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March 23, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Teachers arrested,
for child molesting

The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 23, 1984 - Page 3
Lawyer defends
press at MLB

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LOS ANGELES AP - Five teachers He said the five defendants, in-
t a suburban pre-school were arrested cluding three relatives of the school's
Psterday following their indictment on founder, Virginia McMartin, allegedly
. total of 19 counts of felony child obtained the silence of their victims -
nolestation involving an estimated 10 who were as young as two - by
tudents over a 10-year period, the threatening to harm their parents.
listrict attorney said. "In order to back those threats, small
"We're talking about rape, sodomy, animals were actually slaughtered in
ral copulation and fondling," District their (the victims') presence,"
ttorney Robert Philibosian told a Philibosian said.
ews conference regarding yesterday's A Superior Court arraignment was
ndictments of the instructors from .the expected this morning, the district at-
iow-defunct McMartin School in the torney added. he noted that the in-
ceanside community of Manhattan vestigation was continuing.
each.
HEAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Frank Wilkinson, executive director Emeritus of the national committee
against repressive legislation, will speak tonight at 8 at 1006 Lincoln St. on
"Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in the Reagan Era."
Films
Alternative Action - A Thousand Clowns, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
AAFC - Sophie's Choice, 6:30 & 9:15 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Two - The State of Things, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Aud A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild - The Sea Wolf, 7 p.m., Key Largo, 9 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Mediatrics - Manhattan, 7:15 & 9 p.m., MLB4.
Performances
School of Music Opera Hansel & Gretel, 8 p.m.,Power Center.
School of Music - Flute recital, Lynn Zimmerman, 8 p.m., Recital, Meir
Rimon, Lois Stout, & horn ensemble, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; Piano chamber
music, 8 p.m., Recital Hall; and Rehearsal Hall.
PTP - "Children," a play by A.R. Gurney, 8 p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
Major Events - Concert, The Temptations & The Four Tops, 7:30 p.m.,
Hill Aud.
Ark -Concert, "Eclectricity,"8 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
East Quad Music Coop - Concert, "Ticklin' the Ivories," 9:30 p.m., Half-
Way Inn.
Residential College - Dance Concert, "Almost Walking," 8 p.m.,
Residential College Aud., E. Quad.
Ann Arbor Recreation Department - "Cinderella," 7 p.m., Pioneer High
School.
Speakers
Latin American Solidarity Committee-"Guatemala: Military Dictators
Against Indigenous Cultures," Victor Perera, 8 p.m., Assembly Rm.,
Michigan Union.
Center for Afroamerican & African Studies-"A Woman Writer Looks
,Back Through her Mothers," Visiting Regents Professor Paule Marshalle, 4
p.m., Lee. Rm. 2, MLB. "Developmental Policies & Their Consequences in
the Near East & North Africa," 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Guild House-Women's lives series, Carol Hollenshead, administrative
director of the School of Nursing, noon, 802 Monroe.
HRD-"Introduction to Text Editor," 2 p.m., 1439 Mason Hall.
Center for Gender Research-Brown Bag, "Chilean Women Struggling for
Democracy," Ximena Bunster, 12:10 p.m., 603 E. Madison.
Anthropology-"Indians of Guatemala: Genocide or Extinction," Victor
Perera, 4p.m., Union.
Architecture & Urban Planning-"The Downtown Detroit People Mover,"
Gary Drause, 3 p.m., Rm. 4050 LSA Bldg.
Chenfistry-"Nucleic Acid base Grafted Polyethylenimine:
Polynucleotide Analog & Therapeutic Agent," 3 p.m., Rm. 1300 Chem. Bldg.
Astronomy-"Life in the Universe: Are We Alone?" 8:30 p.m., Aud. B,
Angell Hall.
Residential College-"Education and the Search for a Radical Discour-
se," Henry Giroux, 4 p.m., Rm. 124 E. Quad.
Meetings
Korean Christian Fellowship-Bible Study, 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class-7:30 p.m.University Reformed Church.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship-8 p.m., Third Floor Trotter
House.
Miscellaneous
Flame waves-Free meditation workshops, 7:30 p.m., Rm. C., third floor,
Michigan League.
HRD - "Written Communications Seminar," Mary Bromage, 9 a.m., Rm.
130 LSA Bldg.
Duplicate Bridge Club - Pairs game, 7:15 p.m., for location call 668-1048.
Museum of Art-"Art Break," Barbara Krause, "Salon Painting vs. The
New Way," 12:10 p.m., Alumni Memorial Hall.
Muslim Student Association-Discussion, 9 p.m., 407 N. Ingalls.
Folk Dance Club - Teaching 8-9:30 p.m. Request dancing 9:30 p.m.-
midnight, Third Floor Dance Studio, corner of State & Williams Streets.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Room.
Union - M ovie Poster exhibition sale, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Michigan Union.
Art Museum -Exhibit, "Trends and Traditions in Japanese Art," Art
Museum.

Doily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Floyd Abrams, a nationally acclaimed media defense attorney, speaks
about the legal aspects of journalism before about 250 people at the MOdern
Languages Building yesterday.I

By RANDI HARRIS
"The glory days of the press are
over," Floyd Abrams, a nationally ac-
claimed media defense lawyer told a
crowd of about 250 in the Modern
Languages Building yesterday.
But that does not mean that jour-
nalists should stop believing in the im-
portance of their mission or the
necessity of special legal protections
for the press, he said.'
MANY OF THE top names in jour-
nalism have begun to do just that, he
said, citing James Lehrer of the Mc-
Neil-Lehrer Report, and New York
Times Columnist Anthony Lewis. Both
men have criticized the press deman-
ding special legal protections beyond
what most of society's institutions
receive.
"The press is in grave trouble with it-
self," Abrams said. "There has been
serious criticism from the press.
The New York attorney was the third
annual Kenneth Murray lecturer. Spon-
sored by the communications depar-
- tment, the lecture investigates a First
Amendment issue each year.
Abrams has spent his life defending
many newspapers and journalists. He
was co-dounsel in the Pentagon Papers
case in the early '70s and has argued
before the Supreme Court several
times.
HE TOLD THE crowd that many
journalists who are criticizing the press
from within are overreacting to a
recent trend of criticism from the rest
of society.
Subletters
-must be
wary
(Continued from Page 1)
percent to 70 percent of its full price.
Rumsey said that the only way to
temper this loss is put signs and ads out
early as possible and hope to find a
subletter who doesn't want to take a
chance on waiting.

Several recent polls have shown a
high level of distrust in the press among
the public .and many articles and
columns, including a cover story in
Time magazine, hav4 highlighted the
problem.
The intensity of this criticism has
shaken the confidence of many jour-
nalists, left them a bit confused, and
made them less willing to defend them-
selves, Abrams said.
BUT THIS IS the time when it is most
important for the press to defend itself
and its function in society, he said...
"The press does the least good when it
accepts most complacently the
criticism it receives."
Instead, journalists should continue
to do their job their job of questioning
the theories, plans, and actions of the
nation's leaders. And they should not
shy away from pointing out that they
are different from . other institutions
and therefore deserve special legalf,
protections under the First Amen-
dment, Abrams concluded.
"By posing as just another in-
stitution, they won't win any friends,
they will only be treated like any other
institution," he said.

Ed Meese
requests
prosecutor
WASHINGTON (UPI) - White
House counselor Edwin Meese defian-
tly called ,for the appointment of a
special prosecutor yesterday to settle
allegations stalling his confirmation as
attorney general - a process that could
take months.
President Reagan also dug in his
heels, pledging he will not withdraw his
nomination of Meese - "my trusted
colleague for 17 years" - and ex-
pressing confidence an independent
inquiry would clear his aide.
THE SENATE Judiciary Committee
has delayed its hearings on Meese's
selection as the nation's top law enfor-
cement officer pending the results of a
preliminary Justice Department in-
vestigation of possible financial
irregularities involving Meese.
The probe was sparked by disclosure
of a $15,000 interest-free loan to Meese,
an arrangement burdened with over-
tones of cronyism.
In a letter to Attorney General
William French Smith, the man he
hopes to succeed, Meese asked Smith
to immediately seek court appointment
of a special prosecutor under the Ethics
in Government Act.
Smith promptly huddled with his top
advisers to discuss what to do.

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