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March 30, 1984 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-30

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 30, 1984
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Soviet women choose single life

MOSCOW (AP) - Galina is a univer-
sity professor with her own apartment
and two privileges much prized in the
Soviet Union - trips abroad and her
own car.
But she is unhappy because she can't
find a suitable husband.
GALINA'S probelm is not unique.
More and more women in the Soviet
Union, which celebrated International
Women's Day earlier this month, ap-
pear to be chafing against ingrained
male chauvinism, staying single and
pursuing careers rather than marrying
for marriage's sake.
Their changing attitudes, as reflected
in a recent newspaper article and the
published response from readers, have
given rise to social problems which are
increasingly worrying Soviet
authorities. A declining birth rate is one
of the chief concerns.
The Communist Party last year
called for more meticulous studies on
the changing society.
"WHAT DO YOU need a man for?" is
one of the most frequent utterances of

'What do you need a man for? They all
drink, they are lazy, good for nothing. It i's
very difficult to find a good man.'
- Soviet woman

young Moscow women. "They all drink,
they are lazy, good for nothing. It is
very difficult to find a good man."
"How can I marry a man and have
his children if I don't respect him?" one
Moscow woman asked. "It's better to
be alone, although to be alone is
terrible."
Although Soviet women make up 50
percent of the labor force, they rarely
hold senior posts. Promotion is blocked
by traditional prejudice and hampered
by women taking time off for children.
THE TYPICAL Russian husband
doesn't help at home. His wife shops,
queuing for hours for scarce goods. She

cooks, cleans, and cares for the
children.
Younger, mostly Russian women are
beginning to rebel. They are forging
ahead in education, with statistics
showing that 59 percent of those with
secondary and higher education are
women.
Women's greater independence also
has spawned a rocketing divorce rate -
3 percent 30 years ago, 30 percent
nationwide now, and as high as 50 per-
cent in Russian cities such as
Leningrad.
A DECADE ago, most divorces
quickly remarried. Now, says jour-

nalist Tatyana Panina, a writer on
women's affairs, "the picture is
changing."
The problem of liberated women
rebelling against their men is almost
exclusive to Russians, the dominant
nationality in the Soviet Union.
Because of unstable marriages, a
more cosmopolitan outlook and in some
cases mutual agreement, Russian
couples are having fewer children. The
tradition-bound Moslem population of
central Asia has a much higher birth
rate and if the trend continues, the
Soviet Union will be less than 50 percent
Russian and almost 25 percent Moslem
by the year 2000.
THE MAIN newspaper of the Russian
federation, Sovietskaya Rossiya,
recently carried a reader discussion of
Galina's fruitless search for a good
a husband and the antagonism between
sexes.

I

Road repairs spark Second Ward

debate

"EAST OF EDEN"-7:10 p.m.
"REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE"

- 9:30 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)"
Greenhills High School also sponsored a
council resolution for the city to
allocate $1.3 million to street repairs.
BLOW SAYS the money for street
resurfacing could be channelled from
other areas of the general fund budget.
Burchell, however, calls Blow's
proposal "irresponsible" because it's
unlikely other programs could be cut to
fund street repairs.
"I think it is incumbant upon coun-
cilmembers to specify . . . just where
the money is going to come from," says
Burchell, who works as an aide for
State Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Ar-
bor).
"MY APPROACH to such an issue on
Council will be to dig into the budget, to
come up with a proposal - a solid

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proposal - to identify where the money
is and if it's there.
"I won't just come around with a
resolution right before City Council
elections," he adds. "I work on an issue
throughout the year."
Burchell is also critical of the par-
tisan quarreling that plagues many
Council meetings. The arguing often
prevents finding effective solutions to
basic issues such as deciding the city's.
budget.
TO ALLEVIATE the problem Bur-
chell would set up a finance committee
on which the mayor and two represen-
tatives from each party would serve.
The smaller group would bring better
results because members could focus
on only one problem while also in-
creasing cooperation.
In past years, Burchell said the city's
budget has been handled inefficiently.
"I just want to stress that when I get on
Council, I'm going to work. I'm not just
going to spout off rhetoric," Burchell
says.
Blow has a more positive view of
Council's past work. "I think this year
the council has done a better job of
working together."
AND BLOW thinks the problems
members do have, won't change

dramatically if Democratic win the
majority which he thinks is unlikely.
Even with a Democratic rule, the
Republican Mayor Louis Belcher would
still have veto power, Blow says. ,
The two candidates split widely on
what they consider they city's
priorities. For Blow, the top concern is
stimulating business growth.
HE SUPPORTS the construction of
Tally Hall, a restaurant and parking
structure on the 400-block of East
Washington St., and providing some tax
breaks for the building's owners.
Burchell also supports the construc-
tion of Tally Hall, but considers human
services such as a city-funded shelter
for Ann Arbor's homeless, equal rights,
and improving security in the city more
important.
Council hasn't followed through on
providing service to the city's
homeless, Burchell says.
Although Council is considering
paying the down payment on an old
church planned to be converted into a
shelter, Burchell says Council should do
more.
"I WANT to make services available
to (the homeless)," he says. Burchell
suggests job training and health ser-
vices program for the city's homeless.

Only 36 percent of workers on city
boards including Council are women
and only 8 percent are minorities,
which Burchell calls a "poor record."
He says he would try to change that
trend.
To improve security, Burchell says the
city needs more foot patrol officers,'6
better street lighting, and an improved
latenight taxi system.
ALTHOUGH safety is a concern to
Blow, he says foot patrols are too costly
and not as effective as car patrols.
Burchell who served for three terms
as a state legislator in New Hampshire
and on the Rochester city council in
New York, supports all three ballot
proposals.
Blow, however, supports only two of
the three ballot proposals. He favors a;
1.5 mill tax hike for street recon-
struction and an amendment that would
allow voters to put ordinances on the
April ballot. Under the current
procedures, only council can approve
or reject ordinances.

ADMISSION: $3

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A Publication ofthe Michigan Daily Friday March 23, 198
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Blow opposes the third proposal
which, call for improving and extending
city bike paths because he says the
costs are too high.

6

Student 'Assassins' worry officials

(Continued from Page 1)
Many students say they enjoy the
game, which has been played this year
in several dorms and began yesterday
in the Law Quad, and they say it is not
dangerous.
First-year law student Art Siegal,
who organized this year's game in the
Law Quad, said the game is useful as a
tension breaker. "I do not think it
promotes violence," he added.
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"TENSIONS get high during finals
week at the law school," said Rick
Garcia, a first-year law student who is
playing the game. "It's tough to keep
my mind off law, but anything that will
relieve some of the tension helps," he
said. People get into fist fights during
finals and are at their rope's end. It's
better to get your anxieties out with a
squirt gun."
Counseling Services coordinator Joan
Zald said that although she has never
watched the game she feels it is just a
way to relieve tension, "like reading a
spy story."
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Despite their objections, University
officials probably will not try to
prohibit the contest. "It's hard to ban a
game, Vice President for Student
Services Henry Johnson said, adding
that he can "think of more productive
ways to spend one's time."
"WE NEED to look at clearly defined
limits for the game," Heidke said.
Those regulations might include
notifying the University that the game
is being played, using weapons that do
not look real, and restricting the game
to certain areas.
Such rules might have prevented last
year's incident in the Union, where LSA
junior Larry Litogot was
surrounded by police and security
officers. He said he was "one of the few
people who took the game seriously."
Litogot was one of the last six people
alive in South Quad's Assassin game
last year.

"Towards the end of the game, five of
my friends and I made a deal not to
eliminate each other, but to help each
other out," he said. After everyone
else had been eliminated, -the six shot
each other in a simultaneous group
homicide.
Litogot revealed that his strategy
was to stay on the defensive. "We didn't
spend a lot of time in the dorm to avoid
getting killed. Sometimes we would
even eat in other dorms."

a

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