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March 08, 1984 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-08

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4

Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 8, 1984
Cagers slow down,

stop Iowa
Feeling no Payne

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(Continued from Page 1)
as Bill Frieder's club missed nine of its
first 15 free throws. But the foul
shooting eventually picked up, and the
Hawkeyes could not take advantage of
the Wolverine miscues.
Iowa had its chances during the
second half when Michigan went into a
delay game and shot only 27 percent
from the floor. But while players like
Eric Turner (2-9) and Tim McCormick
(3-8) from the field, (4-9 from the line)
struggled offensively,they did the job on
the defensive end, holding the
Hawkeyes to 35 percent for the game.
"(Defense) was a key because we
were very sluggish offensively at
times," said Frieder, "especially at the
free throw line."
DESPITE THE exhaltations of a

M one step closer
to NCAA tournament

MICHIGAN

IOWA
Min FG/AFT/A R A PF TP

MinFG/AFT/A R A PF TP

sellout crowd, Iowa could not penetrate
the Michigan defense with any success.
Starters Payne (1-9 from the floor),
Steve Carfino (4-13), and Craig Ander-
son (3-8) were shut down completely.
"I think the big factor was that they
got on top first and we pretty much had
to play the game the way they wanted,"
said Hawkeye coach George Raveling.
"They were certainly far more
aggressive than we were."
Even with the outstanding defensive
effort, if Tarpley had not pulled in a

couple of big offensive rebounds after
missed McCormick free throws,
Michigan might be heading back to Ann
Arbor with 10 losses.
AT THE 2:42 mark, Michigan led,
40-36, when the 6-11 senior missed the
backend of a one and one. Tarpley stole
the board and McCormick converted to
give the Wolverines breathing room.
From that point Michigan cruised to its
fourth consecutive victory.
"It's nice of us to do that (get an of-
fensive rebound off a missed free
throw) for a change," Frieder said.
"They've (Iowa) been doing that for
years."~
"I was playing up the lane and
moving in real quick," explained Tar-
pley. "I knew sooner or later it would
pay off."
IT WAS Raveling's team's first loss
in five outings and the rookie coach was
afraid it spoiled his squad's chance for
an NIT bid.
"I guess from my perspective the fir-
st thing that sort of sealed our doom
was that we played with so little en-
thusiasm," he said. "We were just
emotionless out there in the first half. It
led to our gradual demise."
So while Michigan hasn't exactly
looked like North Carolina in its last
two outings, the victories have put the
team in a position where a win over
lowly Northwestern Saturday would
probably lock up a tournament birth.
Frieder had been saying that one more
win should put the Wolverines in the
tournament but he restrained his en-
thusiasm after theagame.
"When your fate is in the hands of
others you never know," he said
cautiously. "With a win on Saturday I
think we'll be in great shape."
And if Tarpley keeps playing like a
one-man team, Frieder will be riding
the center's back on the road to Seattle.
Big Ten Standings
Conf. Overall
WL WL
Purdue............. 14 3 21 6
Illinois ............... 13 3 22 4
Indiana ............. 12 5 19 8
MICHIGAN...........10 7 18 9
Ohio State ........... 8 9 15 12
Minnesota...........-6 10 15 11
Michigan State ....... 6 10 13 13
Iowa ................. 6 11 13 14
Northwestern .........4 12 11 15
Wisconsin ............. 4 13 8 19

Turner..........
Joubert...........
McCormick .......
Tarpley.........
Wade ...........
Reliford.........
Pelekoudas........
Rockymore........
Team Rebounds ..
TOTALS-.........

40
26
30
40
17
27
16
4

2/9
2/4
3/K
7/12
1/2
2/2
0/2
0/2

5/6
5/6
4/9
3/5
0/2
0/0
2/2
0/0

1
4
9
3
1
0

2 9
3 9
3 10
3 17
4 2
4
2 2
0 0

Berkenpas.........,
Carfino..........
Payne...........
Stokes ...........
Anderson ..........
Lohaus..........
Banks .............
Fullard..........
Boyle-.............
Team Rebounds ...

32
37
37
39
20
21
12
1
1

5/10
4/13
1/9
5/11
3/R
1/3
1/3
0/0
0/0

0/0
0/0
0/0
a/5
0/0
1/5
1/2
0/0
0/0

1
3
9
13
3
6
4
0
1

3
S
4
3
1
0
0

10
8
2
3
3.
0
0

4

2
42 11 22 46

17/41 19/30 36 10 20 53

TOTALS ..,..........20/57 6/12
Attendance:15.450

SCORING 1
MICHIGAN.............. 2
Iowa.....................20

2 T
'25 53
26 46

By Steve Wise
Iowa resurrects women s hoops..
..Michigan measures casket
When Iowa's Women's basketball team walks onto the floor of Crisler
Arena tonight, the Hawkeyes, concluding their first winning season in five
years, may be hit with a severe case of deja vu. They will see a Michigan
team that is closing its sixth losing season in seven years, a team with a
record of 8-44 in the last two years, and 4-20 this season.
But Iowa has turned things around. The folks in Iowa City hired a new
coaching staff led by Vivian Stringer. The new head Hawk had a 251-51
record at Cheyney State College near Philadelphia.
Under Stringer's guidance the once lowly Hawkeyes are now 15-10 overall
and 9-7 in the Big Ten. Substantially out-scored and out-rebounded last year,
Iowa has turned both these statistics to its favor. Stringer, however, said
defense has been the Hawk's greatest area of improvement.
"At Cheyney I was consistently (ranked) first or second in defense," said
Stringer. "I guess here at Iowa eighth (the Hawkeyes' current national
ranking) iso.k."
O:K.? It's a little short of incredible for a team that was 7-20 last year.
Defense is just one reason that Iowa has cruised to an 8-1 league record at
home. The Hawkeyes have a home court advantage, or rather 3,382 advan-
tages. That's the average number of fans that show up each game to see the
Vivian's oft-victorious troops. A Big Ten record horde of 7,130 was on hand
last Friday to see its newly beloved (last year's crowds were nowhere near
that size) beat Wisconsin, currently second in the Big Ten.
By comparison, or lack thereof, the biggest crowd to witness the
Wolverines at Crisler this season was 826.
Why would a group of people larger than the average one at a Michigan
home hockey game rush to see a team that had played for four years like the
stuff they spread on cornfields.
Actually Iowa fans were coerced.by a series of inovative promotions, in-
cluding television commercials featuring Stringer and Iowa men's basket-
ball coach George Raveling, various souvenir giveaways and a free trip for
two to Hawaii.
You might expect the hype to cost a bundle, but it doesn't, according to Iowa
women's athletic director Christine Grant.
"The items have not cost that much money," Grant said, "because we
brainstormed and came up with different ideas," including sponsorships for
most of the giveaways and getting the TV spots, worth about $35,000, donated
for nothing.
Unquestionably, the promotion - like the team - has been a success.
Stringer said the added attention has also added to the players' confidence.
"A hundred girls line up after every game to get the players autographs,"
said Stringer. "That has to make you feel you're imnortant"
The difference also shows in the two teams' coaching staffs. Michigan's
two part-time assistants, one in his first year of coaching, can't match up
with the Iowa duo of Marianna Freeman, a former head coach of Delaware
State College, and Jennifer Bednarek, a former assistant at Wichita State
and Southern Illinois.
Ocker downplayed the need for full-time assistants, but Stringer said they
are essential to a national class program.
"We couldn't function without them," said Stringer. "I can't explain it in
wins or losses, but they let us concentrate on every aspect of the athletes'
lives.
Iowa does have other advantages, including fan interest in new Carver
Hawkeye arena, lack of competition from professional teams and tremen-
dous fundraising ($190,000 last year) exclusively for the independent
women's department. Those factors, though, explain neither the success of
Iowa's program nor the failure of Michigan's.
"When an (athletic) administration is behind a program it's very evident
in what they say and do," Stringer said.
At Michigan, what that administration doesn't do - properly support the
team - is evident in what the team doesn't do - win.

9

AP Photo
Michigan's Eric Turner scores on a fade-away jump shot in last night's 53-
46 victory over Iowa.

Take Charge At 22.

In most jobs, at 22
you're near the bottom
of the ladder.
In the Navy, at
22 you can be a leader.
After just 16 weeks
of leadership training,
you're an officer. You'll
have the kind of job

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care of sophisticated
equipment worth
millions of dollars.
It's a bigger chal-
lenge and a lot more
responsibility than
most corporations give
you at 22. The rewards
are bigger, too. There's

I

JOSTEN' S
GOLD RING
SAI.F.___

- . -

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your education and training prepared
you for, and the decision-making au-
thority you need to make the most of it.
As a college graduate and officer
candidate, your Navy training is geared
to making you a leader. There is no boot
camp. Instead, you receive professional
training to help you build the technical
and management skills you'll need as a
Navy officer. - - - - -
This training is F NAVY OPPORTUC
designed to instill P.O. Box 5000, Clifton
confidence by first- oI'm ready to take c
hand experience. You | the Navy's officer prog
Name
learn by doing. On Address First s
your first sea tour, City __
you're responsible for i Age tCollege/Ur

a comprehensive package of benefits,
including special duty pay. The starting
salary is $17,000-more than most com-
panies would pay you right out of college.
After four years, with regular promo-
tions and pay increases, your salary will
have increased to as much as $31,000.
As a Navy officer, you grow, through
new challenges, new tests of your skills,

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and new opportunities
to advance your edu-
cation, including the
possibility of attending
graduate school while
you're in the Navy.
. Don't just take a
job. Become a Navy
officer, and take charge.
Even at 22.

I

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Monday, March 5 through Friday, March 9, 11:00 a.m.-
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rings from Josten's. During this week you can get $10
to $20 off 10K gold rings and $25 off all 14K gold rings.

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up to 30 men and the

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