'vote no, no, around campus," said
Page, an LSA junior who ran on the
SMART party's ticket in the elections.
PAGE SAID that he personally voted
'Yes' on the first question, because he
feels that the University should adopt
some type of code. He said that he
hopes MSA would work with the ad-
ministration and students to draft a
code that is agreeable to both groups.
On the second ballot question, 92
percent of the 3,864 students who voted
said that the University and the MSA
should not support a code without first
putting it to a student vote.
Communications Prof. William
Comburn said the results of the election
1984
he SUMMER

are "very encouraging" for those who
support the code, however. "I think
when you get almost 20% supporting
(the code), that's fantastic." Colburn
chaired the committee that originally
wrote the code last winter.
Colburn said that the results are
especially exciting because of the vocal
opposition to the code in recent months.
Colburn was also critical of the Daily's
coverage of the code. '-'The major
source of information for students, The
Michigan Daily, has provided no
positive information on the code," said
Colburn. "If we had an equal chance,
I'm quite sure we would have come out
on top."

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