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March 23, 1984 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*#

Men's Club Lacrosse
vs. Purdue
Sunday, 2:00 p.m.
Tartan Turf

SPORT'S

The Michigan Daily

Friday, March 23, 1984

NETTER RELINQUISHES PRO HOPES:

Laser leads Blue

In

'84,

By ADAM MARTIN
Ho s been all over the world, but he's
still Wolverine. He's had visions of the
pros, but he's got a job to do this season.
He is RossLaser, captain of the
men's tennis team.
IN HIS three years at Michigan,
Laser's had his ups and downs, but
that's all behind him now. As captain,
Laser plans to help Michigan to its 17th
consecutive Big Ten title - on and off
the court.
Things weren't always so concrete,
however.
Until several months ago, Laser was
seriously considering professional ten-
nis.= He played in two summer pro
Satellite circuits in several different
countries, thinking and doing what
young pros do.
THE SATELLITE circuit is a step
down from the Grand Prix (the main
circuit for professionals), but it is a way
t it young pros can accumulate

Association of Tennis Professionals
(ATP) points, which are imperative to
receive world ranking. Laser came
away from the circuit with experience
and a few critical realizations.
"I played well and 'got" experience,"
said Laser, but "(The Satellite circuit)
made me realize how tough it is to
make it in pro tennis, how vast tennis
really is.
"There comes a time that you have to
realize where your future is going. I
realized it's not in tennis."
DESPITE recognizing his slim op-
portunity for a career in tennis, the
Lincolnwood, Ill. native still has the
blood of a professional, albeit not type
McEnroe or Connors.
"If I could make a lot of money
playing tennis," Laser said, "I couldn't
think of a better life, but it's difficult to
make a lot of money in tennis unless
you're one of the top players in the
world. I don't see myself that way, un-

fortunately."
There are other reasons Laser has
opted away from the pros, other than
coming to grips with his chance (or lack
thereof)efor a successful, lucrative ten-
nis career.
"MY OTHER opportunities outweigh
the future potential that I have for suc-
cess in tennis," he said. Included on,
that list are his interests in law school,
real estate and trading commodities.
For now, though, Laser is setting his
future aside and concentrating on
leading the team, something that
requires an experienced,
knowledgeable player. His ups and
downs and leveling-offs of years past
make him that kind of player.
Said Laser, "I've been through it all,
I know the ways of the world."
LASER'S ROLE as leader figures to
be critical this season because
Michigan is basically a young, inex-
perienced squad.
"We have a young, emotional team,"
he said, "and they need a lot of coun-
seling and reinforcement, continuously.
I'm' the person that the guys on the
team turn to. I've been an' all-
encompassing friend."
SOPHOMORE Hugh Kwok said,
"Ever since I've been here, I've been

able to talk to (Laser). He'll go out of
his way to help. He's the captain, and
(the team) relies on him."
Freshman Todd Cohen echoed
Kwok's sentiments. "(Ross) is a good
leader. He's got a lot of experience, and
he gives us confidence. He's doing a
great job."
Coach Brian Eisner, who has coached
Laser for three years, sees this season's
captain's role as essential because of
the lack of upperclassmen on the team.
"HE'S TAKEN on a dramatic leader-
ship role," said Eisner. "We only have
two seniors on this team (Laser and
Rodd Schreiber). Ross is often a
spokesman for the players, he sees
what't going on."
But by maintaining, as Laser put it, a
role "greater than any captain or per-
son in the history of Michigan tennis,"
one would think Laser's game would
suffer. But Laser stressed that when
his leadership role affects his perfor-
mance, "the big-brother job goes to the
coach."
Still, Laser is coping nicely with his
integral duties, and he is well aware of
his priorities.
"This season is my last hurrah. I
want to go out with a bang, not a whim-
per, he said.

Ii I

y
Ar
'p.
l'

AMERICAN
AN INDEPENDENT COLLEGE
9OLLEGE
TS AND SCIENCES
I11 PARIS
UNE F4'ULTE AMERICAINE
1984
SUMMER SESSION
June 18-July-7
Courses in:

Art History
International Business
Administration
Computer Science

Economic
European h-litics
French Languqe
& Literature

Although he won't be pla
will be the on- and off-cou
SPORTS OF THEJ
'M'-nin
to Main
Special to the Dail
Things aren't quite work
the Michigan baseball team
Despite a late surge, the
succumbed to the University
10-9, in the first game of
header yesterday in the Jp4
Tournament, and were lam]
2, by Miami of Ohio in the nig
IN THE first contest, Micl
into the seventh inning traili
Mike Waters beat out a bun
third base line and score
Hayward's homer into th
screen. Rich Bair and Casey
hit back-to-back doubles
Minick pulled Michigan eve
first round-tripper of the sea
,In the bottom of the inning
moved from first base to k
but quickly gave up the w
when Rick Lashua knocked
pitch into the left field scree
Bair had a perfect game
with two doubles and t%
Minick singled and home
scoring twice.

Men's Tennis
vs. WMU
Saturday, 6:00 p.m.
Track and Tennis Building
Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Lying professional tennis in Lhe future, Ross Laser
rt general for the Wolverines this season.
DAILY:
e sugee1mb,
ie and Miaii
y THE SECOND game wasn't nearly as
ing out for close or exciting as the opener.
in Texas. Miami's Scott Arnold, a senior right-
Wolverines hander, no-hit the Wolverines until two
y of Maine, out in the sixth inig. Michigan then
a double- g~ot its first runi as Waters singled to
dy Ramsey right and came around on singles by
bse,13 awr adBi.1
basted, 1-HThe Wolverines ended the scoring in
gtanp.n the seventh. After singling to left, Close
n9-4 wen took third on Hal Morris' double and
it down the scored when Chuck Froning knocked a
Dd on Ken sacrifice fly to center.
e left-field Michigan sihpped to 1-4 the toure
y Close then nament at Edinburg, Texas and 2-5
and Jeff overall. Maine and Miami upped their
en with his records to 6-12 and 4-5, respectively.,
son. Larkin inJury not serious
, Hayward An injury to Wolverines' shortstop
the mound, Barry Larkin, suffered in Wednesday's
his Rseon second game against Pan American
ised was diagnosed yesterday as a sprain.
ga The inljury suf fere d as Larkin
ao singplae pivoted toward second base following
; w e tghes.an overthrow at fito be a fracture. The
nred, while ophomore will miss at least two weeks
of action and is now using crutches.
Wsomen nfl tters y1 WMU
The MichiganWomen'sT1ennis team
will take on Western Michigan this af-
ternoon in Kalamazoo. The Wolverines
are coming off a decisive win over
Calvin College on Wednesday, and hope
to make it three wins in a row with a

victory over WMU.
Mary Mactaggart will lead the team
in the first singles slot. Mactaggart will
be pitted against Western's sophomore
sensation Amy Yeast, who has earned a
10-4 record so far this season. Overall,
WMU has gained a 9-5 win-loss tally;
while the Michigan squad is 4-6.
ance. Today's match at Kalamazoo is an
important primer for a tough road
schedule for the Wolverines. Although
they are expected to defeat Western
with little difficulty, the team will then
face' higher caliber opponents as it
begins playing the thick of the Big 10
foes.
The match at Kalamazoo will begin
at 2:00 p.m. The team will not play at
home again until it hosts Ohio State on
April 14.
-SANDY PINCUS
Is - thisweek
m, Tv - /5

Seminar Tours in:

French Cultural History
June 1-19

Dance History
June 23 - July 8

For a brochure, please write to:
Summer Session Director
AMERICAN COLLEGE IN PARIS
P.O. BOX 115D, DEMAREST, N.J. 07627
France's only fully accredited four-year
independent American college

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