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March 28, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-28

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Faulkner love poems,
discovered in attic

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 28, 1984 - Page 5
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AUSTIN, Texas - Fourteen love
poems by novelist William Faulkner,
whose refusal to pay a subsidy to a
publisher kept the works hidden for 60
years, have been found in an attic and
will be published this spring.
The book, to be titled Visions in
Spring, will be released May 26 and is
described by its publisher, the
University, of Texas Press, as a.
"haunting" and "lyrical" work that
addresses loneliness, desireandkother
"basic human emotions.''
THE POEMS marked the transition
of the Nobel Prize-winning author
from poet to novelist and was his last
major work of poetry before
publishiing his first novel, Soldier's
Pay.
Faulkner, best known for novels
like Absalom, Absalom! and The
Sound and the Fury, bound the poetry
by hand and presented the 88-page
volume in the early 1920s to his future

wife, Estelle Franklin, while she still
was married to her first husband.
"This collection of poetry was the
first book-length work that Faulkner
had ever submitted for publication,"
Vicki Woodruff of UT Press said
yesterday. "But it never made it into
publication because Faulkner balked
at paying a subsidy the publisher
wanted in order to get the poems into
print."
Although Literary historians were
aware the works existed, the original
apparently was lost.
A Faulkner scholar from Chicago,
Judith Sensibar, received permission
from the author's daughter, Jill
Faulkner Summers, in 1979 to search
through the attic in the family home in
Charlottesville, Va., for the elusive
poetry.
"It's interesting in its own right, but
its primary importance is the way it
casts new light on his later fiction,''
Sensibar said.

French Diplomat
in west Beirut

- BEIRUT, Lebanon (UPI) - Uniden-
tified gunmen critically wounded a
French diplomat as he walked to work
yesterday, pumping five bullets into the
head and body of cultural secretary
Sauveur Gliozzio from a passing car.
While Gliozzio fought for his life at
the American University Hospital,
rival militias shelled residential neigh-
borhoods on either side of the "Green
Line" separating Moslem- west from
Christian east Beirut.
POLICE reported a 5-year-old girl
had been killed and 29 people wounded
in the shelling, the latest violation of a
tenuous cease-fire arranged this month
in Lausanne, Switzerland. At least 10
people were killed and 53 wounded in
similar violations Monday.
French and police sources said Glioz-
zio was just two blocks from the heavily
fortified French Embassy in west
Beirut when he was shot at close range
by three men in a car.
The sources said they believed the
gunmen had first followed the diplomat
AP Photo for nearly half a mile from his apar-
tment near the Commodore Hotel, the
a wounded man down a street along the unofficial headquarters of the foreign
press corps.

GLIOZZIO was rushed to the
American University Hospital, only a
block from the scene of the shooting, for
emergency surgery which lasted three
hours. He was hit in the head, stomach,
leg and twice in the abdomen, sources
said.
No one immediately claimed respon-
sibility, but an underground group
known as the Islamic Jihad has
previously threatened retribution
against French and American
diplomats because of attacks by their
nations' peace-keeping forces in
Lebanon.
Unknown gunmen shot and killed a
French Embassy driver and wounded
the wife of a French diplomat in
January. American political attache
William Buckley was abducted in west
Beirut near U.S. Embassy offices Mar-
ch 16 and has not been heard from sin-
ce.
The attempted assassination did not
slow down this week's phased with-
drawal of France's 1,250-member
peace-keeping contingent, the last unit
of the four-nation Western force sent to
Lebanon in 1982.

Study says youth
more conservative,

WASHINGTON (AP) - American
high school students have forsworn
most political protests, tempered their
obsession with moneymaking and
careers, and are "probably more
closely aligned with their parents than
they have been in 30 years," a survey of
youth attitudes contended yesterday.
"If there washa generation gap in the
'60s, it narrowed to a crack in the '70s.
It's barely a hairline in the '80s," said
Janis Cromer, author of the study en-
titled "The Mood of American Youth,"
prepared for the National Association
of Secondary School Principals.
CROMER, director of com-
munications for the District of Colum-
bia Public Schools, was author of a
similar survey of student attitudes in
1974.
In eight areas - drugs, education,
work, politics, choice of friends,
religion, sex and dress styles - a
majority of students said they agreed
with their parents' views, her report
said.
"While significant numbers of
today's students say their parents are
'old-fashioned' or 'too strict,' when it
comes to more substantive issues such,
as politics, sex, drugs, religion and

,careers, young people appear to have
increasingly adopted the views of their
parents," the survey concluded.
The students said the most important
problems facing America were unem-
ployment, inflation and violent crime.
In 1974, at a time when the Watergate
scandal was reaching a climax, the top
domestic problems were listed as
politics and the environment. That year
only 4 percent of high school students
said violent crime was a problem.
The biggest challenges facing the
world are nuclear disaster, the threat of
World War III and poverty, the students
said.
"IN THE 60's, students were charac-
terized as having long hair. They were
involved in protests. They mistrusted
anyone over 30," Cromer said. "In the
'70s they were described as the 'me'
generation," were preoccupied with
careers and making money and "had a
strong aversion to politics."
The report, commenting on how
today's students differ from their
predecessors, said that "unlike the
more vocal youth of 20 years ago,
issuing a hue and cry over public issues
is seemingly not part of today's student
disposition.

Four Shiite Moslem gunmen rush
"Green Line" in Beirut yesterday.

Defense research approved

(Continued from Page 1)
dsall's work to aid in anti-submarine
warfare and to improve America's fir-
st-strike capabilities.
THE REJECTION -Only the eighth
since the Classified Research Review
Panel was formed in 1972 - sent the
proposals to another committee which
rarely takes part in decisions on
classified projects. In an 8-4 vote on
March 9, the Research Policies Com-
mittee decided the projects did not
violate the guidelines.
"I made the decision based on my
own judgement but the committee's
endorsement was a permanent con-
sideration," Sussman said yesterday.
Freedman, who resigned from the
classified panel after the March 9 vote,
said Birdsall's work could help put the
United States in a first strike position in
a nuclear war. With the aid of research
like Birdsall's, Freedman said the
United States will be able to pinpoint
the location of Soviet submarines, while

keeping its own fleet relatively hidden.
THE U.S. EDGE in submarine
technology would lessen America's
vulnerability to a Soviet attack, and
might induce it to strike first, she ex-
plained in a paper after she opposed the
projects.
Birdsall has maintained that his
research can be used to track sub-
marines, but has civilian uses as well.
In February, the Progressive Student
Network attempted a sit-in at Birdsall's
North Campus laboratory, which failed
when University security officials lear-
ned of the plan beforehand.
Afterward, Birdsall said his projects
can be used not only by the Pentagon,
but also by the Weather Service and
fishermen. "But none of the others are
willing to pay for it," he said.
I will be interviewing on March 30 for
day camp counselors in the Chicago area
CIRCLE-M DAY CAMP
MAKE APPOINTMENTS THROUGH
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
-Marcy Brower

SUMMER JOBS AT
TAMARACK
Brighton, and Ortonville, Michigan -
Camp Kennedy, Agree Outpost, Teen Trips
Positions still available for:
cabin counselors * specialists in arts & crafts, waterfront & small
crafts, campcraft-nature, trip leading, ROPES course, sports,
horseback riding, drama-dance, photography, video, computers
* unit and specialist supervisors " nurses " physicians " secretary
* food service staff * maintenance assistants " bus drivers
Also opportunities to work with emotionally impaired
children at Silverman Village
INTERVIEWING APRIL 4 AND 10
SIGN-UP: CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
Tamarock is the Jewish residential camp sponsored by the
Fresh Air Society of Metropolitan Detroit, since 1903
6600 W. Maple Rd., W. Bloomfield, MI 48003 " 313/661-0600

* Voting problems plague MSA election

(Continued from Page1)
p.m.; the Dana Building from 10 a.m.-3
p.m.; the Dental Building from 9 a.m.-2
p.m.; the Taubman Medical Library
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; the School of
Education building, from 10 a.m.-2
p.m.; Lorch Hall from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.;
the East Engineering building from
8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; the Business School
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; the MLB from 8
a.m.-3 p.m.: the North Campus
Commons from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; the Fish
MATH (MAJORSIMINORSI
APTITUDE)...
You're Needed All
Over the World.
Ask Peace Corps Moth volunteers why
their degrees are needed in the dass-
rooms of the world's developing notions.
Ask them why ingenuity and flexibility
ore as viral as adopting to a differentcul-
ture. They'll rell you their students know
Math is the key to a solid future. And
they'll rell youthat Peace.Corps odds up
to a career experience full of rewards
and accomplishments. Ask them why
Peace Corps is the roughest job you'll
ever love.
PEACE CORPS

Bowl from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; the Union
from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; West Quad from 4
p.m.-6:30 p.m.; South Quad from 4-6:30
p.m.; East Quad from 4:30-6:30 p.m.;
Bursley from 4:15-6:30 p.m.; Couzens
from 4:30-6:45 p.m.; UGLi from 3-5

p.m.; Markley from 4-6:30 p.m;
Mosher Jordan from 4-6:30 p.m.; and
Alice Lloyd from 4-6:30 p.m.
Daily reporter Claudia Green filed a
report for this story.

AL TER NA TI PE CAREE R FAIR
WORKING FOR A C/ANGE
FRIDAY MARCH 30 8-10PM
AND
SATURDAY MARCH 31 10AM-6PM
EAST QUADRANGLE
CAREER WORKSHOPS AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS ON:
EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY ART/THEATRE
LABOR SOCIAL SERVICES ORGANIZING
HEALTH SERVICES COOPS/BUSINESS
MEDIA LAW/GOVERNMENT
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TO REPRESENT YOU-
MICHIGAN
STUDENT
ASSEMBLY
needs more than Your money

e a.

CALL YOUR FRIENDS!

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BLOOM C
IS IN

ALERT THE PRESS!

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March 27th & 28th

JOIN THE MILO'S MEADOW

GANG EVERY DAY .. .

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