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March 18, 1984 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-18

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Ninety-four Years
of
Editorial Freedom

E

La1

~~Iai1

Pushy
Cloudy and windy, with a chance
of snow flurries. High near 36.

Vol. XCIV-No. 133 Copyright 1984, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Sunday, March 18, 1984 Fifteen Cents Eight Pages

Six arrested,
two injured in
neo-Nazi rally

State
leads

Win
sweep

By ERIC MATTSON
and CAROLINE MULLER
Six people were arrested and two
police officers suffered minor in-
juries yesterday when protesters
clashed with 11 neo-Nazis holding a
rally on the steps of the Federal
Building.
The rally by members of the S.S.
Action Group began around 3:00
yesterday afternoon, two hours
later than scheduled and four
hours after about 60 demonstrators
gathered at City Hall to protest the
neo-Nazis presence.
NEO-NAZIS represent the
modern version of Hitler's party of
the 1930s and '40s.
According to leader John Reich
(whose name is a pseudonym), the
neo-Nazis demonstrate every year
in Ann Arbor "because Com-
munists are trying to take over
and destroy this city. It's just
sickening and we're not going to
tolerate this," he said.
A scuffle broke out shortly after
the neo-Nazis began their rally
when a counter-demonstrator,
shouting "you're a goddam killer,".
began to hit one of the neo-Nazis.
POLICE officers wrestled the at-
'tacker to the ground, and as other
scuffles began to break out the of-
ficers escorted the Nazis to a
parking lot behind the building and
put them on a police bus. Six coun-
ter-demonstrators were arrested
on charges ranging from disor-
derly conduct to assault and bat-
tery.

THIS YEAR'S demonstration
was much smaller than the rally
two years ago when a crowd of
1,200 ran from City Hall to the
Federal Building to confront a
small group of neo-Nazis. The neo-
Nazis avoided counter-demon-
strators last year by rallying two
hours before they were scheduled
to appear.
Yesterday, many of the anti-
Nazi demonstrators - made up of
the United Community Against the
Nazis (UCAN), the Progressive
Labor Party and International
Communists against Racism -
went home after waiting in the cold
since 11:00 a.m.
CARRYING signs saying
"Death to the Nazis" and "Smash
Racism," the counter-demon-
strators paraded outside of City
Hall for four long, cold hours
yesterday afternoon.
The 60 demonstrators, organized
by UCAN and the Revolutionary
Workers League, gathered in
hopes of deterring the neo-Nazi
party members from rallying.
"We will not sit quietly by," said
UCAN spokesperson Don Rogers.
"We will oppose (the Nazis) in
whatever form they appear, until
they disappear."
"WEre here to physically stop
the Nazis," said PLP member
Calvin Turner.
At one point during the rally,
See VIOLENCE, Page 2

for Mondaile

From United Press International
Walter Mondale, declaring he had
scored "a national victory," put his
Democratic presidential candidacy
back on track Saturday, winning the
Michigan and Arkansas caucuses and
leading narrowly in Mississippi.
Civil rights activist Jesse Jackson
made his best showing of the year in
South Carolina, where he was born,
beating Mondale, but trailing a
majority vote for uncommitted
delegates. In Mississippi, Jackson was
close behind Mondale.
SEN. GARY Hart of Colorado was
winless in the six caucuses that picked
251 national convention delegates.
Mondale won with the aid of a big labor
vote in Michigan and the help of
traditional Democrats in Arkansas.
Mondale was jubilant, declaring,
"This is a national victory for us."
Long lines were reported at various
polling spots around Michigan, with
candidate supporters - armed with
literature and rhetoric - giving voters
last-minute pitches as they waited in
line.
OFFICIALS estimated 200,000 voters
turned out in the race that was expected
ito draw only 100,000.
Joel Ferguson, co-chairman of the
Jackson campaign, said that in some
1 places "the lines were so long we star-
ted feeding people.., so they wouldn't:
get discouraged."
Squabbling broke out among the
political camps, with Ellen Globokar,
Mondale's state director complaining
that credit card recipts were accepted
in the Ann Arbor area as identification.
ERNIE KESSLER a memeber - of
Hart's Michigan organization, charged
that $3 dollar tickets to a beer party
were given free to those voting for
Mondale at a site in Jackson County.

The practice was stopped when hart
backers protested, he said.
At stake in michigan were 136 of the
251 delegates to be chosen yesterday in
Michigan, Arkansas, Mississippi, South
Carolina and the Panama Canal Zone.
In Kentucky the first three of 120 coun-
ties held caucuses that finish March 31
A heavy uncommitted vote in
Mississippi and South Carolina in-
dicated that in the volatile 1984 election
year some Democrats could not see a
clear front-runner and were biding
their time.
MONDALE won 65 delegates yester-
day, Hart 40 and Jackson 12 in returns
see MONDALE, Page 2
Hart bea ts
Mondale
in county
By NEIL CHASE
Sen. Gary Hart did not win the
Michigan caucus, but did capture4i
percent of the votes cast in Washtenaw
County yesterday. Former vice pr.,
esident Walter Mondale received 31.
percent, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson
received 16.
Two hundred twenty votes, most of
which were for . Hart, were excluded
from the totals because they were
challenged, according to Sheila CotfFr-
berworth, county caucus director.
MOST OF the challenged ballots
belonged to voters whose qualification
See HART, Page 2

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB

Ann Arbor Police Detective Richard Anderson wrestles with an unidentified protester who
knocked down the Nazi lying on the ground during yesterday's Nazi rally at the Federal
Building. Anderson was one of the two officers injured during the third annual Nazi rally.

.4 __

Stereotypes are lies, actr

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - Men and women must PUS
abolish stereotypes and lying to them-
selves and each other about who they hou!
are, actress and television producer PhD
Marlo Thomas said yesterday.
Speaking before a crowd of about 1,500
gathered in Cobo Hall for a women's
career conference, Thomas - most
famous for her role in the television
series "That Girl" - encouraged women
to forget traditional ideas which dictate
that girls can't be doctors and boys But the
can't play with dolls, members
SONGS popular 15 years ago, true emoti
Thomas said, portrayed the perfect said. Men
woman dressed in fancy lace and women sh,
doused with perfume. Men, according she added
to the same idea of the times, were sup- "I knom
posed to be physically strong and what (the
technically proficient, she added. powerless
* Lebanese
talks stall,
fig hting
continues.

t-feminism means actresses are dumb,
sewives don't work, nobody loves a
-Mario Thomas
actress and feminist

'ess says
Thomas said.
She warned, however, that a lot of
women are getting tired, saying that
the revolution is over - that it is an era
of post-feminism.
"Post-feminism means actresses are
dumb, housewives don't work, nobody
loves a PhD," Thomas said, adding that
women have to keep pushing or they
will lose ground in overcoming such
stereotypes.
THE NEXT goal that should be ac-
complished by the women's movement,
Thomas said, is to help men feel more
comfortable by allowing them to have
emotions and not take all the respon-
sibility for supporting a family.
The equal rights movement was the
first step insdissolving stereotypes, but
women must be inspired to keep the
movement alive, Thomas said. *And
that inspiration, she said, comes from
See STEREOTYPES, Page 3

se stereotypes have forced
of both sexes to hide their
ions from each other, Thomas
aren't supposed to cry and
ouldn't participate in sports,
.
w all about stereotypes and
y) can do . . . we've all felt
. . . written off," Thomas

said. She added that she had to contend
with the brainless actress stereotype
when she was a young woman trying to
make it on her own and even later in her
early days as the only woman in her
production studio.
THE EQUAL rights movement,
which began 15 years ago, was the first
step in dissolving these stereotypes,

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From AP and UPI
LAUSANNE, Switzerland - Druze Moslem leader
Walid Jumblatt warned yesterday that unless the
Lebanese peace talks agree on "radical reforms"
there will be 10 more years of civil war.
Jumblatt, speaking just before the full conference
resumed after a seven-hour delay, said President
Amin Gemayel ant his father Pierre Gemayel, head
of the Christian Phalange Party, had not yet accepted
the need for a new political system.
"WE WANT radical reforms, we want a new
historical compromise,' Jumblatt said.
"If we don't get it, it means another 10 years of civil
war."
As the negotiators met, their followers in Beirut
clashed in the heaviest fighting since a cease-fire was
imposed on Tuesday. Police said at least 13 people
were killed and 35 wounded in the battles.
WITH AN APPARENT impasse in the negotiations
for a consensus on reform, Syrian Vice President Ab-
dul Halim Khaddam directly intervened by meeting
privately with the key participants, Jumblatt, Amin
Gemayel and Shiite Moslem leader Nabih Berri.

Jumblatt said he was still demanding new elections
'to replace Gemayel, and said there had been no
agreement on any of the major concerns he raised at
the conference.
The Druze leader, accusing Pierre Gemayel of
"still trying to gain time," said it would not be easy to
get the dominant Christians represented by the
Phalange Party to share power.
THE ROLE of Khaddam remained crucial but it
was not clear who the Syrians were pressuring to get
the agreement they have insisted on.
Jumblatt said the Syrians were backing him "on
certain basic and important demands," but gover-
nment officials had earlier expressed the belief that
Khaddam would lean on Jumblatt and Berri in order
to reach an agreement.
"We hope that they will announce a final
agreement on national reconciliation and a plan for
implementing peace in Lebanon tomorrow,"
Gemayel's political adviser, Michel Samaha, said
when the session ended at 104p.m.
The closed-door conference was scheduled to
See LEBANON, Page 3

Day of the Irish AP Photo
Teddy Gleason, head of the International Longshoreman's Union and Grand
Marshal of New York's 223rd St. Patrick's Day parade, is interviewed by a
television reporter yesterday as he marches up Fifth Avenue during the
parade.

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TODAY
Michael mania

with disciplinary action when she wore the singer's
trademark single white glove to school in honor of
Jackson's record eight Grammy awards last month. Don-
nelly said school officials feared that studded belts might be
used as weapons and the gloves could be caught in
machinery in shop class. The dress code prompted 283 of
the school's 625 students to sign a petition in protest. Last
week, 60 students along with 70 parents and teachers
showed up at a school board meeting to back the petition.

wheel, swerving the car across the street into two parked
vehicles. No one, including Bear, was hurt. "The insurance
agent asked me if my dog was a licensed driver,"
Swatlowski said. "I wanted to teach her to waterski this
summer, but if she can't handle the driving, I don't know."
The Daily almanac
N THIS DATE in 1968 the Faculty Assembly voted

* 1958 - University math Prof. H. Chandler DAvis, who
was suspended after being found guilty of contempt
charges in June 1957, said he would appeal his conviction to
the U.S. Circuit Court in Cincinatti. Davis refused to answer
questions during a House -Un-American Subcommittee
hearing on his alleged link to a Communist cell at Harvard
University while he was a graduate student between 1946
and 1950.
* 1974 - Residents on the fourth floor of East Quad's
Hayden house set a new campus record for a marathon

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