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January 10, 1984 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-10

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4

Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 10, 1984

CCII Scoreboard
CCHA STANDINGS

Overall W
1) Bowling Green (20-2) 14
2) Ohio State (19-3) .... 14
3) Mich. State (1946) ... 13
4) N. Michigan (10-14) . 9
5) MICHIGAN (11-12) .. 8
Mich. Tech (13-11-1). 8
7) Ferris State (12-11-2) 7
8) W. Mich. (10-13-1) ... 5
9) Lake Superior (9-14-1) 6
10) Ill.-Chicago (3-20) .. 3
11) Miami (5-16-1).....3

L
2
3
5
7
8
8
8
10
12
13
14

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
I
0
0
0

Pct.
.875
.824
.722
.563
.500
.500
.469
.344
.333
.188
.176

This Week's Games
MICHIGAN at Illinois-Chicago
Bowling Green at Ferris State
Michigan.State at Ohio State
Michigan Tech at Miami
Western Michigan at N. Michigan
Michigan-Dearborn at Lake Superior
WMPL HOCKEY POLL
Pts.
1) Bowling Green (7) ...............96
2) North Dakota (2) .................80
3) R. P.I.(1) .......................73
4) Michigan State .................64
5) OhioState........................55
6) Minnesota-Duluth ................37
7) Minnesota ... ...............35
8) Boston College ...................32
(Tie) Wisconsin ....................32
10) Boston University ............... 21
CCHA Scores
MICHIGAN 2-6, Bowling Green 8-5
Michigan State 9-9, Miami 1-3
Illinois-Chicago 6-4, Michigan Tech 1-6
Ferris State 4-7, Western Michigan 4-3
Ohio State 8-5, Lake Superior 2-4

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Wolverine's goaltender Mark Chiamp did an admirable job in the Michigan net during Saturday night's win over top-
ranked Bowling Green. The junior stopped 46 of 51 shots in the game, including six in overtime, to keep the Wolverines
within striking distance.

SCORES
NBA
New York 111, Philadelphia 73
New Jersey 107, Washington 103
NHL

Second-half surge

Blue Lines r
'M'icers have heart . .
.. .just ask Bowling Green
By TIM MAKINEN
THE GAME isn't over until it's over.
That could be the motto of this season's Michigan hockey team. The
Wolverines may be young, they may be somewhat inexperienced, and they
definitely are suffering from injuries. But no one will ever accuse Michigan
of giving up.
All season long the Wolverines have demonstrated their determination to
continue in the face of seemingly insurmountable deficits. Never, however,
has their struggle been as dramatic as in Saturday night's thrilling, come-
from-behind, overtime victory against number-one ranked Bowling Green.
Twice in that contest it appeared that the powerful Falcons had clinched
the game and were going to skate out of Yost Ice Arena with their 21st vic-
tory ,against only one loss. Bowling Green took two-goal leads in the second
and third periods of the game, each time when it rattled off two goals in only
15 and eight seconds, respectively.
That would be enough to demoralize most opponents, but not the Michigan
players.
Playing with just as much intensity as they did at the beginning of the con-
test, the hustling Wolverines fought back and tied the game on two beautiful
goals from Bruce Macnab and Pat Goff. Michigan then won it in overtime
when senior co-captian Jim Mc-
Cauley slammed home a perfect
pass from teammate Ray Dries.
Only when the final red goal-light
flashed was this game over.
"The team is so young, you just
never quit," said McCauley, one of
only two four-year members on the
squad. "There is a desire to keep on
going and not quit. We know we can z "
skate with anyone, but there are no
real big goal-scorers, so the game is
always going to be close."
Indeed, it is an understatement to,~
say there have been a few close
ones. Saturday night marked the
eighth time this season that
Michigan has participated in over-
time action. Of the eight games, the M qule
Wolverines have won four and lost "you just never quit"
four. Then consider that they have
almost always had to come from behind just to send the games into over-
time. That's enough to make most coaches chew their fingernails down to
their elbows.
Said Michigan coach John Giordano prior to last weekend's series against
Bowling Green, "We're still not really comfortable with a lead. But the way
they always come back really tells you something about the character of
these kids."
Character is what it boils down to for Michigan. While seniors McCauley,
Dries, John DeMartino, and currently-injured Kelly McCrimmon often
fulfill important roles, much of the weight is carried by freshman,
sophomores, and junior netminder Mark Chiamp.
As Michigan's 8-8 league record testifies, it loses as many of the close ones
as it wins. But that is a marked improvement over last year.
This season, no opponent's lead is ever too secure from a Michigan
comeback, and no opponent is assured a win just because its chances for vic-
tory look a lot better than Michigan's do.
Just ask Ferris State which saw three and four-goal leads vanish in games
early last December at Yost Ice Arena.
Or ask the Spartans of Michigan State and the Wildcats of Northern
Michigan. Both figured they had easy sweeps of Michigan, but instead wit-
nessed the Wolverines storm back and knock them off on their home ice on
respective Saturdays in November.
Ask Michigan Tech, which narrowly escaped with a 5-4 overtime victory
against an injury-riddled Wolverine squad at the Great Lakes Invitational in
Detroit.
Better yet, ask Bowling Green, the nation's top-ranked team.
Each team will tell the same story: Michigan cannot be taken lightly.
Realistically the Wolverines can probably finish no higher than fourth
place this season. That would still represent quite an accomplishment given
their youth and injuries. And what of the playoffs?
Be patient for an answer.
Michigan has proven that nothing is ever certain until it's over.

'4

14

gives

Kent

1E
I
I>(eepIe.-7-84 UNION
IC ( rourxi [iloor

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Kenny
Walker and Winston Bennett scored 17
points apiece and powered a second-
half scoring run that carried No. 2 Ken-
tucky past Alabama 76-66 in a
Southeaster Conference basketball
game yesterday.
Walker scored 15 of his points in the
second half, including seven during a
23-4 surge that helped the Wildcats bury
the Crimson Tide.
THE VICTORY boosted Kentucky to
11-0 overall and 3-0 in the SEC, while
Alabama dipped to 8-4 and 1-2.
Alabama led 52-51 with11:49 to go, but
Kentucky slapped a trapping press on
the Crimson Tide and ran off the next 15
points.
A dunk by Walker punctuated the
outburst, giving the Wildcats a 66-52
lead with 6:47 to go.
Hoyas 74, Monmouth 54
LANDOVER, Md. (AP) - Patrick
Ewing scored 19 points, grabbed 13
rebounds and blocked seven shots to
lead fourth-ranked Georgetown to a 74-

ucky win
54 victory over Monmouth in college
basketball last night.
The victory, Georgetown's eighth
straight, raised the Hoyas record to 13-1.
Ewing sat out the final nine minutes
after taking an elbow to the head.
Georgetown officials decided to rest the
All-American center as a
precautionary measure.
Monmouth, playing its first year in
Division I, was led by Jesse Stout's 17
points. The Hawks, 3-9, hit just 10 of 33
field goal attempts in the opening half
as their leading scorer, Mason McBride
was scoreless for the half.

AP top Twenty

1. N. Carolina (39) ........
2. Kentucky (21)........
3. DePaul ................
4. Georgetown ............
5. Maryland ............
6. UCLA ................
7. Houston ...............
8. Texas-El Paso........
9. Illinois ................
10. St. John's...........
11. Louisiana St.........
12. Wake Forest.........
13. Fresno St...........
14. Nev.-Las Vegas .......
15. Georgia ...............
16. Oregon State.........
17. Oklahoma .............
18. Boston College
19. Memphis St.......... .
20. Tulsa .................

10-0
10-0
11-0
12-1
10-1
9-1
12-2
12-0
11-1
10-1
8-2
10-1
11-2
10-1
8-2
8-2
12-1
10-2
10-3
12-0

1179
1161
1053
1001
908
835
815
768
578
543
450
440
376
369
364
349
264
213
184
114

11.4

PRYOR ENTREPRENEURIAL AWARD
The PRYOR INDIVIDUAL ENTREPRENEUR PROJECT, in order to encourage entrepreneurship and new
business formation, will offer a $2,500 award for the best prepared, most innovative business plan
detailing the start-up strategy for a new enterprise which might be carried out by the contestant(s). Final
judges for the award will consist of a panel of veriture capitalists who may, at their option, offer financing
for the proposed firm. It is expected that the Pryor Entrepreneurial Award will become an annual contest
at the University of Michigan. During the first year, competition for the award will be conducted according
to the following rules:
1. The 1983/84 entrepreneurial contest is open to all students, graduate or undergraduate, at the University
of Michigan. Business plans may be submitted by a single person or by a group, and the groups may
consist of individuals from different department or schools (business, engineering, architecture,.law, etc.).
The only requirement is that members of each group must be formally registered as students at the
University of Michigan during the 1983/84 academic year.
2. The proposed business venture may center on a consumer product or service, an industrial product or
service, a real estate project or other venture. The level of technology involved in the product or service
may be high, medium or low. It is expected that the proposed product or service will be the idea of one
of the members of the group submitting the business plan, or will be an idea that can be legitimately
assigned to the group by the inventors. It is understood that the idea for the product or service will
remain the property of the group submitting the business plan, and the University of Michigan will
take all reasonable efforts to protect that ownership.
3. The written business plan is expected to contain, among other things, a description of the new product
or service, a delineation of its market segment, and an explanation of the marketing policies, production
facilities, financial needs and human competences required to develop a successful enterprise. The legal
form of the organization (proprietorship, partnership, or corporation) and the tax implications of the
investment (Chapter S, etc.) need not be included in the business plan; it is assumed that these could be
added by professional advisors in the event that the student(s) submitting the proposal decide to actually
start the firm.
4. The submitted business plans will be judged on the innovativeness and attractiveness of the concept, the
practicality of the marketing and production methods, the feasibility of the financing proposal, and the
clarity and precision of the plan. Preliminary screening will be done by faculty at the School fo Business
Administration, and by entrepreneurs within the southeastern Michigan area. The library at the School
of Business Administration will place books and articles that describe the small business formation
process and the content of well-prepared business plans on reserve for use by entrants in the contest. It

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