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March 11, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HAPP NI
SUNDAY
Highlight
Sc ool o Music faculty members perform in a i
works ly Reger, Mohler, Beethoven, and Rachmanin
sored by the University Musical Society, begins a
Auditorium.
IFilms
Cinema Guild - The 22nd Ann Arbor Film Festival
11 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Alternative Action - Born in Flames, 8p.m., Nat. S
Performances
School of Music 2tyni Peithfin, &eflO re if
Professional Theatre Program - Miss Jue 2
Arena, Frieze Bldg.
Ark - Footloose,8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
UAC - Comedy Co. Comedy Troupe, 7:30 p.m.; din
Hillel - One-act play, incident at Vichy, 7:30 p.m.,
Speakers .
llet Foun-dation Henry Feingold, "How Uniqu
2:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Wesley Foundation - Beth Nissen, "The Church an
America," 7 pin., First United Methodist Church, 602
First Presbyterian Church - Rev. Paul Dotson,
9:30 a.m.,1432 Washtenaw.
Miscellaneous
Free University - Workshop, "Subversion of th
p.m., 3361/2 State.
Men's swimming - Wolverine International, 3 p.m
Music Education National Convention - Student
in Our Schools Week," 4 p.m., Recital Hall.
Muslim Students' Association - Islamic educatio
Muslim House, 407 N. Ingalls.
4. MONDAY
Highlight
New Jewish Agenda sponsors a forum for repr
Democratic presidential candidates. Be politically
Pendleton Room of the Union at 7:30 p.m.
Films.
Cinema Guild - Throne of Blood, 7 p.m., Lorch.
AAFC - The Given Word, 8 p.m., MLB 1.
Speakers
Near Eastern & North African Studies - Brown b
ternational Youth Year in Oman, 1983," noon, Lane H
Chemistry - Danae Christodoulou, "Coordina
Synthesis by Template Reactions & Recent Chemist
Neuroscience - Reveca Anderson,r Tbe Pki a1
I n ~.i40579MHBRI. mnrg'i 1..
Great Lakes & Marine Environment -Sallie
Regulation in Marine Phytoplankton" 4 p.m., White
Meetings
Society for Creative Anachronism -8 p.m For m
4290.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 6 p.m., CCRB Mart
Turner Geriatric Clinic - Intergenerational Wom
WallSt-
Asian American Assocation - 6:30 p.m., Trotter H
Human Growth Center- Eating disorder self-hel
Hogback Rd;, -13.
Miscellaneous
Eclipse Jazz - workshop in Jazz Improvisation
musicians, 7 pim:, Assembly Hall, Union.

Hillel Foundation - Panel discussion, "Contem
Holocaust," 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
School of Music - Composers forum, 8 p.m., Recit
Guild House - Poetry Readings, Laynie Deutsch
p.m.,802 Monroe.
SYDA Foundation - Meditation class, "Love Wit
Hill.
CEW - Classes in reading effectiveness, study s
350 S. Thayer. For more information call 763-1353.
Performance Network - Staged play reading
Yaroslavl, Mozart & Salieri, 7 p.m., 408 Washington.
HRD - Joyce Morgan/Maria Hunsberger, "W+
On,".1-4 p.m., Administrative Services, Rm.1050.
Washtenaw Community College - panel discuss
You: A Practical Look at Your New Telephone Cho
Theatre, 4800 E. Huron River Rd.

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NGS-
free concert featuring
off. The concert, spon-
t 4 p.m. in Rackham
Winner's Night, 7, 9 &
ci.
" n fteital HALl
p.m., New Trueblood
ner, 6 p.m., U-Club.
1420 Hill.
te was the Holocaust?"
d Revolution in Central
2E. Huron.
'Prospects for Peace,"
e War Powers Act," 2
., Matt Mann Pool.
chapter recital, "Music
n in England, 10 a.m.,
esentatives of the five
aware - come to the
ag, Peter Witteree, "In-
fall Commons.
ited AZA-Macrocycles-
ry" 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Chisholm, "Cell Cycle
Aud., Cooley.
ore information call 996-
ial Arts Rm.
en's Group, 10 a.m., 1010
ouse,1443 Washtenaw.
p group, 7:30 p.m., 2002
for intermediate level
nporary Lessons of the
al Hall.
and Lemuel Johnson, 8
hout Fear," 8 p.m., 1522

kills, academic writing,
s, The Matchmaker of
rord Processors, Hands
sion, "The Breakup and
ices," 7:30 p.m., College

Women have
By NAOMI SAFERSTEIN assertive. E
Women in today's job market have a competitive job at the ri
edge over men, according to Detroit News Film critic " YOU H
Susan Stark, the featured speaker yesterday at the manipulati
Women's Career Fair. 'enlightene
"It's sort of a protracted adolescence," Stark said. Anotherf
"Women now have a career advantage for at least juggling a
the next three to five years, or until the imbalance of jugglingdr
men and women is more head to head." two childri
MARIA HUNSBERGER, an organizer of yester- well.
day's conference at the Modern Language Building, there are c
warns that despite the advantages .that women
currently enjoy, discrimination still exists in the job me. But t
market. weeks of
"You're trying to change the norm of behavior together. B
that's been around for hundreds of years, and it again," Sta
doesn't change quickly, no matter how loud you yell," For a w
Hunsberger said. willing to s
Stark told the crowd that to be successful, a woman work, she s
must be determined, hard working, and above all, "WHEN

edge
Being assertive can include"
ght time."
AVE to be shrewd," Star
on in our own behalf. I li
d self-interest."'
problem for working women
career and a family. Stark, t
en, says she understands ti
Jdren and I have an unders
ertain times when they won't
:hese times are often follow
vacation, where we're c
By then, they're ready to g
ark said.
oman to achieve success,
eparate herself from her fa.
aid.
I WAS pregnant, befor

Tests find poison
in Iranian soldiers

VIENNA, Austria (AP) - Tests on
wounded Iranian soldiers show "with
certain proof" the men were stricken
by mustard gas and "yellow rain," a
physician, said yesterday. Iran had
repeatedly accused Iraq of using the
banned weapons in the Persian Gulf
war.
Iraq has issued several denials of the
allegation.
DR. HERBERT Mandl said
laboratory tests on two of 10 Iranian
fighters under hospital treatment in
Vienna revealed traces of mustard gas
and mycotoxin, a poison derived from
fungi commonly referred to as "yellow
rain."
Such chemical weapons are banned
for use in warfare under the 1925
Geneva Protocol.
A State Department spokesman said
last week the United States has known
since last year of the use of chemical
weapons by Iraq in the 31/2-year-old
war, but Mandl's statements represen-
ted the most specific detailing of the
charge so far.
MANDL, WHO is treating the
Iranians, said that the tests were per-
formed by the Toxicological Institute of
Ghent, a prominent poison research

center in Belgium.
He said high concentrations of both
poisons were "determined with certain
proof" in specimens of urine, feces and
blood taken from the two Iranians un-
der treatment at Vienna's Second Un-
iversity Clinic.
Mandl said "no specific antidote is
known" for exposure to either
chemical.
HE SAID doctors can develop an ap-
proach to treating external and internal
burns and other injuries caused by
mustard gas - which was first used
during World War I.
However, yellow rain in "completely
unknown" to the medical profession,
said another attending physician, Ger-
not Pauser. "It's use is unique, and
should there be a medicine against it we
don't know it," he said.
Symptoms of yellow rain exposure
include bleeding from the nose, mouth
and intestines, nausea, skin rash, sleep
disorders and a decline in the body's
ability to protect against disease.
TEN IRANIANS were flown to Vien-
na on March 2 with afflictions that in-
cluded burned skin, lung disorders and
a gradual destruction of blood cor-
puscles and bone marrow.

The Michigan Daily - Sunday, March 11, 1984- Page 3
in job iarket
taking a bad obstetrician, I had a woman lined up to take care of
my child."
k said. "It's For Stark working without not feeling guilty for
ke to call it being away from home comes easily because her
mother w as aliso a ca reer wom an.
S:tark says, s "A friend pointed eu to me the difference of being
the mother of a first or scond geeraion \working woman" Stark
hat dilemma said. "I didn't e t a her who made soup and
peanut butter sandw ches. She was a lousy cook. You
tanding that wouldn't want to eat her pemaut butter sandwiches
see much of even if she did make them. I never had to deal with
ed by three the guilt of not being a housewife. I never expected to
continuously be one, so I didn't have to break away."
et rid of me The conference brought together women in the
community to give themi an opportunity to enhance
she must be their career development, s a id Meryl Pollaner, an
mily while at organizer of the fair. The fair was designed to bring
career women together, to share experiences and
e I had an serve as role models.

Abandon ship

AP Photo

Firefighters exit from the forward hatch of the smoke-filled cruise ship
Scandinavian Sea yesterday at Port Canaveral, Via. The'506-foot ship caught
fire Friday night as it was ending a short cruise. Officials say that an
electrical short circuit mayhave caused the fire.

Heavy fighting claims fourteen lives in Beirut

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From AP and UPI
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Heavy fighting
raged through most quarters of the
capital yesterday and an artillery shell
slammed into a clinic, killing seven
people. Political leaders went to a con-
ference in Switzerland to try to "put an
end to Lebanon's agonies."
Fourteen people were killed, in-
cluding four Lebanese army soldiers,
and dozens were wounded in the
fighting yesterday, police said.
BY NIGHTFALL, barrages of ar-
tillery and mortar fire battered much of
east and west Beirut, as well as both its
Christian and Moslem suburbs, police
said.

In the predominantly Shiite Moslem
southern suburbs, officials at the Al
Zahraa Hospital said seven people were
killed and at least 22 were injured when
a shell struck a medical clinic.
Officials at the hospital, .where vice-
tims from the clinic were taken, said
some of the casualties were children
who had been waiting for treatment.
The officials declined to be identified.
A FIELD hospital near the Sabra and
Chatilla Palestinian refugee camps
came under fire yesterday, with an un-
determined number of injuries.
Police reported heavy exchanges of
fire along the "green line" frontier
between Christian east and mostly

Moslem west Beirut. At times all sec-
tions along the front were engaged in
the fighting, which pitted the Lebanese
army against Syrian-backed Shiite and
Druse militiamen.
Efforts to arrange a cease-fire were
under way, and state-run Beirut radio'
said Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel called Syrian President Hafez
Assad by telephone during the day and
"exchanged views on efforts to close
Lebanese ranks."
HOWEVER, THE Voice of Lebanon
radio run by rightist Christian factions
said the fighting spread after dark to
the central mountains east of Beirut.
The radio said army positions at the
Frances McDonnell, spokeswoman for
the lottery, noting that 10.8 million
tickets had been sold through Friday
night. The state's population is only 5.7
million.

strategic mountain town of Souk el-
Gharb came under attack and were
returning to fire.
A fter his call. to Assad, Gemayel
pir, ra stopovers in Paris and Geneva,
Switzerland, before arriving Monday inl
Lausanne, Switzerland, for the start of
a national reconciliation conference,
according to Lebanon state television.
The conference was part of an
arrangement Gemayel and Assad
worked out in talks in Damascus at the
beginning of March. As part of the
agreement, Gamayel gave up
Lebanon's troop withdrawal pactwith
Israel, and Syria pledged to help bring
to an end the renewed Lebanese war.
"People are buying up to 50 or 60
tickets at a shot," said Ed Bookman,
owner of Schubert's Smoke Shop and
News. "Business is up three to four
times more than usual."

Winner of
lottery gets
record
jackpot
join the
Daily
News Staff!

BOSTON (UPI) -- Aspiring multi-
millionaires jammed stores yesterday
- only hours before the drawing - for
a 2 million-to-i shot at the Megabucks
jackpot of an expected $18 million, the
biggest lottery prize in American
history.
At 10 p.m., lottery officials planned to
draw the winning six numbers with all
three Boston stations televising the
event, but spokesmen said it will be
early today before the computer
determines whether there is a winner.
"It's really mind boggling," said
POETRY READING
with
LAYNIE DEUTSCH
LEMUEL JOHNSON
of the
8:00 p.m. GUILD HOUSE
MONDAY, MARCH 12 802 Monroe

i

To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Malicitous intent
s

1~
S.

The Quest for the Kingdom of God
LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS ON ANCIENT AND CURRENT QUESTS FOR CARING HUMAN COMMUNITY
I. BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVES
MARCH 12: "PROPHETS AND PROPHECY, LEARNING FROM THE PAST FOR THE PRESENT"
SPEAKER: Dr. David N. Freedman, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor
of Biblical Studies; Director, Studies in Religion,
University of Michigan
MARCH 19: "UNDERSTANDING OF GOD, COMMUNITY AND IDOLATRY"
SPEAKER: Dr. George Mendenhall, Professor of Ancient and Biblical
Studies and Near Eastern Studies, University of Michigan
MARCH 26: "THE PURSUIT OF JUSTICE IN CENTRAL AMERICA"
SPEAKER: Dr. Walter Owensby, Director, Inter-American Designs for
Economic Awareness, a church-sponsored program relating
to Latin America.
II. CARING COMMUNITIES IN ANN ARBOR
APRIL,2: "THE CHURCH AS A CARING COMMUNITY OF SUPPORT"
SPEAKERS: The Reverend William Ferry, Senior Minister Emeritus,
First Presbyterian Church
Mrs. Libby Hillegonds, Member,
Ecumenical Campus Center Board of Directors
APRIL 9: "THE CHURCH AND THE HOMELESS"
SPEAKER: The Reverend James Lewis, Senior Minister,
St. Andrews Episcopal Church
III. CARING COMMUNITY IN THE WORLD
APRIL 16: "COMPASSION AND JUSTICE IN SOUTHEAST ASIA"
SPEAKERS: The Reverend Barbara Fuller, Indo-China Consultant,
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
The Reverend Russell Fuller, Senior Minister,

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