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March 16, 1984 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

C 0
Cagers
And it was Tarpley who led the charge
when things looked bleakest.
The Big Ten season was two-thirds
over and Michigan's tournament
outlook did not look rosey. The
Wolverines had just lost five of seven
games to drop their record to 14-9, 6-7 in
the conference. Their journey to
Bloomington to play Bobby Knight's
Hoosiers ended in an embarassing 72-57
loss. With five contests left on the
schedule another loss might have per-
manently damaged their playoff hopes.
Two losses would surely remove them
from NCAA tournament consideration.
A tough road game at Ohio
State-which had defeated Michigan 62-
60 earlier in the year at Ann Arbor,
awaited the Blue.
Enter the unassuming string bean,
Tarpley.
IF EVER the term "unconscious"

could be used to describe the perfor-
maice of one individual, it was that
night in Columbus. Using a variety of
hook shots and baseline jumpers, the 6-
10 center connected on 9-12 shots from
the floor to literally give Michigan a
five-point halftime lead. For good
measure Tarpley sucked in six reboun-
ds and put the clamps on Buckeye All-
American Tony Campbell, holding him
to 1-7 from the field. Frustrated
Buckeye fans asked themselves "Roy
who?" as they watched the budding
star put on a one-man decimation act.
Tarpley finished with 24 points and 12
rebounds and the Wolverines went on to
win, 62-59. The loss effectively knocked
Ohio State out of the NCAA and into the
NIT.
A couple of Columbus sportswriters
entered the press room singing the
words to "New York, New York," the
home of the NIT. Some other spor:
tswriters, who were covering Michigan,
chuckled. Little did they know, they
would soon be joining in the chorus. f

To

0

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tunes.
Echo and the Bunnymen
Clutch Cargo's
St. Andrew's Hall
8 p.m., Thursday; March 22
By Mike Belford
E CHO AND the Bunnymen are a
special band. They're quiet,
unassuming and intelligent, and play
music of such breathtaking power and
beauty that everything else just pales in
comparison.
The band is from Liverpool, a city
with more than its share of rock 'n' roll
images - from John Lennon's Cavern
Club days to the latest wild excesses of
band like Dead or Alive and Frankie
Goes To Hollywood.
Liverpool is a major sea port in Nor-
thern England where former industrial
glories now sadly mingle with poverty,
unemployment and despair in a sorry
mess. I can't imagine a more down to
earth or unromantic city.
The Bunnymen's 1979 debut album
Crocodiles, and the early singles
"Rescue" and "Do it Clean" were a bit-
ter reflection of this environment,

revealing also a growing identification
with the timeless Robert Johnson,
Elmore James rebel blues tradition.
Successive tours through Europe and
to such locations as Africa and the Far
East gradually added to the momentum
and maturity of the band, and by the
time of their early 1981 London concerts
it was clear that nobody else could mat-
ch them in live performance.
A few months later their second
album, the Hugh Jones produced
Heaven Up Here, was released to over-
whelming critical acclaim and com-
mercial success in England. It seemed
at the time as if they could do nothing
wrong.
Echo and the Bunnymen's sub-
sequent problem, however, was that
they couldn't maintain this momentum
or follow with an album the quality of
Heaven Up Here,- which even now
remains largely unmatched. Live con-
certs became more infrequent and un-
predictable and the band released no
new records for over a year. Worse,
they had to stand by and watch other
(and I think grossly inferior) bands like
U2 and Big Country achieve the chart
success in America that they should
have had.
The Bunnymen reemerged last
spring with their third album Por-
cupine - a difficult album for a dif-
ficult time, but one which nevertheless
contained brief glimpses of better days.
This is particularly noted in the songs
"The Cutter", and "In Bluer Skies."
The summer of '83 was good for the
band. They played several sell-out con-
certs at London's Royal Albert Hall,
complete with violin and cello accom-
paniment. They also released the single

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"Never Stop" - a wonderfully bright
up-tempo dance tune.
1984 seems to be continuing the same
way, their recent EP The Killing Moon
was well received in England, andrthe
band has started touring again. For-
tunately the tour includes a road trip
across the U.S.
It will be interesting to see whether
Echo and the Bunnymen's new
material is popular over here, or if they

just retair
following, li
and jazz mi
either case,
as powerful
their eccent
will no doubt
As I said,
them now wh
They proba
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