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March 09, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-09

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The Michigan Daily, Friday, March 9, 1984 - PageS

Women discuss administrative life

By SHARI EDSON
It may be a cliche, but according to
Maty Ann Swain, an associate vice
president for academic affairs, "If you
can run a household, you can run
anything."
At a panel discussion on "Women in
Higher Education Administration,"
held yesterday afternoon, Swain and
Robin Jacoby, an assistant to the vice
president of academic affairs, ex-
pgpiped the pleasures, pitfalls, and
tq fiques of being a woman ad-
njistrator.
IERYL EASLEY, an interim
a ociate dean for undergraduate
sties, was also expected to speak to
e, Academic Women's Caucus but was
"cght up in a meeting."

Her absence made the point just as
effectively as Swain and Jacoby did by
attending - there is little spare time
for these women running a family and a
career.
"I thought the schedule involved with
my new position would be a structured
day," said Jacoby of her move from
history professor to administator. But
compared to her current workload, the
nine-to-five grind looks relaxing.
"I HAVE TO take work home every
night and weekend," she said.
But being a woman administrator
poses special problems, she said.
Just before the discussion, Jacoby
received a call from her four-year-old
son's nursery school saying he was
sick. Jacoby's husband had to solve the
crisis.

"MEN AREN'T apt to think much
about scheduling a meeting at 7:30 in
the morning or 6 in the evening," she
said citing another problem. This is
when she has many family commit-
ments, she said.
Swain took a firm stance on which
commitments go first in this situation.
"I willInot meet at 6:30 in the mor-
ning," she said. "I may be a lone voice
crying in the wilderness, but I don't feel
apologetic," she said.
Of course, the two women didn't
describe the life of a woman ad-
ministrator as all conflict.
Swain said she appreciated the
"stimulating environment" and the
depth of. the issues involved. And
Jacoby compared her job to a liberal
arts degree because of the great variety
of issues she tackles.

iim
Campus gys play waiting Rgme

BA (Continued from Page 1)
Ohough Roach says students should
b6 free to do what they please in
private, it's a different issue for the
Ugyersity to adopt a policy supporting
homosexuality.
-IF YOU start singling out (groups)
you can run a pretty long list," adds
regent Paul Brown (D-Petoskey).
BiWn said his support of a policy
statement depends on the wording.
He would be in favor of a policy that
covers many forms of discrimination,
instead of focusing only on
homosexuals.
Regents Jim Waters (D-Muskegon)
and Gerald Dunn (D-Garden City) both
said they would support a statement.
Regent Robert Nederlander (D-
Detroit) said although he wouldn't ob-
ject to a non-discrimination policy
towards gays, the University's current
non-discrimination policies include gay
students.
"It's not the University's policy to
discriminate against anyone," he said.
But gay students say that without a
policy statement they are subject to job
discrimination and harassment with no

v s. v \..../ ..../

Back in the slammer APPhoto
Theodore Streleski, convicted murderer of a Stanford University professor, prepares to leave the California Correc-
tional Facility at Vacaville yesterday. He was returned to the prison three hours later after violating the terms of his
parole; he refused to promise not to kill again.

protection from the University.
ONE GAY man who asked not to be
identified, told Shapiro last week that
he was denied a job at the University
Hospital because he was a homosexiia
Joanna, a lesbian who worked at the!
University Hospital, said she was
harassed for more than a year by a
male co-worker who called her "But-
ch" in front of patients.
When describing incidents of7
discrimination, gays and lesbians are
reluctant to disclose their names
because they say without a University
policy for protection, their jobs could be
in jeopardy and they could risk further
harassment.
EVEN LAGROC members have kept
a low-profile in their negotiations with
Shapiro and the affirmative action office
director Virginia Nordby to avoid hur-
ting their chances for a policy
statement, says Bruce Aaron,
spokesman for LaGROC. LaGROC has
been tolerant of the delay, Aaron says.
"Things don't happen here in a mon-
th," Aaron says. "The president told
me he was shocked at how long this
whole thing has taken." Aaron says

he's confident that eventually a
statement will be issued.
But Aaron attributes the delays to a
general prejudice and fear of gays and
lesbians.
"We're talking homosexuality - that
is a scary thing for most people," he
says.
University officials' indecision goes
deeper than homophobia or ad-
ministrative hassles, says Donovan
Mack, a former LaGROC leader who
pioneered the movement for a bylaw
change.
"The administration is not whole-
heartedly behind the policy," Mack
says.
A member of the Michigan Gay Un-
dergraduates says LaGROC hasn't
been forceful enough with the ad-
ministration.
"LaGROC is too much of a push-
over," adds another gay student who
asked not to be identified. As a result,
their request isn't being taken seriously,
he said.
But Aaron insists the administration
is taking LaGROC very seriously.
"That's what's taking a long time," he
said.

Protesters,
plead-
not guilIty
(Continued from Page 1)
in Iowa yesterday and could not be
reached for comment.
Also after the sit-in arrests Tuesday,
an assault report was filed against
Marx, Jahalke said. Jahalke and Marx
declined to say who filed the report.
Meanwhile eight of the eleven
protestors from the sit-in pleaded not
guilty and three stood mute to charges
of trespassing yesterday morning in
15th District Court-of Ann Arbor. The
court entered a not guilty plea for those
who stood mute.
Before the arraignment, about 40
PSN members braved the cold to rally
in front of city hall in support of "The
Ann Arbor eleven.
The courtroom was packed and
several supporters had to wait outside
as each protester was read his rights.
S.J. Elden set a pre-trial date of April 10
for the protesters.

Daily Classifieds Bring
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BOARD OF REPRESENTATIVES
6 positions available
3 undergrad
3 graduate
APPLY at MSA by FRIDAY, MARCH 9
Interview Sunday, March 11
For more information, call 763-4182

.. - a ,

Clark says principles key to change

(Continued fromn Page 1)
BUT REAL change can only happen
if people believe in what they're
fighting for, Clark said.
People today don't realize that
segregation and discrimination against
blacks is still a serious problem, he
said.
Clark cited the disproportioriate
number of blacks in prisons and the
many Third-World countries that still
perate under apartheid.-
' RIGHT NOW we are seeing major
segregation occur in many parts of the
world. the little integration there was in
the residuals of Colonialism is
vanishing from Africa and Asia," he
said .
Blacks and Hispanics living in the
United States must band together to
solv such problems in third-World
natgbns, he said.
Clirk said that in the next ten years
Ithe civil rights movement should com-

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bine with the world peace movement to
gain power.
"You will have strength when you
combine with the struggle for human
rights," he said.
Although it's highly unlikely Rev.
Jessie Jackson will win the democratic

nomination for President, Clark said
Jackson's candidacy is a victory for
blacks as well as the rest of the country.
Clark said blacks should not become
disillusioned by Jackson's likely defeat
and urged them to-vote in the Dresiden-
tial election.,

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